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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Despite its phallic moniker, big dick energy (BDE) is gender neutral and can include badass women too.

    Don’t forget, Rihanna is the owner of the biggest BDE.

    Now, there’s a new concept in town – horse girl energy – which sounds a lot like what it is.

    The most prominent prerequisite for having horse girl energy is loving horses but is not limited to just that.

    The phrase started circulating on Twitter to describe women with an affection for horses before being extended to those who are blissfully unaware of social norms.

    According to the internet, people exude horse girl energy if they also enjoy going to Target, swimming at night, and call shotgun from across the car park while running to a car.

    They’re meant to be weird, lovable, and genuine. Basically, girls who DGAF.

    Instagram Photo

    Celebs and high profile figures like the Queen apparently have the energy, according to Twitter users; she rides horses every weekend, is a successful racehorse owner, and makes certain races immovable events on her calendar.

    Regina George, the fictional character from Mean Girls who still lives on in our hearts, is said to possess it. Taylor Swift who was voted as having negative big dick energy has bucket loads of the horse equivalent.

    Other qualities seem to include tagging boutiques on Instagram posts, using recycling bags for life as handbags, and randomly singing because their friends convinced them they’re good. It can extend to boys but has been used to describe girls thus far.

    The definition continues to expand.

    MORE: This aubergine is the embodiment of Big D*ck Energy

    MORE: Primark is receiving loads of praise for choosing a model who was born with one arm

    MORE: Pink Tax: Women are still paying up to 34% more for toiletries because of their gender


    Woman holding saddle, horse eating in background.Woman holding saddle, horse eating in background.faimabakar1Woman holding saddle, horse eating in background.Woman holding saddle, horse eating in background.faimabakar1

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    (Picture: Marina Way Hartlepool / Carrie Aimes)

    Picture yourself on a day out with friends or enjoying dinner at a restaurant with your partner.

    Then imagine, just for a moment, that there are no toilets available – and your only options are to hold it in, not drink all day, or face the humiliation of wetting yourself.

    It may sound extreme, but this is the reality that quarter of a million disabled people across the UK face every day.

    We need toilets known as Changing Places.

    These are larger than standard accessible toilets with additional equipment, and currently, there are not enough of them.

    Unless Changing Places become widely available in public places, disabled people face isolation.

    Many of us can’t leave the house, or cut our outings short for fear of not having a toilet to use.

    For me, the solution was even more drastic.

    In 2011, I underwent surgery to insert a suprapubic catheter. Medically, this surgery was unnecessary, and I didn’t want to do it.

    But I had reached the point where I was making myself ill and relying on assistance from others.

    I would either not go at all or dehydrate myself, because I was so desperate to avoid the indignity of struggling to transfer from my wheelchair to the loo when I needed to go to the toilet.

    Before I had the suprapubic catheter inserted, I also felt that I was a major burden on my parents, who are my primary carers.

    They are both in poor health themselves and it fell on them to get me to the loo.

    This was difficult enough at home, but when out and about, it was a truly exhausting and stressful process for all – not to mention wholly undignified and, at times, humiliating.

    (Picture: Carrie Aimes)

    I was constantly aware of how much I could allow myself to drink, consciously clock watching and thinking:

    How many hours will I be out?

    How long will I have to go without drinking?

    How long do I need to hold it in for?

    The severe dehydration that I was putting myself through also resulted in headaches, fatigue, poor focus and an impaired immune system.

    The suprapubic catheter is by no means an easy fix, and it took many months to adjust to it.

    But to me, it felt like the only option, so I have to endure all the negative side effects that come with it, in order to lead any kind of ‘normal’ independent life.

    New research by the Changing Places Consortium reveals that just 17 pubs, restaurants and cafés across the whole of the UK have registered Changing Places toilets, while many large towns and cities, such as Salford, Luton and Stockton-on-Tees, do not have a single registered facility.

    That means that disabled people who live in or visit these areas face the choice of not going out or lying down on dirty toilet floors to be changed.

    Just imagine the humiliation.

    The findings also revealed that out of 2,500 railway stations in the UK, only 12 have a Changing Places facility – this is less than 0.5%.

    Have you ever been on a long train journey and not needed to go the toilet? Probably not. And neither have many disabled people.

    We need people to take action now.

    We need to see Changing Places toilets in all large railway stations.

    We need there to be at least one toilet in every town, which would ensure no one is caught short when on a day out.

    And simply recommending Changing Places is not enough.

    It needs to go further than that, which is why the consortium is calling for changes to legislation in order to make Changing Places toilets mandatory in new large public buildings.

    It’s shocking that in this day and age, there are people who cannot go to the toilet properly when they’re on a day out.

    Changing Places toilets are a much-needed lifeline for disabled people – and I will not stop campaigning until they are commonplace across the UK.

    MORE: Parents forced to change disabled daughter on floor in John Lewis toilet

    MORE: Mum forced to change her severely disabled child on Disney’s toilet floor

    MORE: Disabled boy sues theme park because they don’t have a toilet he can use


    Marina Way Hartlepool-778aMarina Way Hartlepool-778aallieabgarianMarina Way Hartlepool-778aMarina Way Hartlepool-778aallieabgarian

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    There are three things in this world that I am afraid of – heights, alligators and drowning.

    So how on earth did I end up zip wiring over a pond filled with over 200 gators?

    The short answer is: Florida made me do it. For the long answer, read on.

    When you think of Florida, you think of film studios, rollercoasters and a certain mouse.

    I thought we would be hard pressed to fill a week in the city without visiting at least one. But to my pleasant surprise, you can have the holiday of a lifetime – for adrenaline junkies and families alike – without setting foot anywhere near ‘The Big Three’.

    Florida for adrenaline junkies

    Hot Air Balloon ride, Orlando, Florida
    (Picture: Getty)

    Rollercoasters aren’t the only way to get your kicks in Florida.

    The first place you should go to get your heart rate up is Orlando Balloon Rides.

    Now, as a long-term sufferer of acrophobia, AKA the gut-wrenching fear of being more than two feet off the ground, I wasn’t really looking forwards to this part of my trip. But knowing that this was genuinely a once in a lifetime, bucket list item, I just couldn’t miss it.

    I am so glad that I took that chance. The team made this hour-long venture across the Florida skyline a thrill that took the edge off my formerly paralysing fear.

    If you are feeling extra brave, take a look over the edge of the gondola as you soar over a lake or river – if you’re lucky, you’ll be able to see your reflection clear as day.

    Let’s not forget that we’re in Florida – there are alligators are everywhere.

    In fact, they say if there is a body of water larger than a puddle, there will be an alligator in it.

    The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), sometimes referred to colloquially as a gator or common alligator, is a large crocodilian reptile endemic to the southeastern United States. it is one of two living species in the genus Alligator within the family Alligatoridae; it is larger than the other extant alligator species, the Chinese alligator. The American alligator inhabits freshwater wetlands, such as marshes and cypress swamps from Texas to North Carolina. it is distinguished from the sympatric American crocodile by its broader snout, with overlapping jaws and darker coloration, and is less tolerant of saltwater but more tolerant of cooler climates than the American crocodile, which is found only in tropical climates
    (Picture: Getty)

    Gatorland is billed as a halfday attraction, making it the perfect destination for travellers who have a late flight or just fancy a lazy morning or afternoon by the pool.

    It was here that I, self-confessed yellow-bellied chicken, faced all three of my fears on one terrifying line of wire.

    The staff were friendly and had an excellent sense of humour.

    As our wonderful guide came in close to clip me to the wire, he looked me in the eye and said, ‘hey, don’t worry, they don’t like English food.’

    I laughed.

    The next thing I knew, I was flying mere inches above an alligator and a few feet below circling vultures.

    If you fancy an up close and personal interaction with these predators, then Gatorland offers you the chance to do so with a gator feed.

    gator feeding
    (Picture: Elle Rudd)

    When the gates to a small section of land in front of the vast lake were opened, the guides paced along the shoreline, calling the gators like dogs. I honestly believed that they were having us on, and that there was no way these beasts of the deep could be tempted out by whistling and hooting.

    But, slowly out of the depths rose hordes of terrifying creatures.

    Three by three, we were called up to feed these dinosaur throwbacks. By the time I had picked up my slabs of rancid meat, more than 40 gators had gathered.

    They were so motionless, you could almost believe that they were statues – until you fling their feed at them, that is.

    Our next stop was Boggy Creek AirBoat Rides.

    Trust me when I say this: if you only do one thing in Florida, go to Boggy Creek and get on an airboat.

    Instagram Photo

    Learning how to drive an airboat was the coolest thing I have ever done in my entire life.

    As we climbed aboard what resembles a massive hairdryer on a big plank of wood, the sun began to set over the headwaters of the Everglades. The sky turned from azure into a watercolour glory of pinks and purples that reflected back in the still waters ahead.

    Off in the distance, the trail of a rocket that had been launched from the Kennedy Space Centre drew a perfect white line in the sky.

    As we peeled away from the dock, the great expanse of Lake Tohopekaliga revealed itself. The sky merged into the lake until you couldn’t differentiate between them, and then everything around us, including the air, was pink.

    We took our lessons two at a time and I volunteered to be the passenger first. And I am so glad I did.

    When you’re racing through the ever-growing lake at speeds of up to 45mph with nothing in front of you, you actually feel like you’re flying.

    The sensation is so exhilarating that I found myself physically unable to stop laughing.

    As we slowed down towards the centre of the lake, I was finally able to catch my breath. And I stopped to take in the incredible scenes around me.

    A really dramatic sunset over the Everglades in Florida while a flock of birds crosses the sky in the classical V formation
    (Picture: Getty)

    The dock area was now out of sight and we had the whole lake to ourselves. With the fan turned off, there was nothing around but a perfect silence. It was heaven.

    Then it was time for me to get in the driver’s seat.

    For anyone who might be nervous about taking control, don’t be. The captains not only know the boats like the back of their hand, but the waters too. They are also in control of the speed, so you don’t have to worry about multitasking. You just take the lever, and steer.

    Later, we also went late night gator spotting.

    The one hour night expedition is the best way to get up close to nature’s nocturnal hunters.

    Prowling through the tall grass and marshy waters, you never know what is going to be around the next corner. That is, until you spot one, it’s eyes reflecting back at you like cat eyes in the road.

    For adventure on dry-ish land, there’s Revolution Off Road.

    driving through mud
    (Picture: Elle Rudd)

    Release your inner racer and take on 230 acres of muddy, backwater roads in one of their ATV’s – or even take to the water in a mucky duck, an 8-wheel amphibious vehicle that can take on all terrains and floats through the water with ease.

    Just be warned and take their tagline very seriously: prepare to get dirty.

    If the idea of splashing through muddy puddles at speed doesn’t appeal to you, you can also try shooting, archery and fishing.

    But to be honest, I would be more than happy just to sit by the lake and drink a cold beer.

    Pulse memorial

    Orlando is known as a destination for parties, fun and childlike joy. But it has also had its tragedies.

    On June 12, 2016, 49 people were killed in one of the worst mass shootings in US history. It was a day that shook the local residents, the LGBTQ+ and Hispanic communities, as well as the world.

    The nightclub itself, Pulse, is now permanently closed, and stands behind a fence decked out in the most beautiful and fitting tribute.

    ‘Love not hate’, ‘We will not be defeated’ and ‘#OrlandoStrong’ are written, posted and shouted from every corner of this memorial.

    If you go, remember to bring a pen and write your own message of love and remembrance.

    Orlando for families

    Orlando, Florida, United States, North America
    (Picture: Getty)

    You might think it’s cruel to take your kids to Orlando and not take them to Disney, but the city has so much more on offer to keep the little ones occupied.

    Start at Wonderworks, an amusement park that’s 35,000sqft of ‘edu-tainment’.

    It’s not just exhibitions, every corner of Wonderworks has activities for the whole family.

    While you’re there, be sure to catch The Outta Control Magic Comedy Dinner Show. It’s an opportunity to dig into unlimited pizza and watch entertainment that will leave you saying ‘Wow, that’s amazing!’

    It’s not recommended for those who are shy at heart, though, as you are expected to be willing to get involved.

    If that doesn’t tickle your fancy, don’t despair. It is not the only dinner show that Orlando has to offer.

    Instagram Photo

    Take a trip back to the Dark Ages at Medieval Times where you can watch gallant knights perform daring stunts on horseback.

    Re-live the classic film A Knight’s Tale, and root for your knight to take the crown and the honour of that evening’s battle (Heath Ledger not included).

    For something more modern, head to ICON Orlando 360.

    There, take a trip on the 400ft Orlando Eye, which allows you to see the Florida sky line; dive into the deep with the Sea Life Aquarium and learn all about what lies beyond the shores of Florida; or get that celeb selfie you have always wanted at the iconic and America-centric Madame Tussauds.

    The Orlando Eye
    (Picture: Getty)

    There’s also the Kennedy Space Centre.

    All the exhibits at the Kennedy Space Centre are truly remarkable, but as I sat through the interactive presentation about NASA’s space shuttle program, the majesty of worlds beyond our own hit me.

    When the space shuttle Atlantis is finally revealed to you during the walking tour, you’d be hard pressed not to well up.

    For locals, Fun Spot is a goto weekend and evening attraction.

    Open from 2pm to midnight every day, it boasts a 300ft tall SkyCoaster, a white knuckle ride designed for the boldest of thrillseekers.

    It also comes with an onsite bar, serving beers, wine and cocktails. Just so you know.

    Instagram Photo

    If you’re visiting the Kissimmee site, make sure you visit on a Saturday to catch the Old Town Classic Car show and cruise, America’s longest running weekly car show.

    In just one short week, I fell in love with a different side of Florida – and it’s time you did too.

    Where to shop in Florida:

    Everything is bigger in America and that includes their shopping malls.

    The Florida Mall is a magnificent labyrinth of consumerism. I genuinely believe that you could find anything you wanted or desired inside its gleaming white walls.

    Within 20 minutes of being inside, I had fixed my broken phone and spent all my remaining pennies in Sephora.

    I have said before that in Florida, try as you might, Disney is an unavoidable fact of life.

    But Disney Springs is the version for grown ups, with bars, restaurants and shops as far as the eye can see. Here, treat yourself to the finer things in life.

    Finally, if you’re looking for a bargain, head to Prime Outlets, where you can pick up American brands at a discount.

    A few places to eat in Florida:

    Instagram Photo

    Glorious gluttony has to be a holiday staple. And American’s do food really, really well.

    Exhausted from a day shopping at Disney Springs? Put down the shopping bags and refuel at Planet Hollywood.

    The classic American food chain now features an exclusive menu by world-famous TV chef Guy Fieri, featuring burgers, chickens and massive salads.

    The area around ICON Orlando 360 is overflowing with restaurants and bars, the abundance of which could be overwhelming. But fear not, Yard House has everything you need, whether it’s just a refreshing beer, or the food.

    Buca Di Beppo was the perfect layover between exploring the depths of the Florida Mall and our journey back to the UK.

    Fill up on carbonara and garlic bread. As the saying goes, ‘there is no such thing as too much garlic bread’.

    Where to stay in Orlando and how to get there:

    The Ramada on International Drive is the ideal place to stay for Orlando and Kissimmee. If you can’t resist visiting the big theme parks, they are just a short drive away and the hotel also offers a free shuttle service to local attractions.

    Rooms there start from £89 per night.

    Virgin Atlantic has several flights from London Gatwick to Orlando each day. Flights start from £401 return, and will vary depending on the date of travel.

    MORE: Want to look beyond the Colosseum? Here are the lesser-known wonders of Rome you should see during your visit

    MORE: From hipster cafes to chilled out parks, here’s how to explore Stockholm like a local

    MORE: Camels, dune bashing and star gazing: How to get the most out of Abu Dhabi’s desert


    The Orlando EyeThe Orlando Eyeellerudd94Hot Air Balloon ride, Orlando, FloridaThe American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), sometimes referred to colloquially as a gator or common alligator, is a large crocodilian reptile endemic to the southeastern United States. it is one of two living species in the genus Alligator within the family Alligatoridae; it is larger than the other extant alligator species, the Chinese alligator. The American alligator inhabits freshwater wetlands, such as marshes and cypress swamps from Texas to North Carolina. it is distinguished from the sympatric American crocodile by its broader snout, with overlapping jaws and darker coloration, and is less tolerant of saltwater but more tolerant of cooler climates than the American crocodile, which is found only in tropical climatesgator feedingA really dramatic sunset over the Everglades in Florida while a flock of birds crosses the sky in the classical V formationdriving through mudOrlando, Florida, United States, North AmericaThe Orlando EyeThe Orlando EyeThe Orlando Eyeellerudd94Hot Air Balloon ride, Orlando, FloridaThe American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), sometimes referred to colloquially as a gator or common alligator, is a large crocodilian reptile endemic to the southeastern United States. it is one of two living species in the genus Alligator within the family Alligatoridae; it is larger than the other extant alligator species, the Chinese alligator. The American alligator inhabits freshwater wetlands, such as marshes and cypress swamps from Texas to North Carolina. it is distinguished from the sympatric American crocodile by its broader snout, with overlapping jaws and darker coloration, and is less tolerant of saltwater but more tolerant of cooler climates than the American crocodile, which is found only in tropical climatesgator feedingA really dramatic sunset over the Everglades in Florida while a flock of birds crosses the sky in the classical V formationdriving through mudOrlando, Florida, United States, North AmericaThe Orlando Eye

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    (Picture: Kelli Mulhollen Dumas / Facebook)

    When you’re at the beach, you’re not really thinking of parasites.

    But you probably should, especially if you’re left with any bites or bumps. Kelli Mulhollen Dumas wasn’t alarmed when her 17-year-old son Michael came home with some pink marks on his feet.

    After he came home from a trip to Florida, U.S, Michael had some bumps that then spread into a red, itchy rash. But when they found out the culprit was cutaneous larva migrans otherwise known as hookworms, the family were worried.

    The condition can cause something unpleasantly called Creeping Eruption, a skin infection which causes severe itching, blisters, and a red growing, winding rash. It usually appears on areas of the body that have been exposed to contaminated ground.

    Woman warns against beach parasites Screen grab: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10215867959152550&set=pcb.10215867959632562&type=3&theater
    (Picture: Kelli Mulhollen Dumas / Facebook)
    Woman warns against beach parasites screen grab: https://www.facebook.com/kelli.m.dumas/posts/10215867959632562
    (Picture: Kelli Mulhollen Dumas / Facebook)

    Michael had posed for pictures while he was buried in the sand which is how he got infected.

    ‘Michael was on Pompano Beach in June and we are still fighting this,’ she told Metro.co.uk.

    ‘Their mission group contained 17 people. Of the group, seven have contracted hookworms.

    ‘Do not go to the beach without closed toe water shoes on your feet. My son is very sick and will have permanent scars. He cannot put band-aids on his wounds. He has to take a bath in bleach water every day to help prevent infection. He has to dress his wounds three times a day.’

    ‘We had another appointment with our dermatologist two days ago. We have to go every Friday until his wounds heal and that means months.’

    Kelli also revealed her daughter is getting married next month and Michael is a groomsman which she said she’s worried about as he is still unable to wear shoes or socks.

    Woman warns against beach parasites
    (Picture: Kelli Mulhollen Dumas / Facebook)

    Keli added that the Health Department in Pompano Beach told her that everyone in the area knows to wear shoes in case of parasites but Kelli argued that not everyone did.

    She is now urging people to pray for Michael’s recovery as she learns more about the condition.

    Hookworms usually affect the feet and buttocks and are passed on through soil or sand.

    So if you are heading to the beach, try to make sure you’re aware of the area’s requirements and whether there’s a contamination risk.

    MORE: Boy’s feet infected with worms after friends buried him on beach for fun

    MORE: I had to have a urinary catheter inserted because the UK doesn’t have enough suitable disabled toilets


    Woman warns against beach parasitesWoman warns against beach parasitesfaimabakar1Woman warns against beach parasites Screen grab: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10215867959152550&set=pcb.10215867959632562&type=3&theaterWoman warns against beach parasites screen grab: https://www.facebook.com/kelli.m.dumas/posts/10215867959632562Woman warns against beach parasitesWoman warns against beach parasitesWoman warns against beach parasitesfaimabakar1Woman warns against beach parasites Screen grab: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10215867959152550&set=pcb.10215867959632562&type=3&theaterWoman warns against beach parasites screen grab: https://www.facebook.com/kelli.m.dumas/posts/10215867959632562Woman warns against beach parasites

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    (Picture: Ella Byworth)

    Many of us have been brought up by mums who have spent years on diets.

    We’ve grown up watching them criticise their bodies in mirrors, starving themselves on shakes and stinking out the house on cabbage soup diets.

    And it’s pretty obvious that having parents who diet might lead us to forge less-than-positive relationships with food ourselves.

    But what is less commonly spoken about is how that kind of upbringing might impact on how – rather than what – we eat.

    A new study has been looking at what role ‘fat talking’ has on the ability for children to eat mindfully.

    ‘Fat talking’, the report says, is the negative vocabulary we use to talk about our own bodies, and hearing this ‘fat talk’ from one’s own family may reinforce notions of self-objectification in women (the study exclusively talked about daughters), which in turn make women less attuned to the internal workings of their own bodies. That ultimately leads them to eat less mindfully and rely more on external cues to guide their eating.

    Mindful eating involves listening to your body and allowing yourself not to be distracted by external forces; you eat because you’re hungry and you do so without the TV on or a book to distract you from the activity.

    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    What this research claims, however, is that when we’re brought up hearing our parents talk about their bodies negatively, we end up trying to detach ourselves from eating. The more kids are exposed to family ‘fat talk’, the less likely they are to appreciate their body and their bodily functions.

    And that’s interesting because the study claims that frequent mindful eating is associated with higher levels of body appreciation and functionality. So the more comfortable you are with eating and the more engrossed you can be with the activity of dining, the better you tend to feel about your body and the better you are at understanding the signals it sends you.

    According to clinical psychologist Alexis Conason, ‘this study adds to a growing body of research supporting the harmful effects of negative body talk in the family environment, and shows us that even indirect negative body talk (i.e., conversations between parents not directed at the child) can lead to less mindful eating, more disordered eating, less body appreciation, and more body dissatisfaction in children which persists into adulthood.’

    She recommends that we take a pause before expressing anything negative about our bodies.

    ‘Kids hear and absorb every message we send to them, even the subtle ones. If we are to set them up for a positive experience with their bodies, we must be the example.

    ‘If you need support in healing your own body image, please seek out treatment with a therapist trained in body image and size inclusivity.’

    Perhaps with the advent of the body positivity movement, there’ll be less damage caused to future generations; it’s no longer quite so fashionable to lament how fat or curvy we are. It’s fine to not feel amazing about your body every day, and to have goals to change/improve the way we feel and look, but perhaps a more productive and cathartic way of dealing with those feelings, however, would be to keep a journal where you can rant/keep track/post photos, or confide in a partner or friend.

    You don’t have to stay silent about poor body image but we do need to break the cycle of teaching girls to hate themselves before they’ve even stopped growing.

    MORE: I had to have a urinary catheter inserted because the UK doesn’t have enough suitable disabled toilets

    MORE: Woman doesn’t know her pictures from university are used all over the world


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    When she was 14, Zee saw a snake in a pet shop that she just had to buy so she split the cost with her brother and bought it home.

    Now training to be a veterinary nurse, the 21-year-old owns 16 snakes who live in her bedroom.

    Among her trove of reptiles, her favourites are a majestic 16-foot Burmese python, a boa constrictor, royal python, and a blood python.

    Though she’s been bitten countless times, she doesn’t think her beloved pets will ever act aggressively towards her.

    *** EXCLUSIVE - VIDEO AVAILABLE *** LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - UNDATED: Zee takes a selfie with one of her constrictors in London, England. An animal lover has turned her small London flat into a secluded paradise for her collection of snakes, including a 16 foot Burmese python. Zee, 21, who is training to be a veterinary nurse, first saw a snake at six-years-old and has been obsessed with them ever since. At 14-years-old, she split the price of her first snake with her brother before bringing it home to her mum, who quickly had to get used to the idea of living in a mini reptile house. Now the animal lover has collected 16 snakes, including her majestic Burmese python, who likes to slither around the hallways to relax, a boa constrictor, royal python and a blood python. PHOTOGRAPH BY Barcroft Images
    (Picture: Barcroft Media)
    *** EXCLUSIVE - VIDEO AVAILABLE *** LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - MAY 21: Zee with her two largest snakes in the hallway of her flat on May 21, 2018 in London, England. An animal lover has turned her small London flat into a secluded paradise for her collection of snakes, including a 16 foot Burmese python. Zee, 21, who is training to be a veterinary nurse, first saw a snake at six-years-old and has been obsessed with them ever since. At 14-years-old, she split the price of her first snake with her brother before bringing it home to her mum, who quickly had to get used to the idea of living in a mini reptile house. Now the animal lover has collected 16 snakes, including her majestic Burmese python, who likes to slither around the hallways to relax, a boa constrictor, royal python and a blood python. PHOTOGRAPH BY Bahareh Hosseini / Barcroft Images
    (Picture: Barcroft Media)

    ‘I have been bitten almost every week,’ she said.

    ‘It depends on the bite and the severity of it. With a feeding bite, for example, alcohol is the best way of getting a snake off you if they’re not letting go, or putting their heads underwater.

    ‘If it’s a small snake, just wait. They’re going to let go of it at some point. When it’s a touch and release, I like to call them love taps, I just clean off the wound and get on with whatever I’m doing.

    ‘Snakes are not out to kill you; they aren’t out to get you. They do tend to be extremely nervous animals,’ she added.

    ‘My favourite animal would be my big girl, Scarlet, my Burmese python. She’s my absolute pride and joy. I actually struggle to pick her up by myself so it’s usually a two-man job to deal with her.’

    *** EXCLUSIVE - VIDEO AVAILABLE *** LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - UNDATED: Zee after being bitten by one of her 16 snakes in London, England. An animal lover has turned her small London flat into a secluded paradise for her collection of snakes, including a 16 foot Burmese python. Zee, 21, who is training to be a veterinary nurse, first saw a snake at six-years-old and has been obsessed with them ever since. At 14-years-old, she split the price of her first snake with her brother before bringing it home to her mum, who quickly had to get used to the idea of living in a mini reptile house. Now the animal lover has collected 16 snakes, including her majestic Burmese python, who likes to slither around the hallways to relax, a boa constrictor, royal python and a blood python. PHOTOGRAPH BY Barcroft Images
    (Picture: Barcroft Media)
    *** EXCLUSIVE - VIDEO AVAILABLE *** LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - UNDATED: Zee with one of her 16 snakes in London, England. An animal lover has turned her small London flat into a secluded paradise for her collection of snakes, including a 16 foot Burmese python. Zee, 21, who is training to be a veterinary nurse, first saw a snake at six-years-old and has been obsessed with them ever since. At 14-years-old, she split the price of her first snake with her brother before bringing it home to her mum, who quickly had to get used to the idea of living in a mini reptile house. Now the animal lover has collected 16 snakes, including her majestic Burmese python, who likes to slither around the hallways to relax, a boa constrictor, royal python and a blood python. PHOTOGRAPH BY Barcroft Images
    (Picture: Barcroft Media)

    Zee often lets out the larger snakes onto the hallway where they can slither as they please.

    They’ve even managed to get into the walls and under the floorboards in the flat, resulting in a few visits from the fire brigade to help get them out again.

    Zee’s Burmese pythons are fed once a month on extra large rabbits, roughly three to six kilograms, while the smaller ones are fed on a diet of rodents or chicks.

    *** EXCLUSIVE - VIDEO AVAILABLE *** LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - UNDATED: Zee with her two largest snakes in the hallway of her flat in London, England. An animal lover has turned her small London flat into a secluded paradise for her collection of snakes, including a 16 foot Burmese python. Zee, 21, who is training to be a veterinary nurse, first saw a snake at six-years-old and has been obsessed with them ever since. At 14-years-old, she split the price of her first snake with her brother before bringing it home to her mum, who quickly had to get used to the idea of living in a mini reptile house. Now the animal lover has collected 16 snakes, including her majestic Burmese python, who likes to slither around the hallways to relax, a boa constrictor, royal python and a blood python. PHOTOGRAPH BY Barcroft Images
    (Picture: Barcroft Media)
    *** EXCLUSIVE - VIDEO AVAILABLE *** LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - MAY 21: Zee pets her favorite snake, her 16 foot Burmese python on May 21, 2018 in London, England. An animal lover has turned her small London flat into a secluded paradise for her collection of snakes, including a 16 foot Burmese python. Zee, 21, who is training to be a veterinary nurse, first saw a snake at six-years-old and has been obsessed with them ever since. At 14-years-old, she split the price of her first snake with her brother before bringing it home to her mum, who quickly had to get used to the idea of living in a mini reptile house. Now the animal lover has collected 16 snakes, including her majestic Burmese python, who likes to slither around the hallways to relax, a boa constrictor, royal python and a blood python. PHOTOGRAPH BY Bahareh Hosseini / Barcroft Images
    (Picture: Barcroft Media)
    *** EXCLUSIVE - VIDEO AVAILABLE *** LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - MAY 21: Zee and her mum Zoe with Zee's two biggest snakes, a burmese python and a boa constrictor on May 21, 2018 in London, England. An animal lover has turned her small London flat into a secluded paradise for her collection of snakes, including a 16 foot Burmese python. Zee, 21, who is training to be a veterinary nurse, first saw a snake at six-years-old and has been obsessed with them ever since. At 14-years-old, she split the price of her first snake with her brother before bringing it home to her mum, who quickly had to get used to the idea of living in a mini reptile house. Now the animal lover has collected 16 snakes, including her majestic Burmese python, who likes to slither around the hallways to relax, a boa constrictor, royal python and a blood python. PHOTOGRAPH BY Bahareh Hosseini / Barcroft Images
    Mum Zoe wasn’t the biggest fan at first but is now used to them (Picture: Barcroft Media)

    ‘They’re very, very attractive animals in my opinion. They’re sweethearts, they’re so docile that they would never bite me out of aggression,’ added Zee.

    ‘They would hiss at me, they would do their little belly flop, they would let me know that they want to be alone. But that’s the worse they would do and I don’t mind that at all.

    ‘What’s not to love? They are absolutely fascinating animals and I learn something new about them every single day.’

    MORE: How to keep your indoor cat cool in the summer

    MORE: Should I keep my pet inside during a thunderstorm?

    MORE: Woman stung by scorpion that travelled in her suitcase from Costa Rica to Britain


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    (Picture: Tommy Hilfiger)

    In this era of constant surveillance, we leave a digital footprint everywhere we go.

    Our phones, laptops, watches are busy recording our activity and location all the time.

    And if our tech wasn’t enough, now our clothes are starting to do the same thing.

    Tommy Hilfiger is fusing wearable tech and fashion with the launch of his Tommy Jeans Xplore range.

    The new collection will see hoodies, jeans, skirts and accessories incorporate a Bluetooth chip in an attempt to create what the brand calls ‘a micro-community of brand ambassadors’.

    The Xplore chip promises to track your movements and offer up rewards based on how much you wear your garms – with gift cards and Tommy clobber on offer. And there’ll also be bonuses for wearing your chipped clothes past certain Tommy Jeans locations which are marked on the accompanying Xplore app.

    Wearers will be able to turn off tracking if they don’t fancy being trapped in a real-life Black Mirror episode, but if you decide to withdraw then you’ll be disqualified from gaining any of the rewards.

    So really it’s a choice between free Tommy gear and being easily stalked.

    It’s a toughie.

    The concept is only available stateside for the time being but who knows, maybe we’ll all soon be following each other’s Tommy avatar around London soon.

    MORE: Woman shares her bedroom with a collection of snakes, including a 16ft python

    MORE: Apparently, dunking biscuits in tea constitutes inappropriate office etiquette


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    (Picture: Drew Doggett Photography)

    Thanks to those of you who cursed the hot weather, we now find ourselves back in November-like conditions.

    So perhaps it’s time to stop looking at pictures of overly hot dogs and start getting inspiration from up north. Much further up north.

    NYC-based photographer Drew Doggett has been capturing the magic of wild ponies in Iceland.

    The island is covered in these enchanting, tiny horses, and there’s even a belief among some that they’re actually the descendants of a mythological eight-legged Icelandic horse called Sleipnir, which belonged to the god Odin.

    During his time in Iceland, Drew stayed on a farm with hundreds of horses and was initially drawn to the incredible landscape by tales of folklore. For him, the icy lagoons, black sandy beaches and roaring waterfalls chime perfectly with the beauty of the ubiquitous ponies.

    Drew tends to shoot in monochrome but has ventured into colour for this ‘In the Realm of Legends’ series.

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    ‘The light created brilliant hues that added a sublime texture to the entire series,’ he tells My Modern Met.

    ‘Coupled with the contrast between the landscape and the horses, I knew this body of work demanded colour.’

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    To see more of Drew’s work (much of which includes horses of varying nationalities), you can visit his website.

    MORE: Take a look at Siam Park, the best water park in Europe

    MORE: Woman shares her bedroom with a collection of snakes, including a 16ft python


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    (Picture: Getty)

    Fried chicken is one of those foods that seem to drive people crazy.

    There are fried chicken shops on every corner. Boxes of bones abandoned on bus seats. People arguing about chicken wings online.

    On Twitter, chicken loves have been debating which type of wing is the best – drums or flats.

    For anyone not down with the fried chicken lingo, a flat is the middle part of the wing (also known as the ‘winglette’).

    Most folks seem to believe that if a chicken’s been fried, the only part worth having is the drum…even if it does involve gnawing your way around a massive bone

    But for those willing to pick through a box of drums to find boneless gold, flats win every time

    And then there are the rest of us to whom any part of a wing is just a wing.

    Only on Twitter could so many people could have so many opinions about boxes of chicken.

    MORE: Now that winter is back, enjoy these Icelandic ponies playing in the snow

    MORE: Apparently, dunking biscuits in tea constitutes inappropriate office etiquette


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    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Recently a female journalist ended up in the middle of an internet storm for sharing a screen shot of a conversation where she and a friend detailed the things that they would do inexchange for a faster metabolism or a guaranteed size 10 body for the rest of their lives. The actions specifed involved canvassing for UKIP or voting Tory.

    The now deleted post angered members of the body positive community who explained it was an example of fatphobia, saying that it proved how deeply ingrained the hatred of fat people and fear of fatness was.

    Which left me wondering: is it possible to want to be thinner than you currently are and be body positive, or does wanting to lose weight automatically make you fatphobic?

    I, like most women, have a complicated relationship with my body. And I, like a lot of women, would trade quite a lot in order to lose weight. In fact a recent study from Boux Avenue found that two thirds of young people would take a 20% pay cut to have a perfect body would take a pay cut in exchange for weight loss.

    Over the last decade I’ve worked incredibly hard to accept my medium sized body. I know that despite having issues with how I look, I’m lucky. My weight doesn’t stop me from shopping in High Street shops and doesn’t make me the victim of judging on public transport. So really, I’ve got nothing to complain about.

    And yet I would do some quite rogue things if I could wake up a dress size smaller and stay that way regardless of what I ate. Voting Tory is the least of it. Why? Because I’ve spent my entire life thinking that I’d be happier if I were thinner, because I’d be prettier and therefore more worthy of attention.

    Is it really any wonder that we feel this way? Despite the great work that the body positivity movement does, anyone who is currently an adult was raised with a strong message. Thin is beautiful. Thin is worthy. Thin is important.

    So it can hardly be a surprise that thin is what we value. But should we be keeping our mouths shut about that sense of inadequacy? Does admitting that many of us still wish we were thinner perpetuate the problem? Am I obliged to pretend that 14 is my dream dress size so that I don’t let down the sisterhood?

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    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Genuinely struggling to find answers, I asked body positive activist Stephanie Yeboah, who talks all sorts of sense about body image (and lots of other things) on her blog, what she thought.  She told me: ‘We shouldn’t feel guilty about they way in which our bodies look, period.

    ‘If you feel unhappy in how you look, you have to establish where that self-hate is coming from. Is it because you’ve been conditioned by society to think that thin = good and fat = bad? Do you deep down harvest fat phobic assumptions about what fat people can and cannot do? I think we live in a society now where we are slowly-but-surely trying to come to terms with loving our bodies in all its’ forms – which includes lumps, bumps, cellulite and stretch marks – all features on our bodies that cause no harm and are beautiful.

    Weight doesn’t make someone unattractive – it’s society’s attitudes surrounding weight gain that is unattractive. So you need to think whether you’re losing weight for yourself, or for other people.’

    And what about being body positive and still wanting to lose weight? Stephanie told me: ‘Body positivity is a movement that has been commodified and taken over by people whose bodies’ confirm to what society thinks it’s acceptable.

    It is not intersectual and inclusionary, and neglects the bodies that created it, so yes I definitely think there are people within the community who think they are body positive, yet still desire to lose the weight. That is not true body positivity in my eyes. For me, body positivity was supposed to represent acceptance of your fat body and all it’s flaws, and choosing to love the body you’re in, as opposed to wanting to change it to fit society’s standards.’

    So maybe for as long as I aspire to being a bit thinner, I don’t belong to the body positive world. And maybe that’s okay.

    Lots of high profile members of the body-positive movement talk about having hard times and struggling with their self esteem. But ultimately they strive to change their mindsets rather than their bodies.

    It feels, at least from the outside, that there’s no room within the Bo-Po community for trying to lose weight while loving yourself. It’s about loving your body as it is. And at the moment, I’m just not quite there.

    I hope one day I’ll feel different, but right now I see more wrong with my thighs than I do with the society which taught me my value was akin to my circumference. I’m going to keep working on that, but in the mean time I don’t think it’s fair to expect women to shut up about their body image, even if the desire to lose weight is at odds with being body positive.

    MORE: Grandma’s saucy 90th birthday cake might raise a few eyebrows

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    (Picture: Kendall-Jackson winery)

    A Californian wine company is petitioning Unicode, the governing body that sets the global coding standards, to introduce a white wine emoji.

    And to do so, they’ve sent in a 15-page proposal outlining why the existing glass of red wine emoji isn’t enough.

    ‘The existing wine glass emoji, depicted as a glass of red wine, does not properly represent one of the most popular and widely-consumed adult beverages – white wine,’ Kendall-Jackson says.

    ‘Today, wine is ubiquitous worldwide and evokes strong personal and emotional connections and opinions. In its simplest form, it boils down to “are you a red or white wine drinker?”‘

    Kendall-Jackson is a Sonoma County Chardonnay pioneer, and the company says that the rise of ‘post-truth’ has left people demanding to have their identity properly represented.

    ‘White wine is not just a popular category comprised of white grape varieties; it is a large part of people’s daily lives.

    ‘This all-important beverage with ancient beginnings should be properly illustrated in our modern international language of emoji.’

    To add weight to its campaign, the winery has now set up a campaign page, and it’s trying to get people to show their support for the idea by using #WhiteWineEmoji.

    ‘This won’t change the world but it will free you from using the red wine emoji when what you really want is a glass of Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc,’ it concludes.

    At the moment, alcoholic emojis are a Martini, a tiki cocktail, cups of saké, a whisky tumbler, two Champaign flutes, a glass of red, beer tankards and a champagne bottle.

    After this outstanding effort, however, a white wine glass definitely has to be coming soon.

    Kendall-Jackson asks people to check back on 2 August for an update, ahead of Nation White Wine Day in the states on 4 August.

    MORE: Mead is back with a new look and the ancient drink is not what you think it is

    MORE: Young men open up about the awkwardness of struggling to get an erection


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    (Picture: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health/PA)

    Charlie the donkey is helping to spread a little happiness to end-of-life care patients at a hospice in Cheshire.

    He’s spent his life giving kids the ride of their lives up and down Scarborough beach and now in his own retirement, the 10-year-old is helping those at the other end of the cycle.

    Charlie has been delivering ‘assistive therapy’ at St Ann’s Hospice in Cheadle, where he’s been nuzzling up to patients, carers and staff – and even poking his nose through bedroom windows so that bed-bound residents can meet him.

    While a donkey might seem a random choice of therapy animal, Adele Crompton, an equine coach at The Donkey Sanctuary, says that the animals are naturally in-tune with humans.

    ‘Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact,’ she says.

    ‘There’s something very pure about seeing an animal in front of you. There’s no judgement and it takes a lot of people back to their childhood.’

    Undated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health/PA)
    Undated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health/PA)

    One daycare patient who has been spending time with Charlie is Genevieve Grey, 80.

    ‘I’ve always loved animals,’ she says.

    ‘If I was able to, I’d have him to come to live with me and I’d build a shed or shelter for him.’

    The visit was arranged by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning, as part of an increased focus by health chiefs in the region to make palliative care more personalised.

    Undated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health/PA)
    Undated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health/PA)

    Eamonn O’Neil, chief executive of St Ann’s, says: ‘Everyone loves a donkey. There is something unique about these wonderful animals and the effect they have on people.

    ‘It was a pleasure to welcome Charlie and Adele to the hospice, and our patients, staff and volunteers loved meeting them.

    ‘Charlie was a real hit with everyone and his visit is proof that no two days are ever the same at St Ann’s.

    To find out about St Ann’s Hospice or make a donation visit http://www.sah.org.uk/donate-now.

    MORE: Woman shares her bedroom with a collection of snakes, including a 16ft python

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    Donkey helps buck up hospice patientsDonkey helps buck up hospice patientsmkylUndated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through Donkey helps buck up hospice patientsDonkey helps buck up hospice patientsmkylUndated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by Manchester Health and Care Commissioning (MHCC) of a patient and a donkey named Charlie, who is being used to give end-of-life care to patients through "assistive therapy". PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 30, 2018. Adele Crompton, an equine coach and co-ordinator at The Donkey Sanctuary, where Charlie now lives, said: "Donkeys have a natural emotional intelligence and react positively to human contact." See PA story HEALTH Donkey. Photo credit should read: Jon Parker Lee/Manchester Health and Care Commissioning/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

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    Metro Illustrations
    (Picture : Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Most of us are either morning people or evening people. 

    The unfortunate among us may find themselves in a relationship with someone who is dazzlingly chirpy before 7AM while they’d rather sleep until noon, or trying to stay awake until midnight when a 9PM bedtime would have been much nicer.

    But what does your sleep cycle say about your sex life?

    According to research from Pennsylvania State University, rather a lot.

    Dr Robert Matchock, who led the study, explained: ‘Eveningness for both men and women is associated with a more unrestricted sociosexuality [AN: that’s intellectual speak for slutting it up], which may stem from a broader suite of personality traits such as impulsivity or openness to experience.m Increases in sociosexuality may be subsumed into these traits as a lower level trait or a consequence of these behavioural traits.’

    So basically, night owls are more promiscuous than morning people.

    The study looked at 554 young adults – who didn’t know what the study was about. They answered a series of questions onthree elements of sociosexuality.

    They were asked about their attitude towards casual encounters, such as what they thought about sex without love, and their interest in engaging in, or their tendency to fantasise about, no strings attached sex.

    Ultimately the study found that in both men and women, night time people were more likely to be open towards casual sex, compared to morning types, and more likely to fantasise about strangers.

    So if you’re looking to lock it down with someone super monogamous, you should probably suggest that to them over an early morning coffee.

    MORE: Does being body positive mean pretending to like your body?

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    We'll never reach sexual equality if we don't stop obsessing over numbers
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for MEtro.co.uk)

    One of those conversations that come up again and again is how often we have sex. 

    Imagine the scene: you’re chatting to your friends, and one member of the group mentions that they’re having sex with their partner five or six times a week. ‘How about you?’ they ask.

    Now you’ve got three options:

    1. You could refuse to answer. It’s entirely within your rights to do but removing yourself from the conversation might not feel natural if they’re friends with whom you usually share intimate details
    2. You could tell the truth which, statistically, is likely to be fewer than five or six times a week (the UK average is thought to be  once every 2.7 days if you’re sexually active, though different studies will claim different numbers.)
    3. You could lie. Claim that you’re doing it as much as everyone else, or even more

    I think we all know the most tempting option.

    I’ve lied about how often I have sex. I’ve ’rounded up’ from three times a week to four. I’ve ignored the fact that there have been weeks when I didn’t feel like sex at all. I’ve said that I have sex every day, which is true when I’m ovulating and and enjoying chemically-induced arousal but very much not true when I’m on my period and feel about as sexy as an oozy wheel of Brie.

    Why? Sexaggeration.

    Unfortunately, sexaggeration has an inflation effect.

    Let’s say I round up my average of four or five times a week to six. That makes everyone else in the assembled company think that they’re having less sex than I am. So next time they’re asked the question, they up their real number a little bit.

    We end up with a situation where everyone is lying about how much sex they’re having and we all think we’re failing sexually.

    As soon as I opened up about not having had sex for the latter half of my honeymoon due to 40 degree heat and an unairconditioned apartment, the confessions came streaming out:

    What men think about to stop themselves coming
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    ‘I once went to the Maldives with a boyfriend and we didn’t have sex once,’ one woman in her mid 20s told me.

    Having noticed how my honesty prompted others to do the same, I decided to ask people if they’d ever lied about their sex lives, admitting that I’ve often been a little creative with my accounting while totting up how much sex I have.

    ‘Um, yes’ said one woman in her early 30s. ‘We used to do it four times a week when we were first going out so I just kept saying that we did it that often when obviously we don’t anymore. It’s been six years.’

    ‘We have sex a lot at the weekend,’ another woman, also early 30s told me. ‘But never in the week. And I don’t usually admit to that because it sounds so lame.’

    Why are we so bothered about what other people think of our sex lives?

    I see sex as a health check for my marriage, which is completely illogical because healthy marriages can be low on sex and unhappy marriages can be filled with raw animal passion.

    Despite knowing that, I have internalised the idea that how much sex you have is a direct reflection of how happy you are, which makes the idea of admitting to having a sexless week feel terrifying.

    I chatted to sexpert and author Annabelle Knight about sexaggeration.

    ‘Sexaggerating to friends is a completely pointless act that does nothing but give you a false sense of security in your relationship,’ she tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘If you’re lying about the amount of sex you have then it’s quite likely that you’d like more sex after all those that are content rarely feel the need to lie.

    ‘If this is the case then you should open up to your partner and talk about ways in which you can both be satisfied within the relationship.’

    So here’s the plan. Next time the topic comes up, try being honest.

    If it’s only once, and that once was amazing, say that. If you’ve been on your period or manic at work or just not feeling it, tell the truth.

    You might be surprised to find that your friends are in the exact same boat.

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    We'll never reach sexual equality if we don't stop obsessing over numbersWe'll never reach sexual equality if we don't stop obsessing over numbersrebeccacnreidWe'll never reach sexual equality if we don't stop obsessing over numbersWhat men think about to stop themselves comingWe'll never reach sexual equality if we don't stop obsessing over numbersWe'll never reach sexual equality if we don't stop obsessing over numbersrebeccacnreidWe'll never reach sexual equality if we don't stop obsessing over numbersWhat men think about to stop themselves coming

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    (Picture: insta_repeat/Instagram)

    Have a quick scroll through Instagram and you might be forgiven for thinking that you’ve seen most of the content before.

    Buddha bowls. Sausage legs. Cool-hats-looking-out-at-cool-landscapes.

    Truth is, you probably have seen almost identical posts before – as one account is proving.

    Insta Repeat is uploading montages of suspiciously similar photos found on the ‘gram.

    Running with the tagline ‘Déjà Vu Vibes; Wander. Roam. Replicate.’, the account has so far uploaded 81 compilations of unique travel photos.

    In each, seemingly remote, unique setups are placed in a 3×4 grid next to almost identical images – proving just how done all these artistic tropes are.

    You’ve got your boat back

    Instagram Photo

    Your tent hole

    Instagram Photo

    The ubiquitous little red cabins

    Instagram Photo

    Waterfalls

    Instagram Photo

    And woodland walks

    Instagram Photo

    Oh, and don’t forget the classic shot of someone standing on top of a Jeep

    Instagram Photo

    Or the old ‘photo of someone taking a photo’

    Instagram Photo

    It’s *almost* like the whole travel influencer game has been played out to death.

    The account is run by an anonymous 27-year-old from Alaska who tells Photoshelter that ‘a purpose of Insta Repeat is to critique originality in media creation through the lens (pun intended) of this one ‘genre’ of Instagram photography accounts’.

    And although her account does pose questions about the authenticity of these sorts of travel blogs and accounts, she maintains that Insta Repeat isn’t about criticising or belittling anyone; it’s more about exploring the choice people are making about images.

    After all, they’re all attractive photos in and of themselves but this kind of project does throw up interesting ideas about the notion of personal and historical creativity.

    MORE: Now that winter is back, enjoy these Icelandic ponies playing in the snow

    MORE: You might know big dick energy but have you heard about horse girl energy?


    Capture-aa9cCapture-aa9cmkylCapture-aa9cCapture-aa9cmkyl

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    (Picture: Jonathon Bucks/Twitter)

    When it comes to animal fashion, dogs tend to get all the attention.

    During the winter, every little pooch seems to have its own jacket. Owners spend thousands on outfits, make them Instagram famous and outfit them in headpieces, feather boas and badges.

    But did you know that some donkeys also have their own special sartorial style?

    It turns out that in certain parts of the world, donkeys are dressed in custom-made trousers in a bid to stop pesky flies from biting their legs.

    There’s still the unanswerable question of what the ‘right’ way for four-legged animals to wear trousers but we’ll leave that one for now.

    At the Donkey Sanctuary Of Canada, volunteer Sheila Zanyk made Ben a pair of trousers to stop the flies from bothering him. And it seems as though other animals are now getting something similar.

    ‘It took a few tries but it’s working well now,’ she tells CTVNews.ca.

    ‘The first time we put them on him, he was really proud of himself. He walked around the whole barnyard – just “look at me, look at me”.’

    After getting used to the sound of the velcro – which startled him at first – Ben now has two pairs of trousers and will be wearing them both until the winter season, when the flies finally buzz off.

    Over in Canada, donkey sanctuary volunteers kit animals out with four-legged slacks

    Which come in all kinds of snazzy prints

    To flatter all shades of noble steed

    While over on the Ile de Ren, in the south of France, donkeys are dressed in an altogether more European style of pant

    And no doubt, the trend will spread to donkeys in other countries in the near future.

    MORE: Meet Charlie, the donkey helping to buck up hospice patients

    MORE: Woman shares her bedroom with a collection of snakes, including a 16ft python


    Capture-3b2aCapture-3b2amkylCapture-3b2aCapture-3b2amkyl

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    (Picture: @chaltcev/Instagram)

    If you’ve been to or seen pictures of Santorini in Greece then you probably know how breathtaking it is.

    So when you take that and add a gorgeous woman wearing a stunning yellow dress, you’re left with a pretty glamorous shot.

    Alexandra Maye, a nurse, had some brilliant travel pictures taken while on holiday which is now being added to the viral hashtag  #Blackwomenontwitter.

    She spoke to Metro.co.uk about the magical photoshoot which was circulated and appreciated all over social media.

    METRO GRAB - taken from the Instagram of chaltcev with permission gained by Faima Stunning pics from Santorini Instagram/chaltcev
    (Picture: @chaltcev/Instagram)

    ‘My trip to Greece was a celebratory gift for graduating nursing school, passing my licensure exam, and concluding my term as president of a student nursing organisation,’ she explained.

    ‘Before going on the trip I researched things to do I came across various Santorini flying dresses. I knew I wanted to be part of such a fun and magical shoot.

    ‘I reached out to photographer Chaltcev Aleksandr and makeup artist Elina and they were so lovely to work with. They even showed my boyfriend who is a budding photographer how to capture the same great shots!’

    METRO GRAB - taken from the Instagram of chaltcev with permission gained by Faima Stunning pics from Santorini Instagram/chaltcev
    (Picture: @chaltcev/Instagram)

    Uploading the pictures on her Instagram, Alexandra told her followers an anecdote where a classmate told her she’d be more attractive if she had eurocentric features.

    Though she was hurt by the comments, she made an active effort to learn self-care and self-love. The Santorini photos were just proof of that, she told Metro.co.uk.

    ‘Seeing all of the positive comments on the viral tweet truly makes my heart smile. Self-love is a process and I’m so glad to genuinely love me and be able to have that shine through those photos.

    ‘It’s been so nice to see the comments and read the messages of people saying that I inspired them to love their dark skin. It’s been even nicer to receive text messages and calls from my baby cousins and family members saying that I’m making them proud.

    ‘Representation is important and by them learning to love the skin their in — I know I’ve made a positive impact.’

    On her Twitter, she wrote: ‘The people in Greece were looking at me like “Wakanda is real”.’

    We can definitely see the black girl magic.

    MORE: Greece is breeding new type of donkey because of overweight tourists visiting Santorini

    MORE: ‘When biryani meets joloff’: Interracial couple get a lot of love online


    Stunning pics from SantoriniStunning pics from Santorinifaimabakar1METRO GRAB - taken from the Instagram of chaltcev with permission gained by Faima Stunning pics from Santorini Instagram/chaltcevMETRO GRAB - taken from the Instagram of chaltcev with permission gained by Faima Stunning pics from Santorini Instagram/chaltcevStunning pics from SantoriniStunning pics from Santorinifaimabakar1METRO GRAB - taken from the Instagram of chaltcev with permission gained by Faima Stunning pics from Santorini Instagram/chaltcevMETRO GRAB - taken from the Instagram of chaltcev with permission gained by Faima Stunning pics from Santorini Instagram/chaltcev

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    food
    Busy as ever (Picture: Various)

    August 2018 is super quiet for new restaurant openings in London.

    You can chalk it down to the fact that everyone’s going on holiday, or the realities of the incredibly tough environment restaurateurs are operating in, but there’s no getting away from the fact that there are fewer openings this month, especially when you compare it to the flurry this time last year.

    But that doesn’t mean you’ll be short of options.

    So if you’ve already tried the top spots mentioned last month, here are all the best new and recent openings you need to know for August:

    bababoom
    (Picture: James Winspear Photography)

    BabaBoom, who opened their first restaurant in Battersea last year, are coming to Islington with their second site on August 7.

    All of their kebab favourites will make it north of the river, including their weekend brunch.

    But new to the site will be BabaBoom’s own beer, brewed by Belville Brewing co, as well as weekly-changing lunch-time specials.

    (Picture: Farmer J)
    (Picture: Farmer J)

    Farmer J, a breakfast and lunch-time favourite for City workers, is opening its first restaurant in London Bridge on August 20.

    The day-to-night venue will be serving up everything from coffees for morning commuters to cocktails for the after-work crowd.

    And for weekend visitors, there will even be brunch featuring shakshuka, bagel deli plates and more.

    Zuaya Restaurant for Roche Communications
    (Picture: Jodi Hinds)

    For fans of more creative cuisine, Kensington’s Zuaya is definitely worth checking out.

    The Latin American restaurant is headed up by chef Francisco Lafee, who has worked for reknowned Michelin-starred restaurants such as El Celler de Can Roca and Martin Berasategui.

    Instead of the Spanish fare that he’s largely been focusing on to date, the menu takes inspiration from the cuisines of Argentina, Mexico and Peru, and you’ll discover everything from robata octopus to Nikkei purple noodles.

    (Picture: Tish)
    (Picture: Tish)

    Belsize Park has a new kosher restaurant in the shape of Tish.

    The all-day menu is dairy-free, and you can indulge on Jewish baked goods like challahs and bagels.

    Every Friday, there’s also a special prix-fixe menu for those wishing to observe Shabbat.

    (Picture: Native)
    (Picture: Native)

    Fans of Native in Covent Garden will be happy to know that the team have finally completed their relocation to London Bridge.

    The philosophy has stayed much the same, with snacks made from off cuts and mains from what’s in season.

    New for the London Bridge site is a chef’s table, where diners can sup on an eight course tasting menu as they watch the chefs work.

    casa do frango
    (Picture: Elena Shamis)

    Forget about Nando’s for a minute – London Bridge has a new piri piri chicken restaurant.

    Casa do Frango’s version comes from the Algarves in Portugal and is as much about the special sauce (of course) as the cooking techniques.

    And after tucking into the spicy main, you’ll want to order one of their Portuguese egg tarts.

    Maple
    (Picture: Maple)

    The team behind the ever-popular The Botanist in Chelsea have opened up a new venue in White City.

    Maple offers a concise menu that features classics like roast chicken and linguine, alongside a handful of vegan options.

    And like its sister restaurants, there’s a big focus on drinks, with craft beers and rotating ales appearing on the drinks list with its crafted cocktails.

    (Picture: Manifesto Pizza)
    (Picture: Manifesto Pizza)

    Clapham isn’t short of pizzerias – especially the good and reasonably-priced kind – and now, Manifesto has joined their ranks.

    The pizzeria comes from the former director of posh grocers Natoora, and showcases just seven seasonal-changing options, including a gourmet number.

    There’s no dessert option, but with pizzas starting from just £6, you can always roam for an after-dinner treat.

    MORE: Where to eat in July: 10 new London restaurants you should check out

    MORE: Can delivery and takeaway food from Michelin-starred chefs ever deliver?

    MORE: Bar Fox: A hidden rum terrace, London’s best tacos and a detox-retox yoga vodka brunch


    Where to eat in AugustWhere to eat in Augustqinxiefoodbababoom(Picture: Farmer J)Zuaya Restaurant for Roche Communications(Picture: Tish)(Picture: Native)casa do frangoMaple (Picture: Manifesto Pizza)Where to eat in AugustWhere to eat in Augustqinxiefoodbababoom(Picture: Farmer J)Zuaya Restaurant for Roche Communications(Picture: Tish)(Picture: Native)casa do frangoMaple (Picture: Manifesto Pizza)

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    anorexia illustration
    Not everyone who has an eating disorder is under weight (Picture: Liberty Antonia Sadler for Metro.co.uk)

    ***CONTENT WARNING: Contains themes on eating disorders and suicidal thoughts, which some readers might find triggering.***

    It was a Wednesday morning in April 2016. I was on the Northern Line in rush hour, hot, slightly uncomfortable, with tears streaming down my face.

    I had got this down to a tee; I knew I could have my mask off for exactly 23 minutes, giving me time to apply my make-up, put on whatever top 40 song I could find on my iPod so that by the time I arrived in the office at 8.30am, I would look fine.

    This was my morning ritual ever since my grandma had passed away. Each day started the same.

    It was at that point, when I hit my lowest, that the voice came back.

    I hadn’t spoken to Anorexia for years but she knew when to prey on me. When I was at my weak point, desperate to stop feeling so sad, that’s when she would attack.

    Slowly but surely, she seduced me. Reassuring me. Taking away all that pain and sadness.

    When my mind started to think about my grandma, she distracted me and made things about her. About calories or exercise.

    I knew what was happening and that’s when, a few months later, I realised Anorexia couldn’t win.

    I knew my best bet of beating that voice again was to try and get some help. I needed to talk about how I felt, process the emotions in a healthy way and prevent this getting worse. So I did just that.

    I contacted my local mental health trust, had an appointment, and told them everything. It took every bit of energy to get myself to that appointment and to be honest when that anorexic voice was telling me not to share our dirty secrets.

    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    When I finished and looked at the lady, I was told, ‘We can’t do anything for you as you aren’t underweight’.

    My mind went in to overdrive, the anorexia ridiculed me. Laughing, teasing me. I left, unsure what to do next.

    What followed was four weeks of crying, wearing a mask, exercise, calorie counting and suicidal thoughts.

    I felt trapped in my own head, unsure how I was ever going to beat that anorexic voice. How I was ever going to be rid of it?

    How would I live my entire life like this?

    My mental state got so bad and the battle in my head with my anorexia became so strong that I came very close to ending my life altogether.

    My story isn’t unique.

    In fact, daily, people with eating disorders get turned away from support because they don’t fit the weight criteria.

    So often when we think about people with eating disorders, we imagine gaunt skeletal individuals. This is not the reality.

    Eating disorders come in all shapes and sizes. And yes, I am now a healthy weight, but does it mean my brain is 100% cured?

    No, is the honest truth – there are days when I still battle with that anorexic mindset and it is important we dispel the myth that eating disorders are all about weight and all about skinny people.

    That’s why I decided to launch the #DumpTheScales campaign.

    It has been amazing to see the numbers on the petition increase so rapidly over the first two weeks, and I am so grateful to everyone who got involved.

    But it also highlights this problem and the impact it has on so many.

    Just from scrolling through Twitter looking at the hashtag #DumpTheScales and through the comments on the campaign page, you can see thousands of stories from people affected.

    I have had countless more people get in touch to share their stories, from people who are turned away for not being underweight ‘enough’ for inpatient treatment, to people with bulimia who have nowhere to go to for support, to those who are in limbo as they don’t fit the criteria for weight at either inpatients or outpatients.

    Those suffering with anorexia can become obsessed with calorie counting
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    People with eating disorders are currently not getting a fair deal in society and this needs to change.

    Despite the guidance, too often, individuals are turned away from receiving essential support because they aren’t ‘skinny enough’ to be considered at risk.

    This can leave the individual feeling like they aren’t worth having that support, feeling like a ‘fake’, potentially losing more weight to hit that target and, in some cases, feeling suicidal.

    This is why we need to ensure that the NICE guidelines are being implemented effectively across the country.

    The guidelines are right but these are not being uniformly implemented across the nation to the detriment of thousands of people.

    It is time we stopped waiting for people to hit crisis point before offering them support. It is time we end the postcode lottery around diagnosis for eating disorders.

    We need to be able to make sure that people with eating disorders are getting the right support in a timely manner. And I need your help to make this happen.

    With 1.25 million people in the UK living with an eating disorder we can’t afford to wait any longer. The time to act is now.

    It takes just two minutes to sign the petition and your signature could help save someone’s life.

    You can sign the #DumpTheScales petiton here.

    MORE: Sleep and eating disorders: how anorexia haunted my dreams

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    MORE: My 16-year battle with anorexia: Sometimes it feels like I can never recover


    measureme_illustration_libertyantoniasadler-copy-95d1measureme_illustration_libertyantoniasadler-copy-95d1qinxieanorexia illustrationmetro illustrationsThose suffering with anorexia can become obsessed with calorie countingmeasureme_illustration_libertyantoniasadler-copy-95d1measureme_illustration_libertyantoniasadler-copy-95d1qinxieanorexia illustrationmetro illustrationsThose suffering with anorexia can become obsessed with calorie counting

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    *** ONLINE EMBARGO APPLIES: 00.01AM 30/07/2018 *** Pic by Michael Scott/Caters News - (PICTURED: Phil Shrimpton, 37 from Bassingbourne, Hertfordshire, is selling an Edition 1 copy of the Beano (pictured) for 25,000 pounds on eBay. The collector turned full-time comic seller, hopes to sell the childrens read which is one of only 30 known to have survived to the day. Pic taken 25/07/2018.) - A comic connesieur dubbed the worlds biggest Beano fan quit his job after making up to 25,000 pounds reading the mag over its 80-year history. Phil Shrimpton, 37, has been a big fan of Beano since first buying it with his pocket money aged 9 and over his lifetime has racked up a 2,500-strong collection. SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture:Michael Scott/Caters News)

    Remember the rumour that your Beanie Babies would be worth zillions in the future if you kept the labels on? 

    Well that might not have been quite true, but some childhood memorbillia are worth a lot (if you’ve got a Harry Potter first edition you’re in luck).

    One man who is doing pretty well of childhood items is 37 year old Phil Shrimpton who is selling a first issue of the Beano (which turns 80 today) for £25K.

    *** ONLINE EMBARGO APPLIES: 00.01AM 30/07/2018 *** Pic by Michael Scott/Caters News - (PICTURED: Phil Shrimpton, 37 from Bassingbourne, Hertfordshire, is selling an Edition 1 copy of the Beano for 25,000 pounds on eBay. The collector turned full-time comic seller, hopes to sell the childrens read which is one of only 30 known to have survived to the day. Pic taken 25/07/2018.) - A comic connesieur dubbed the worlds biggest Beano fan quit his job after making up to 25,000 pounds reading the mag over its 80-year history. Phil Shrimpton, 37, has been a big fan of Beano since first buying it with his pocket money aged 9 and over his lifetime has racked up a 2,500-strong collection. SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Michael Scott/Caters News)

    Phil, who is from from Bassingbourne, Hertfordshire, is a comic book collector turned full-time comic seller, hopes to sell the comic which is one of only 30 known to have survived to the day.

    Phil  has been a big fan of Beano since first buying it with his pocket money aged 9 and over his lifetime has racked up a 2,500-strong collection.

    The Beano turns 80 today and is still a hit with kids, with latest figures revealing 90,000 British children are viewing Beano content online every week and a copy of the comic is sold every 17 seconds in the UK.

    Beano facts

    1. The word ‘Beano’ is a shortened version of ‘Bean feast’, meaning ‘a rowdy jollification.’
    2. During the second world war paper shortages meant the comic was reduced to 12 pages every two weeks.
    3. Dennis’ canine companion Gnasher is drawn using Dennis’ hair and adding legs
    4. After the second world war, the Beano Editor’s name was discovered upon a Nazi assassination list for ‘gross disrespect’!
    5. For the first few episodes of his story, Dennis DIDN’T wear his famous red and black hooped jumper. His mum was still knitting it.
    6. For six weeks in 1986, Dennis’s famous Abyssinian Wire-Haired Tripe Hound, Gnasher went missing from the comic. He returned with six puppies.
    7. Dennis was originally sketched on the back of a fag packet, in a pub!
    8. There are only 20 surviving known copies of the first edition of Beano in the world
    9. It takes about 25 people to make a Beano comic including: artists, writers, colourists and graphic designers
    10. Lord Levison’s enquiry heard that ‘every newspaper apart from The Dandy and Beano’ was named in the investigation!

    If you’re trying to buy a house or pay off your student debt, why not have a flick through your grandparents loft and make sure they haven’t got an ancient Beano lying around.

    Phil’s advice for trying to make some cold hard cash off comics? ‘

    ‘A good place to start collecting is with the comic annuals – you can buy well read Beano or Dandy annuals from the 1950s or 1960s for as little as £50.But condition is key and you might have to pay £200 for an annual that is in pristine condition. The same goes for comics. If you want to buy as an investment, get the best quality you can afford.’

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    MORE: ‘Fat talk’ is stopping kids from being able to eat mindfully


    BEANO COLLECTOR ALL ROUNDERBEANO COLLECTOR ALL ROUNDERrebeccacnreid*** ONLINE EMBARGO APPLIES: 00.01AM 30/07/2018 *** Pic by Michael Scott/Caters News - (PICTURED: Phil Shrimpton, 37 from Bassingbourne, Hertfordshire, is selling an Edition 1 copy of the Beano (pictured) for 25,000 pounds on eBay. The collector turned full-time comic seller, hopes to sell the childrens read which is one of only 30 known to have survived to the day. Pic taken 25/07/2018.) - A comic connesieur dubbed the worlds biggest Beano fan quit his job after making up to 25,000 pounds reading the mag over its 80-year history. Phil Shrimpton, 37, has been a big fan of Beano since first buying it with his pocket money aged 9 and over his lifetime has racked up a 2,500-strong collection. SEE CATERS COPY*** ONLINE EMBARGO APPLIES: 00.01AM 30/07/2018 *** Pic by Michael Scott/Caters News - (PICTURED: Phil Shrimpton, 37 from Bassingbourne, Hertfordshire, is selling an Edition 1 copy of the Beano for 25,000 pounds on eBay. The collector turned full-time comic seller, hopes to sell the childrens read which is one of only 30 known to have survived to the day. Pic taken 25/07/2018.) - A comic connesieur dubbed the worlds biggest Beano fan quit his job after making up to 25,000 pounds reading the mag over its 80-year history. Phil Shrimpton, 37, has been a big fan of Beano since first buying it with his pocket money aged 9 and over his lifetime has racked up a 2,500-strong collection. SEE CATERS COPYBEANO COLLECTOR ALL ROUNDERBEANO COLLECTOR ALL ROUNDERrebeccacnreid*** ONLINE EMBARGO APPLIES: 00.01AM 30/07/2018 *** Pic by Michael Scott/Caters News - (PICTURED: Phil Shrimpton, 37 from Bassingbourne, Hertfordshire, is selling an Edition 1 copy of the Beano (pictured) for 25,000 pounds on eBay. The collector turned full-time comic seller, hopes to sell the childrens read which is one of only 30 known to have survived to the day. Pic taken 25/07/2018.) - A comic connesieur dubbed the worlds biggest Beano fan quit his job after making up to 25,000 pounds reading the mag over its 80-year history. Phil Shrimpton, 37, has been a big fan of Beano since first buying it with his pocket money aged 9 and over his lifetime has racked up a 2,500-strong collection. SEE CATERS COPY*** ONLINE EMBARGO APPLIES: 00.01AM 30/07/2018 *** Pic by Michael Scott/Caters News - (PICTURED: Phil Shrimpton, 37 from Bassingbourne, Hertfordshire, is selling an Edition 1 copy of the Beano for 25,000 pounds on eBay. The collector turned full-time comic seller, hopes to sell the childrens read which is one of only 30 known to have survived to the day. Pic taken 25/07/2018.) - A comic connesieur dubbed the worlds biggest Beano fan quit his job after making up to 25,000 pounds reading the mag over its 80-year history. Phil Shrimpton, 37, has been a big fan of Beano since first buying it with his pocket money aged 9 and over his lifetime has racked up a 2,500-strong collection. SEE CATERS COPY

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