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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    Brought the dog out to the park in her new shoe. She was so delighted as she runs around with it.
    (Picture: Getty)

    You know what’s a horrible feeling?

    Stepping on to tarmac or hot sand with no shoes on and having absolutely no relief or anywhere to sit. Hopping foot to foot, feeling them burn and knowing you can do nothing until you run into the sea or sit down or pop your flip flops back on.

    Swiss police are well aware of how horrible it is to walk around barefoot on boiling tarmac, so they’re urging dog owners to buy dog shoes for their four-legged pals to protect them in high temperatures.

    A long-haired chihuahua standing on the side of a roadway in front of a snow bank wearing yellow booties on a bright winter day
    (Picture: Keith Getter/Getty)

    While dogs’ feet are tougher than ours, it still hurts them to walk around barefoot in the heat – so according to public broadcaster SRF, police are launching the Hot Dog campaign to educate dog owners on how to protect their best pals.

    The heatwave means that Switzerland has had one of their hottest summers since records began, and 30 degrees can feel like 50-55 on the ground.

    Zurich police spokesperson Michael Walker said: ‘When a dog walks on hot asphalt, he can burn his feet – just like a human walking barefoot.’

    They are also advising that owners don’t leave dogs in hot cars, and give them plenty of water.

    The campaign includes photos of their service dogs wearing shoes, which many of them do to protect their feet and surfaces they touch.

    So, dog owners – before you head out on your walk, ponder getting your pooch their own pair of shoes. Not only do they look adorable, but they’ll help to protect their feet from burns.

    MORE: How to keep your indoor cat cool in the summer

    MORE: Why your cat isn’t eating much in the hot weather

    MORE: How are you coping in the extreme heat? Share your heatwave photos, videos and tips with us


    Happy dog with new shoeHappy dog with new shoefebruarystationeryBrought the dog out to the park in her new shoe. She was so delighted as she runs around with it.A long-haired chihuahua standing on the side of a roadway in front of a snow bank wearing yellow booties on a bright winter dayHappy dog with new shoeHappy dog with new shoefebruarystationeryBrought the dog out to the park in her new shoe. She was so delighted as she runs around with it.A long-haired chihuahua standing on the side of a roadway in front of a snow bank wearing yellow booties on a bright winter day

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    Coming from a privileged background where I went to a private school, money was never really an issue for me as a child.

    However, the strive for perfection and the pressure to be the best I could be was, and life was very intense from as early as I can remember.

    My perfect childhood caved in at the age of 15 when my parents got divorced. I was embroiled in an ugly, acrimonious divorce, which I later discovered damaged me much more than I thought.

    All the aspirations and dreams I had as a child were thwarted and I went to work in the city at 16 instead of going to university as planned.

    It was at this stage of my life that I started to control my eating, which later developed into anorexia.

    I also started taking substances to anaesthetise my feelings and emotions, including stealing my mother’s prescription medication (valium) and her cigarettes at any opportunity from the age of 15.

    The first drug I took was ecstasy, when I was abroad with friends around 16 to 17. Marijuana and speed swiftly followed. And as I was already dancing in clubs to earn some extra cash, the speed kept me awake and allowed me to be in control of my weight.

    At 18, I was introduced to cocaine and I quickly started using this in a habitual manner and would run around for local dealers in Essex nightclubs as I learnt I could get my fix for free that way.

    Shortly after, the ‘party’ drugs came into the mix.

    man taking cocaine
    (Picture: Getty)

    Between the ages of 18 to 22, I started experimenting with cocaine, ecstasy, speed, MDMA and marijuana, and this would take place most weekends.

    At 23, I moved from east London to south London and started to work part-time in nightclubs to help pay household bills and my mortgage.

    At the time, it was all an amazing experience and I made lots of new friends.

    During this time, I regularly partied hard and for most of the weekend, from Friday evening until Sunday afternoon with no proper sleep.

    I’m very lucky because through all of my using, I managed to hold down jobs. Only now, in sobriety, I question how reliable and efficient I really was.

    I always lived for the weekend, and the chance to let my hair down and escape from the real world.

    As well as the drugs that I’ve already listed, my recreational using evolved and I moved on to crystal meth, ketamine and GHB.

    During the whole of my 20s and early 30s, I worked on the London scene for both gay and straight events and I was lucky enough to have lived in Madrid and Ibiza.

    I flew around the world visiting different parties and events, always ensuring I either travelled with the drugs I wanted or the drugs were delivered to me on arrival wherever I went.

    During this time, I lost many friends to drugs – many died and it was common place to hear of another fatality on the London gay scene.

    But losing friends didn’t seem to stop me wanting to continue to use, and throughout all of this time, I was very confident that I was in control; and the drugs didn’t stop coming and I certainly didn’t stop wanting to take them.

    I was first introduced to crystal meth when I was 25, and initially it was just another substance to add to the mix.

    But having been sheltered from how raw some of the London gay scene had become by being in two long term relationships, both of which were massively drug-fuelled, I found myself submerged in a scene that was very different from when I was previously single.

    It had appeared to have gone very underground, with many people smoking crystal meth.

    The apps were awash with the offers of sex and ‘slamming’ parties, most of which lasted the majority of the weekend. I quickly embraced this new era.

    At this point, being 37, emotionally in a dark place and after taking drugs for close to 23 years, I was offered crystal intravenously and I didn’t say no.

    Being part of this new and hedonistically exciting ‘chemsex’ world was fun at first, but at the same time extremely dangerous.

    The dangers of chemsex

    • Injecting drug users are at increased risk to receive and transmit Hepatitis C and HIV through shared needles, known as ‘slamming’
    • More likely to engage in high-risk sexual behaviour
    • Higher risk of long-term drug dependency
    • Feeling exhausted or paranoid due to lack of food and sleep
    Source: Chelsea & Westminster Hospital / Avert

    People didn’t seem to care about each other, who they slept with or, more importantly, about themselves.

    Looking back, it was one of the scariest times of my life.

    I first injected crystal meth in November 2016, and from November 2016 to August 2017, I must have injected close to 10 times, at different parties with different people, as well as regularly taking the same substances that I had taken for many years.

    person injecting drugs
    (Picture: Getty)

    My drug use had seriously spiralled out of control. Being a part of this world made all my inhibitions, barriers and boundaries fall by the wayside, and I allowed extremely dangerous people close to me.

    Due to my vulnerability, I was massively taken advantage of, and this ended with me being arrested – causing worry, upset and anguish to those closest to me.

    I first engaged a drugs counsellor some five years earlier as I thought I ‘may be taking too much’, but towards the end, I was extremely lucky to get the funding from my local borough for private care.

    After five months with a care manager back in August 2017, I was sent to a care home for three months, followed by reintegration housing for a further six.

    I haven’t looked back since, and have completed the 12 steps with a sponsor and relocated during what has been the best summer weather-wise in years.

    I am working again, doing voluntary work – I launched a peer-led group in association with an addiction charity for members who are in recovery within the LGBTQ + community – as well as studying, so it’s full on. But I am extremely happy indeed to have my life back.

    As I approach my first year clean and sober, I’m proud of where I have got to and so extremely grateful for the people who have helped me along the way.

    And now I want to help, support and give back in any way I can to the community and the people who need it the most, and as I can relate to so many, I hope it may make it easier for some to reach out.

    The best piece of advice I can give is anyone can change their lives if they want to.

    From my experience, what started as fun – when substances are misused/abused just like the way I misused them – soon becomes serious and your fate may very well be the same as mine and it could really only be a matter of time.

    I’m lucky to have come out of the other side alive and able to share my story of experience, strength and hope for anyone who wants to listen.

    If there is anyone reading this who can identify and thinks that they’re ready for a new way of life, Streetscene can help you change and help is never too far away.

    Need support? Contact Talk to Frank

    If you need information on how to get help or support, you can email or call Talk to Frank on 0300 123 6600. You can also text via 82111 or join the live chat online between 2pm to 6pm. 

    (Top picture: Erin Aniker for Metro.co.uk)

    MORE: How to help a family member who’s suffering from addiction

    MORE: Gaming addiction is real – because of it I lost my family, my job and my home

    MORE: I lost everything because of my drinking – but even then it was hard to stop


    Metro IllustrationsMetro Illustrationsqinxieman taking cocaineperson injecting drugsMetro IllustrationsMetro Illustrationsqinxieman taking cocaineperson injecting drugs

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    A mum-of-two has recently rediscovered her 43-year-old childhood doll – and it’s creeping out the internet.

    Nina, originally from Leeds but now living in the US, recently returned to her childhood home in West Yorkshire and found the 1970s toy, named Gilly, in a box.

    She was surprised to find that it was still in working condition – as the blonde haired, blue eyed doll still winks, grins and grimaces when its left arm is rotated.

    A video of the doll’s facial contortions has been shared thousands of times on Twitter, though people can’t decide whether it’s cool or whether it should be burned.

    The clip of the Saucy Expressions Doll, brought out by Mattel in 1972, was tweeted by GammaCounter, who wishes to be known only as Alan from Chicago.

    Alan, Nina and their two children visit the UK annually but during this year’s trip the toy, bought in 1975, was rediscovered.

    A MUM-of-two rediscovered her 43-year-old childhood doll - and now it's totally creeping out the internet. The woman, originally from Leeds but now living in the US, recently returned to her childhood home in West Yorkshire and found the 1970s toy in a box. And to her amazement she discovered that the blonde-haired, blue-eyed doll still winks, grins and grimaces when its left arm is rotated. A video of the doll's facial contortions has proved a massive hit on social media - dividing opinion between those who think it cool and those who have urged: "Burn it." The clip of the Saucy Expressions Doll, brought out by Mattel in 1972, was tweeted by GammaCounter, who wishes to be known only as Alan from Chicago. Alan, his British-born wife and their two children visit the UK annually but during this year's trip the toy, bought in 1975, was rediscovered.
    (Picture: Deadline News)

    Alan’s daughter quickly fell in love with her mum’s old doll.

    Alan posted the short clip to Twitter with the caption: ‘My wife found her childhood doll amongst a bunch of old stuff. Look at the range of emotions it goes through.

    The clip has been viewed over 175,000 times and had over 5,000 likes and 1,600 retweets since being uploaded on 1 August.

    The clip begins with the blonde doll smiling, but as Alan rotates her left arm the doll’s eyes begin to move from left to right – and her mouth begins to open.

    As Alan continues to rotate the arm, Gilly winks and her mouth is squished up into a strange expression.

    The doll’s expressions continue to change, and as her eyes move off to the side her mouth begins to turn down in to a wary expression.

    A MUM-of-two rediscovered her 43-year-old childhood doll - and now it's totally creeping out the internet. The woman, originally from Leeds but now living in the US, recently returned to her childhood home in West Yorkshire and found the 1970s toy in a box. And to her amazement she discovered that the blonde-haired, blue-eyed doll still winks, grins and grimaces when its left arm is rotated. A video of the doll's facial contortions has proved a massive hit on social media - dividing opinion between those who think it cool and those who have urged: "Burn it." The clip of the Saucy Expressions Doll, brought out by Mattel in 1972, was tweeted by GammaCounter, who wishes to be known only as Alan from Chicago. Alan, his British-born wife and their two children visit the UK annually but during this year's trip the toy, bought in 1975, was rediscovered.
    (Picture: Deadline News)

    The doll then pops back in to a smile, crosses its eyes and opens its mouth in excitement.

    As the clip ends, a simple wink creates a strange expression on the doll’s face – as one side of her mouth moves upwards while the other moves downwards.

    The final expression shows both sides of the doll’s mouth facing down again as it looks wary, and Alan moves the doll in to camera to make social media users laugh.

    Yes, it’s cool that a doll can show that many emotions. But it’s super weird to watch.

    Since the video was posted, it’s had lots of replies from uncomfortable users:

    Alan says that while he and his family love the doll, they all agree it’s creepy’.

    ‘My daughter and her twin brother, they are seven, sometimes like to play on that angle,’ he said.

    ‘So I think that is part of the dynamic, maybe a kind of strange attraction, or something like that.’

    He added: ‘It must have been tucked away for many years in her parents’ house. We live in the US, but visit the UK at least once a year.

    ‘This year, the doll turned up in the course of going through boxes of things. Our daughter loves the doll, and wishes to keep it.’

    Honestly, if we found that doll lurking around in an old box, we’d tape up the box and leave it there forever.

    However, we’d definitely take it out if it was still in its original packaging – as they’re now selling online for around £230.

    MORE: 13 ways to practise self-care when you’re a busy parent

    MORE: Mum has to bathe her baby in bleach every other day to stop her scaly skin getting infected


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    Nike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutes
    (Picture: Nike)

    Here’s a treat for the self-proclaimed hypebeasts among us – although it’s one you’ll have needed rapid reactions for.

    The new Off-White x Nike Air Presto’s from Virgil Abloh’s 2017 collection The Ten were released this morning: a reimagining of ten classic Nike designs by the much lauded designer.

    Last week witnessed the drop of the all-black version of the collab, which predictably enough sold out almost immediately after release.

    And it was exactly the same story this morning as the new batch dropped- this time in all-white. The ‘sold out’ sign was flashing after a matter of minutes, a crying shame for any streetwear obsessives that didn’t manage to smash their card details through the Nike checkout in time.

    On a design level, the shoes boast a ‘T-shirt-like fit’ with comfort at the forefront of the bold,eye-catching details like the stitched Swoosh, an orange tag, a white lace cage and a Velcro strap at the heel that is embellished with Virgil’s iconic ‘Air’ motif.

    You’ve missed your chance to snaffle a pair from this morning, over at the Nike store, so your best bet is probably Ebay if you’re still keen.

    Or just gaze at the photos below and dream of having those sweet kicks on your feet.

    Nike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutes
    (Picture: Nike)
    Nike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutes
    Caption: Nike and Off-White’s latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutes
    Photographer: Anas Chowdhury
    Provider: Nike
    Nike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutes
    Caption: Nike and Off-White’s latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutes
    Photographer: Anas Chowdhury
    Provider: Nike

     

     

     


    SEI_24021857-c113SEI_24021857-c113franciscogarcia92Nike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutesNike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutesNike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutesNike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutesSEI_24021857-c113SEI_24021857-c113franciscogarcia92Nike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutesNike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutesNike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutesNike and Off-White's latest trainer collaboration tipped to sell-out in minutes

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    Girl's tweet about her boyfriend shows you should always shoot your shot
    (Picture: Twitter/@ayekelliann)

    A couple have filled our hearts with so much joy by sharing their love story on Twitter.

    Kelliann recently shared her dating story to Twitter, explaining that she’d always had a crush on her now-boyfriend but had been too nervous to do anything about it.

    Once college was over, she decided to shoot her shot and tell him how she felt – and it paid off.

    In the tweet, Kelliann wrote: ‘I spent a whole semester of freshman year crushing on him till I finally got the balls to make a move and it was the best decision I have ever made #shootyourshot’.

    The pictures tweeted showed a conversation between her and her partner Chris, discussing hanging out for the first time after never having spoken before.

    The following pictures showed happy times from their relationship together.

    The tweet received more than 6,000 retweets and 49,000 likes – and so many other people have come forward to share their very similar stories.

    This couple met after being in the same sociology class together

     

    This epic love story started in college

     

    This adorable pair have been together for three years

    It took six months, but this couple finally got out of the friend zone

    Honestly, we don’t think there’s any other Twitter thread that’s warmed our hearts as much as this one.

    Isn’t love just great?

    MORE: Commitmentphobia: Why millennials don’t want to settle for one person

    MORE: The vegan hair salon guide to London


    Girl's tweet about her boyfriend shows you should always shoot your shotGirl's tweet about her boyfriend shows you should always shoot your shothattiegladwellmetroGirl's tweet about her boyfriend shows you should always shoot your shotGirl's tweet about her boyfriend shows you should always shoot your shotGirl's tweet about her boyfriend shows you should always shoot your shothattiegladwellmetroGirl's tweet about her boyfriend shows you should always shoot your shot

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    (Picture: Poundland)

    Author and podcaster Bethany Rutter took to Twitter today to express her disgust that budget retailer Poundland is selling Forza appetite suppressant capsules, and accused them of ‘normalising extreme dieting’.

    The product is described as containing a ‘plant-based slimming formula to support safe and healthy weight loss’ that will ‘suppress appetite and reduce food intake’.

    The appetite suppressant pills are stored in the same section as general medicines, including cold remedies.

    On Twitter, Rutter raised questions about whether it’s appropriate to deal with hunger in the way you would manage a cough, cold or headache.

    The pills in question are also shown at a child’s height, rather than on the top shelf with other products marketed at adults.

    Last year, the Youth Select Committee told MPs that body dissatisfaction can start in girls as young as six and puts children and young people at risk of depression, anxiety and eating disorders.

    Research carried out by Dove in 2017 showed that more than half (53%) of girls in the UK have stopped taking part in activities because they are so unhappy with the way they look.

    The charity Beat estimates that 1.25 million people in Britain are currently suffering from an eating disorder. They have found cases of anorexia in children of six years old.

    Beat’s Director of External Affairs, Tom Quinn, told Metro.co.uk: ‘Eating disorders are mental illnesses with complex causes, so it is unlikely that these products would be the sole and direct reason for someone developing one.

    ‘However, we know that appetite suppressants are used by people with restrictive eating disorders like anorexia, and feel it is harmful to widely distribute and promote such products.

    ‘While people can develop an eating disorder at any point in life, we know that teenagers are particularly affected by anorexia, and we urge companies and individuals who market to this age group to consider the implications of their marketing for vulnerable people.’

    Poundland had not responded to our request for comment at the time of publication.

    MORE: The reality of dealing with your ‘recovered’ body after an eating disorder

    MORE: Demand for private counselling soars due to long NHS waiting lists


    POUNDLAND_001-2370POUNDLAND_001-2370hpwilliamsonPOUNDLAND_001-2370POUNDLAND_001-2370hpwilliamson

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    (Picture: The Trussell Trust/Alexandra Smart)

    The summer holiday. It should be a time for fun but for many families across our country, breaking up from school can be the difference between just getting by and needing a foodbank’s help.

    Over a third of the emergency food our network provides throughout the year goes to children, but during the summer we see a particular pinch point for families already struggling with tight budgets and now facing extra financial pressure to provide main meals during the school holidays.

    Last year’s report from The All Party Parliamentary Group on Hunger estimated the loss of free school meals during the holidays adds between £30 and £40 a week to parents’ outgoings.

    We see the impact in foodbanks across the UK. Last July and August, over 74,000 supplies were provided by foodbanks in our network to children, compared to 70,000 in May and June of the same year.

    This is not okay. No one should face going hungry, and although our network will be doing all they can this summer to help families struggling to make the money they have stretch to cover the essentials, no charity can replace people having enough money for the basics.

    As a nation, there are two things we must do.

    We owe it to each other to make sure sufficient financial support is in place when we need it most.

    Firstly, we need to make sure that any of us at risk of going hungry this summer get vital support.

    We’re asking the public to check with their local foodbank to see what donations are most needed in their area this summer, so projects on the frontline can give help to everyone referred.

    Whilst food donations are crucial for meeting immediate need during the holidays, foodbanks cannot, and must not, be a long-term solution to hunger.

    The second thing we must do is look to the future and bring about structural changes that protect families from poverty.

    The Department for Education recently announced a pilot scheme which means community groups that run certain projects – like holiday clubs that provide meals and activities for families – can apply for government funding to do this work in the holidays.

    This is a great first step and will have a real, measurable impact on children across the country.

    At the same time, we must not lose sight of the underlying issues that leave families needing foodbanks. To truly tackle hunger at any time of year we have to ensure every family in the UK has enough money coming in to cover essential costs.

    We owe it to each other to make sure sufficient financial support is in place when we need it most. That’s why we’re asking for the benefit freeze to be lifted and payments to be up-rated in line with inflation to ensure payments keep pace with the cost of living, particularly for families with children.

    We know particular groups of people are more likely to need a foodbank, particularly single parents and families with kids.

    So let’s make sure no one is swept into destitution. Our benefits system can, and must, act as an anchor to protect people from being pulled into poverty.

    How to help

    The Trussel Trust is running a Summer Appeal to help families through the summer holidays and beyond.

    Find your local foodbank here and read information about other ways to donate here.

    MORE: As a new mum I mourned my inability to breastfeed

    MORE: We can’t shy away from racial inequality in the fight against child poverty

    MORE: 13 ways to practise self-care when you’re a busy parent


    Foodbank 2-8c15Foodbank 2-8c15rmve86Foodbank 2-8c15Foodbank 2-8c15rmve86

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    It’s International Beer Day and the perfect time to challenge your taste buds with some creative craft beer offerings.

    Craft beer continues to take the UK by storm, with more bars and pubs than ever adding craft ales, stouts and saisons to their menu.

    The definition of what makes a craft beer has not been fully settled upon, but James Watt and Martin Dickie, creators of craft beer powerhouse Brewdog, argue that a European craft brewery should always be small, independent, transparent about the ingredients used, and brewiing all beers at their original gravity, without cost cutting adjuncts like rice or corn.

    Craft beer is the antidote to industrially brewed lagers that are ubiquitous in supermarkets and boozers alike.

    Independent craft breweries have more freedom to push boundaries and produce small runs of wacky, left-field offerings than big retailers, and they’ve certainly got the creativity to match this flexibility.

    There are plenty of incredibly drinkable and easily session-able craft beers on the market, but innovative breweries are also challenging our palettes with increasingly unusual tastes.

    We’ve chosen some of the more memorable bevs that you can sample this weekend, but remember – you might not be able to neck these all night!

    Sour Mormora, 5.3%

    (Picture: Cloudwater)

    This coffee-infused kettle sour beer from from Cloudwater Brewing Co. was produced in collaboration with Square Mile Coffee Roasters.

    The hot and cold sides of the brewing process were infused with espresso and filter roasts of Mormora for a truly caffeine-rich experience.

    Sriracha Hot Stout Beer, 5.7%

    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Rogue Sriracha Hot Stout Beer
    (Picture: ratebeer.com)

    Not for the faint of heart, this spicy Sriracha-inspired stout is sure to bring a glow to your cheeks.

    It’s made with Huy Fong original hot chili sauce and whether you want to spice up a noodle dish or wash down some pizza, this beer has a fiery kick.

    Of the Sea, 7%

    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Wild Beer Co - OF THE SEA
    (Picture: wildbeerco.com)

    The Wild Beer Co. have truly outdone themselves with this lobster bisque-inspired beer that even has the frothy texture of sea-foam.

    The brewing process involves cockles, lobsters, two kinds of seaweeds and sea herbs. If you’re not put off yet, it’s also seasoned with Cornish sea salt, star anise and saffron.

    With a hint of brininess in the taste, Wild Beer truly have brought the sea to the beer glass.

    Flat White Breakfast Stout, 7.4%

    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Alphabet Brewing Co. ??? Flat White ??? Stout
    (Picture: honestbrew.co.uk)

    If you’re waking up and diving straight into a can of this ‘breakfast’ beer, we can only assume that you’re trying to booze your way through a hangover, or you’re a little too eager to get the party started.

    This intense stout from Alphabet Brewing combines coffee, milk and oats with a distinct malty taste.

    Imperial Lord Smog Almighty, 11%

    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Imperial Lord Smog Almighty
    (Picture: beavertownbrewery.co.uk)

    Aptly named, this porter is so smoky that you’ll need a gasp of fresh air after drinking.

    It smells wonderfully fudgey, chocolatey and malty, and the taste is of open fires, liquorice, peat and whisky.

    It’s the smoky beer equivalent of a worn leather armchair next to a wood-burning stove.

    Yellow Belly Peanut Butter Biscuit Imperial Stout, 11%

    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market YELLOW BELLY PEANUT BUTTER BISCUIT IMPERIAL STOUT
    (Picture: Buxton Brewery)

    Don’t be put off by the packaging, Yellow Belly is made by Buxton Brewery in collaboration with Stockholm-based Omnipollo as part of Siren Craft Brew’s Rainbow Project challenge.

    Seven pairs of brewers drew colours out of a hat and were challenged to make a beer that matched.

    In a time of political turbulence, Buxton and Omnipollo made a ‘yellow’ beer and dressed it in the ‘most hateful, cowardly-anonymous costume we know of’.

    It tastes of chocolate and nuts, and is meant to be enjoyed ‘as a celebration of all things new, open minded and progressive’.

    CapHeine Coffee Sour with Hibiscus, 6.2%

    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Siren ??? CapHeine Coffee Sour with Hibiscus
    (Picture: honestbrew.co.uk)

    Another coffee sour, this time from Siren Craft Brew and using a Costa Rican ‘Dragon’ brew, filled with tart berry notes

    After the success of last year’s CapHeine debut, SCB have decided to leave the raspberries out so that the hibiscus infusion can really come to the forefront.

    Bourbon BA Christmas Cake Stout, 12.8%

    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market BOURBON BA CHRISTMAS CAKE STOUT
    (Picture: cloudwaterbrew.co)

    It’s entirely unseasonal, but you can buy the bourbon barrel-aged version of Cloudwater’s collaboration with To Øl, matured on sticky glace cherries.

    The stout is zesty, rich and fragrant, just like a boozy slice of Christmas cake should be.

    Obviously, beer should be consumed responsibly, whether it’s craft or not.

    MORE: Raw oysters are alive when you eat them

    MORE: PETA isn’t backing the vegan burger that ‘bleeds’


    A taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the marketA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the markethpwilliamsonA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Rogue Sriracha Hot Stout BeerA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Wild Beer Co - OF THE SEAA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Alphabet Brewing Co. ??? Flat White ??? StoutA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Imperial Lord Smog AlmightyA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market YELLOW BELLY PEANUT BUTTER BISCUIT IMPERIAL STOUTA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Siren ??? CapHeine Coffee Sour with HibiscusA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market BOURBON BA CHRISTMAS CAKE STOUTA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the marketA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the markethpwilliamsonA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Rogue Sriracha Hot Stout BeerA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Wild Beer Co - OF THE SEAA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Alphabet Brewing Co. ??? Flat White ??? StoutA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Imperial Lord Smog AlmightyA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market YELLOW BELLY PEANUT BUTTER BISCUIT IMPERIAL STOUTA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market Siren ??? CapHeine Coffee Sour with HibiscusA taste of some of the weird and wonderful craft beers on the market BOURBON BA CHRISTMAS CAKE STOUT

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    (Picture: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)

    There are so many words to describe women who don’t have children. Personally I’ve taken to calling myself a non-mum.

    I have chosen not to have children, and as a non-mum I often look to other women, those in the spotlight, for some camaraderie on not being part of the mum crowd.

    And one of the women who always speaks truth to me is Jennifer Aniston.

    So when I read her latest comments about not having children, I immediately related. In an interview with InStyle, Jen commented that women who do not start a family are considered ‘damaged goods’.

    I know exactly what she means. As a non-mum I have witnessed and experienced shaming for my choice, and I know she does, too, on a world scale. Just like ‘Poor Kylie’ can’t find love, ‘Poor Jennifer’ is lacking somehow because she’s not a parent.

    Never mind her acting CV, what ‘really’ matters is that she’s not a mummy, right?

    For me, ‘damaged goods’ feels like she is saying that a woman who hasn’t had a family is seen as in some way incomplete, that we ‘non-mums’ haven’t fulfilled a life goal that is in some way imperative.

    That by not having children we are either physically or mentally deficient in some way as women. This is hurtful on so many levels. And I can’t imagine how it feels for those who cannot have children.

    For the record, I adore kids. And not just my niblings (a new word I learned, for nieces and nephews – cute, eh?).

    Friends’ children and I have such a fun time messing around. A friend had a baby in February and I just love her to bits. I love being Aunty Jenny but I also love walking away at the end of the day and focusing on me again.

    Is that selfish? Am I, and Jennifer, and the women like us, selfish because we don’t want to be mums? Even if we are, it’s not fair to see us as ‘damaged goods’.

    I do feel emotionally lacking, sometimes, that I don’t have the urge to be a mum but I can’t have a baby just in case.

    I don’t think, though, that it’s other mums who see us this way. Far from it – most of my friends have all said one time or another how lucky I am to be a non-mum. No, I think it’s the wider world that sees women like Jennifer and me like that.

    For example, in my industry, being a mum is big business with special branded newsletters and articles all for mums.

    As a journalist, there are often shout outs for mums to write opinion pieces or debate topics on TV. I know they are catering to a certain audience, and of course mums need support.

    The mum shaming can hit at any time. For example, a couple of weeks ago a nurse was doing a blood test for me.

    Telling her to avoid the implant in my arm, she said: ‘Won’t you wish you’d had children when you’re old and lonely?’. I know she meant well but the shame made me embarrassed and angry.

    Jennifer and I are not alone, either. Take, for instance, the Wimbledon women’s final.

    Watching Angelique Kerber lift the trophy, I suddenly balked at the commentary. ‘Well, she’s not a mum like Serena, but she’s cradling that trophy like a baby’.

    Serena Williams is a great role model for mums (and non mums), no doubt.

    But where’s the good in calling out Kerber for not being a mum? Wow, she won even though she hasn’t procreated?

    That’s the ‘damaged goods’ label right there.

    And the world is ‘non-mum shaming’ Meghan Markle, too, commenting from the moment she tied the knot about whether she’ll have kids.

    Heaven forbid she’s allowed to settle into married life. No, she’s put straight on the ‘will she have kids?’ pedestal with people tweeting about how she’ll make an ‘excellent mum’ because she’s got a rapport with kids (she was photographed bending down to talk to Isabella Dyer at a polo match).

    Choosing not to be a mum isn’t always easy. Some days I do wonder if I’ll regret it. I do feel emotionally lacking, sometimes, that I don’t have the urge to be a mum.

    But I can’t have a baby just in case, so in the meantime, I’d like to not be shamed for that choice. To not be seen as damaged goods, like Jennifer says.

    MORE: Jennifer Aniston ‘fantasises’ about Friends coming back: ‘It was the greatest job I ever had’

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    WE Day California To Celebrate Young People Changing The WorldWE Day California To Celebrate Young People Changing The WorldsaintallardWE Day California To Celebrate Young People Changing The WorldWE Day California To Celebrate Young People Changing The Worldsaintallard

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    (Picture: Lidl)

    Lidl has relaunched its giant £4 box of chicken nuggets, after people went crazy for them when they were first released in April for just a week, as a limited edition item.

    The nuggets then returned in May, and now, they’re back again.

    The XXL box features 800g of breaded chicken nuggets. Amazing, we know.

    Especially considering other supermarkets are selling pack half the size for more money – such as Asda, who sell a 250g packet for £1.99.

    Lidl's Giant ?4 Boxes Of Chicken Nuggets Are Back And Yum Lidl
    (Picture: Lidl)

    Tesco is also currently selling a 279g box of nuggets for £1 instead of £2.

    While Lidl’s deal is great, if you’re on a diet, you won’t want to eat the entire box at once, as one 115g serving has 265 calories.

    But come on – who’s really counting calories when you’re digging into chicken nuggets?

    Lidl's Giant ?4 Boxes Of Chicken Nuggets Are Back And Yum Lidl
    (Picture: Lidl)

    If you want to get your hands on a packet, you’ll also have to be super quick, as they’re part of the store’s ‘Pick of the Week’ offering, so the nuggets will only be available in stores for a limited time – from today until 8 August.

    So, if you’re planning on feasting on copious amounts of chicken nuggets, head down to your local Lidl ASAP.

    Otherwise, you’ll have to stick to your 20 Chicken McNuggets from McDonald’s – which isn’t a bad thing, really.

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    MORE: Lidl is now selling 5kg boxes of wonky fruit and veg for just £1.50


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    (Picture: Nando’s)

    Attention, students: Nando’s is going to be giving you free chicken to make opening your exam results a little bit easier.

    Well, it’s not really going to make opening them any easier really but hey – at least you’ll have some free chicken.

    Nando’s is giving away a couple of its menu items to every A-Level and Scottish Higher Student set to open their exam results.

    The special offer will be available in all Nando’s across the UK to any A-Levels and Highers Students who are receiving their results on 7 August in Scotland and 16 August in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    (Picture: Nando’s)

    Any A-level student going into the chicken restaurant on this date will get a free 1/4 chicken, a Firestarter, halloumi sticks or the classic Nando’s wings.

    The offer only runs until 17 August 2018, and is available to BTEC students, too.

    Just make sure you bring ID and your results along to the restaurant with you.

    But there is a catch (because isn’t there always?). The chicken isn’t actually totally free. We’re sorry.

    You have to make a minimum spend of £7 to get the free chicken.

    But really, that’s just like paying for a side and a drink – so at the end of it you’ll have an entire meal for £7.

    Or you could just take a friend and make them pay for their meal while you enjoy a free treat. No judgement.

    MORE: Doggy hot meal kits are going to be a thing

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    Quarter Chicken-fa93Quarter Chicken-fa93hattiegladwellmetroQuarter Chicken-fa93Quarter Chicken-fa93hattiegladwellmetro

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    Calling All Maids Of Honour, Horrible Hens Is The New Cards Against Humanity
    (Picture: Etsy)

    Got a hen do coming up? Then you should definitely take along this Cards Against Humanity inspired game, Horrible Hens.

    The pink and white game is just like the original black and white one – it features a bunch of question cards and even more answer cards, filled with funny, awkward and uncomfortable answers.

    All you have to do is select an answer to fill the blank on the question card, and everyone playing gets to take turns judging the best answer – which means the answer that makes people laugh the most.

    Etsy
    (Picture: Etsy)

    The game includes 280 answer cards and 80 question cards.

    All of the questions are wedding themed. One reads: ‘What’s going to make the bride late to the ceremony?’ and you get to pick from answers such as ‘really big dildos’, ‘old strippers’ or ‘performance anxiety’.

    To make the game more interesting – and you are on a hen do, remember – you could turn it into a drinking game, with the person with the funniest answer taking a shot each round.

    Etsy
    (Picture: Etsy)

    You’ll probably want to make sure the same person doesn’t win every single time – otherwise it won’t end well.

    The game is being sold on Etsy by NSFWPrintables, and is printable so you don’t even have to wait for it to come in the post – though you will have to pay £7.60 for it.

    So far, the game has received plenty of 5* reviews from impressed bridal parties.

    Etsy
    (Picture: Etsy)

    One person wrote: ‘What a brilliant game! This is going to be so fun’.

    Another said: ‘This will be perfect for my friend’s hen’s night – thank you so much! Printed nicely onto card.’

    Of course, no hen party is complete without a night on the town, shots and carrying around blown up sex dolls – but a game of Horrible Hens is the perfect way to start it all off.

    MORE: Couple have elegant Jurassic Park themed wedding

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    Calling All Maids Of Honour, Horrible Hens Is The New Cards Against HumanityCalling All Maids Of Honour, Horrible Hens Is The New Cards Against HumanityhattiegladwellmetroCalling All Maids Of Honour, Horrible Hens Is The New Cards Against HumanityEtsyEtsyEtsyCalling All Maids Of Honour, Horrible Hens Is The New Cards Against HumanityCalling All Maids Of Honour, Horrible Hens Is The New Cards Against HumanityhattiegladwellmetroCalling All Maids Of Honour, Horrible Hens Is The New Cards Against HumanityEtsyEtsyEtsy

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    Marks & Spencer has launched a diverse range of 'nude' stilettos picture: M&S
    (Picture: Marks & Spencer)

    Last year, Christian Louboutin made headlines by answering our prayers and launching a collection of nude heels to suit all skin tones.

    Each shoe in the diverse collection was made available in seven signature shades of nude – from porcelain to a deep brown.

    Last June, the designer took to his Instagram to announce the collection, sharing a photo of seven models wearing each shade of the shoe.

    He wrote: ‘Pep rally! Christian Louboutin extends his groundbreaking Nudes collection with the introduction of two new summer-ready styles, each available in a full spectrum of seven shades of nude.’

    Instagram Photo

    Of course, the only downside to the collection is that not everybody can afford it – with Louboutins costing hundreds.

    Which is why we’re super excited to see Marks and Spencer has followed in their footsteps at a fraction of the price.

    The more affordable high street store has just added a bit of diversity to its nude heel collection.

    Yep, you can now buy M&S stilettos in a range of different skin tones.

    (Picture: Marks & Spencer)

    Shades include dark taupe, espresso, mocha, light caramel, taupe and light pink.

    Oh, and as mentioned above – they’re all really affordable.

    At £19.50 per pair, you can’t really go wrong.

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    Marks & Spencer has launched a diverse range of 'nude' stilettosMarks & Spencer has launched a diverse range of 'nude' stilettoshattiegladwellmetroMarks & Spencer has launched a diverse range of 'nude' stilettosMarks & Spencer has launched a diverse range of 'nude' stilettoshattiegladwellmetro

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    (Picture: @marathonsforthemind)

    The Tour de France is tough on a bike, but it’s even tougher on foot.

    This year, elite cyclists rode 3,351 kilometres (2,082 miles) across France (and a tiny bit of Spain), with 26 mountain or hill climbs.

    It’s one of the world’s most watched sporting events, and requires both serious skill and stamina.

    It’s a punishing course to peddle through, but one brave man from Bournemouth has run the entire route.

    Peter Thompson spent 68 days running the Tour de France trail, and even finished two days before he planned to, all to raise money for the mental health charities Liveability and Mind.

    He’s the first Brit and the second person in the world ever to have run the whole Tour de France route.

    Every day, Peter would be up at 6am to run 30 miles, only stopping for small food or water breaks.

    Over the course of the 68 days, he covered 45,000 metres of vertical elevation across 3,329 kilometres – the equivalent of climbing Mount Everest three times over.

    At the end of the day, he would ice his feet and legs, chow down a massive 6,000 calories, and fall asleep in hotels, friends’ guest rooms, mobile homes and campsites along the trail.

    We caught up with Peter to ask how he completed this monster course in the blazing heat.

    This man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of schedule
    (Picture: @marathonsforthemind)

    First of all, what possessed you to attempt this challenge?

    Well, I did a challenge last year, where I ran 44 marathons in 44 countries in 44 days – one in every country in Europe – and that was to raise money for mental health charities.

    I just wanted to do something else really, to raise money and also to take on another adventure.

    I’m probably only the second person in the world stupid enough to try it!

    Did you need to be in peak physical condition?

    You definitely have to be fit to complete these challenges, but there’s a huge mental aspect too. It’s a combination of both.

    You could be the fittest person in the world but if you didn’t have the motivation to want to do it, I don’t think you’d get very far.

    My motivation was that I wanted to raise money for my mental health charities and raise awareness about mental health. The conversation has only really got going over the last few years, and it’s so important to keep people talking.

    The challenge and adventure aspect of trying to do something you don’t know if you can do is important too.

    Do you have personal experience of mental health problems?

    I don’t have personal experience myself with mental health issues, but I have quite a few friends and family members who struggle with serious mental health problems. I’ve seen how much of an impact it has on their lives and how often they don’t get the support they really need.

    I work with a lot of people with mental health problems through a social prescription service, where we connect isolated people with activities.

    We get referrals from doctors if they feel that people might be able to benefit from something social, and we’re receiving an increasing number of clients with mental health difficulties. It’s all about trying to connect them to activities that are going to be supportive and helpful to them.

    One of the charities I support is a garden project, where people can go one day a week to be part of a community and use it as a stepping stone back into other things.

    This man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of schedule
    Peter was running at least 30 miles a day for 68 days. (Picture: @marathonsforthemind)

    What was it like to run such a punishing course?

    The running aspect was incredibly hard. We were averaging over 30 miles a day and I think we did over 45,000 metres of climbing by the end of the challenge.

    I had many moments along the way where I doubted if I could do it. My girlfriend was with me the whole time and we would have breaks every 10 kilometres. Sometimes on those breaks I’d sit in the car trying to motivate myself to get going.

    We had problems trying to run on the road – during the Tour de France they’ll close all the road – lots of the time I was having to step off and run in the verges to avoid oncoming traffic.

    We were also battling the heat. It was upwards of 35 degrees some days and the last four or five last weeks of the challenge. I know it’s been hot in England, but it’s been even hotter in France, particularly around the Pyrenees where it’s closer to Spain.

    The biggest thing for me was to break it down. We broke the route down into 10 kilometre chunks and in my head, I’d just be getting to the end of the next 10 km. If you stand at the start line and think of the distance you have to run it seems impossible, so it’s all about breaking it down and making the route more manageable.

    Your girlfriend was with you throughout the course. Did that help?

    It’s hard to overstate what a difference it makes to have the support of your partner there constantly. There’s the emotional side obviously, but the practical one is just as important. If I’d been on my own, I wouldn’t have been able to carry the amount of water I needed.

    In the heat, I was drinking about six litres of water a day. I couldn’t have carried that on my back.

    We had about 15 or 20 friends from England who ran with me over various parts of the course, and we met lots of wonderful people out there. I met cyclists doing the course climbs and the support really has been amazing. The fundraising total is incredible.

    Do you think other people will want to attempt the course now you’ve completed it?

    I don’t see there being a mad rush of people wanting to do the Tour de France route or anything!

    There are always people looking to push themselves in different ways, whether it’s doing that or something similar, people do some weird and wonderful things.

    This man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of schedule
    Peter is only the second person in the world ever to run the whole Tour de France route. (Picture: @marathonsforthemind)

    I know you’ve just done an incredibly grueling 68-day run, but do you have any other challenges in mind?

    I don’t have any plans for a new challenge as of yet. At the moment, I just want to enjoy what we’ve done and not get distracted by wanting to jump on to something else.

    When you go on these adventures, you meet so many good people and see so many nice things and get to support causes you care about – that combination is hard not to consider for the future.

    But we’ll see!

    How did it feel to cross the finish line?

    It was a really special feeling when I completed the course. It was a mixture of excitement and pride, and there was definitely a bit of relief thrown in there!

    It wasn’t just the 68 days it took – we’d planned this for six months and there were so many people behind the scenes planning the routes. When that all comes together, it’s hard to describe but it’s a great feeling.

    In the past, I always wondered about the ‘what if’ in terms of taking risks. I always said that the biggest part of this challenge would be me getting to the starting line, not the finish line, and I’d still stand by that.

    I think putting yourself in a position for something to go wrong is sometimes the hardest thing to do.

    You can follow Peter’s journey on his website, Twitter and Instagram.

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    tour de france-e2a8tour de france-e2a8hpwilliamsonThis man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of scheduleThis man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of scheduleThis man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of scheduletour de france-e2a8tour de france-e2a8hpwilliamsonThis man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of scheduleThis man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of scheduleThis man ran the whole Tour de France route - and finished three days ahead of schedule

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    Mark and his family (Photo: Adrian Sherratt).

    My name is Mark Lemon. I am a children’s author, husband to Simone, and proud father of two beautiful children, Otis, seven, and Thea, three.

    At the age of 12, my father was murdered and my world changed forever.

    During the beginning of this year, I made the important decision to publish my fifth children’s book, The Magical Wood, which I wrote to help bereaved children.

    The impact of trauma at an early age has instilled in me a passion to help children struggling to cope with their own grief and mental health.

    At 3.10PM on Tuesday 12 May, 1992, I arrived home from school to be greeted by police cars and the sound of my sister crying in the living room.

    My mother took me upstairs and told me my father had died that morning. I remember holding her more tightly than I ever had before – or have done since.

    In 1992, our family had a cleaner who was going through a divorce and my mum and father were helping her through it.

    Since becoming a dad, I have always known that the time will come when I will have to sit down with my children to tell them what happened to Grandpa.

    The husband would check her post to find anything that pointed to his wife having an affair. Due to this, she had her post sent to our house instead, so my father could pass it on to her.

    On 12 May, the husband followed his wife to the house where my father delivered the post. He turned up to find my father’s car in the driveway.

    He went to a local supermarket where he stole a knife, then returned to the house where my father and the woman were drinking coffee in the kitchen.

    After a brief fight, the husband pulled out the knife and stabbed my father twice, killing him instantly and then turning on his wife. The wife managed to get out of the house and the man grabbed another knife and continued to stab my father.

    The husband was later caught and sentenced to four years in prison.

    Since becoming a dad, I have always known that the time will come when I will have to sit down with my children to tell them what happened to Grandpa. And recently Otis and Thea have started asking questions about where Grandpa is and why he isn’t alive any more.

    I guess it is about dealing with it in stages throughout their lives. The Magical Wood has helped us to remember Dad and talk about his death with the children.

    My hope is that by having these conversations during their early years, we can give them a platform to be able to openly share their feelings.

    It’s estimated that 45,000 children are bereaved every year, with more than 100 children bereaved every day. The impact of trauma at an early age can stay with a child for the rest of their lives.

    The Magical Wood was written to help open up the difficult conversation around grief. I wanted to write a book that would’ve helped me after my dad was killed.

    I wish I had opened up earlier when I was a child. By simply talking about their feelings children can start to share and express themselves openly, hopefully helping them with their mental health in the years to come.

    I truly believe it’s important that all children learn from an early age that death is a natural part of life. The earlier we start to introduce the conversation around death and grief in our schools, the earlier we can break the taboo in the UK.

    There are now lots of fantastic charities available to children such as Winston’s Wish, Cruse, Child Bereavement UK and Grief Encounter.

    These wonderful charities understand the impact of bereavement at a young age and have developed a range of practical support and guidance for children, their families and professionals.

    They offer specialist support programmes for children affected by deaths related to murder, manslaughter, suicide or the military community.

    I want all children struggling with grief to know that, although you will always miss that special person, you can go on to live a positive life after the death of a loved one.

    You can find out more about Mark and Lemon Drop Books here.

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    MORE: Pensioner, 70, takes framed photo of his late wife to look at the view every day


    Mark Lemon-0d87Mark Lemon-0d87jessrubyaustinMark Lemon-0d87Mark Lemon-0d87jessrubyaustin

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    AN untouched Scottish island whose only nod to the 21st Century is a "Vodafone signal in some parts" is one sale for just ?120,000. And possible buyers of Eilean Nan Gabhar, the Island of the Goats, can forget the convenience of open Sunday afternoon viewings. Prospective purchasers have been warned they must organise their own transport to the island "at their own risk". The island, about 30 miles south of Oban on Scotland's rugged and dramatically beautiful west coast, is the size of about nine football pitches. The island features a secluded bay where boats can be safely anchored, a pebbly beach, abundant flora, ancient woodland and fishing. But the island is otherwise completely without modern services such as water and electricity, and has no buildings. The island, 440m long and 180m wide, has belonged to the same family for over 70 years. Sellers Galbraith describe the sanctuary as a ?superb example of natural island beauty at its best?.
    (Picture: Deadline News)

    If you’ve got a spare £120,000 (please lend me some, I have spent all my money on trendy plants and furniture) and fancy investing in a place to live, you might want to skip the house deposit and look further afield.

    An untouched Scottish island is now on sale for exactly that price.

    That’s right, an entire island. That beats paying years of rent on a tiny studio, right?

    Eilean Nan Gabhar, also known as the Island of the Goats, is perfect for anyone wanting to do a digital detox and avoid ever bumping into Tinder dates gone wrong.

    There’s no water or electricity, and only Vodafone signal in ‘some parts’. There are no buildings, no busy roads, just a pebbly beach, lush vegetation and grassland, and all manner of flora and fauna.

    The island, which is 440m long and 180m wide, has belonged to the same family for over 70 years, but is now on sale for the bargain price of £120,000.

    Sellers Galbraith describe it as a ‘super example of natural island beauty at its best’.

    AN untouched Scottish island whose only nod to the 21st Century is a "Vodafone signal in some parts" is one sale for just ?120,000. And possible buyers of Eilean Nan Gabhar, the Island of the Goats, can forget the convenience of open Sunday afternoon viewings. Prospective purchasers have been warned they must organise their own transport to the island "at their own risk". The island, about 30 miles south of Oban on Scotland's rugged and dramatically beautiful west coast, is the size of about nine football pitches. The island features a secluded bay where boats can be safely anchored, a pebbly beach, abundant flora, ancient woodland and fishing. But the island is otherwise completely without modern services such as water and electricity, and has no buildings. The island, 440m long and 180m wide, has belonged to the same family for over 70 years. Sellers Galbraith describe the sanctuary as a ?superb example of natural island beauty at its best?.
    (Picture: Deadline News)

    ‘The ground is covered with a mix of lush vegetation, grassland, gorse and impressive rock formations,’ reads the brochure. ‘A lower area of land situated about a third of the way in from the west provides a natural link between the island’s north and south coasts and includes a rough path accessible by foot.

    ‘Both parts appear to mirror each other, rising up to their highest points and surrounded by numerous species of trees and wild flowers including rowan, willow, beech, bog myrtle, hawthorn, wild garlic and honeysuckle.

    ‘The island offers a stunning landscape to explore and from which to watch the wildlife it attracts. Fishing is also possible from its coast and numerous bays.’

    Sounds dreamy, right?

    It’s the ideal spot if you like relaxing sans technology and just taking in the sights. On the western half of the island there’s deep woodland where you can spot views of Craignish and the Island of Rum.

    There’s a bay where you can hang out with otters and sea birds, or you can take out your kayak and shore up at the pebbly beach.

    If you are in desperate need of going shopping, you can always travel to Lochgilphead or to Glasgow, which takes around two hours.

    Prospective buyers who are keen to visit the island first are warned that they must do so with their own transport and at their own risk, because, as we mentioned, there are no services on the island.

    If you’re up for taking a look, you can organise a viewing through Galbraith. Just make sure to invite us for the housewarming party.

    MORE: What I Rent: Paul and Mike, £1,350 for a flat in Tooting

    MORE: People share their experiences of living with dyspraxia

    MORE: Nando’s will give out free chicken or halloumi to A-level students on results day


    SEI_24018297-e207SEI_24018297-e207ellencscottAN untouched Scottish island whose only nod to the 21st Century is a SEI_24018297-e207SEI_24018297-e207ellencscottAN untouched Scottish island whose only nod to the 21st Century is a "Vodafone signal in some parts" is one sale for just ?120,000. And possible buyers of Eilean Nan Gabhar, the Island of the Goats, can forget the convenience of open Sunday afternoon viewings. Prospective purchasers have been warned they must organise their own transport to the island "at their own risk". The island, about 30 miles south of Oban on Scotland's rugged and dramatically beautiful west coast, is the size of about nine football pitches. The island features a secluded bay where boats can be safely anchored, a pebbly beach, abundant flora, ancient woodland and fishing. But the island is otherwise completely without modern services such as water and electricity, and has no buildings. The island, 440m long and 180m wide, has belonged to the same family for over 70 years. Sellers Galbraith describe the sanctuary as a ?superb example of natural island beauty at its best?.AN untouched Scottish island whose only nod to the 21st Century is a "Vodafone signal in some parts" is one sale for just ?120,000. And possible buyers of Eilean Nan Gabhar, the Island of the Goats, can forget the convenience of open Sunday afternoon viewings. Prospective purchasers have been warned they must organise their own transport to the island "at their own risk". The island, about 30 miles south of Oban on Scotland's rugged and dramatically beautiful west coast, is the size of about nine football pitches. The island features a secluded bay where boats can be safely anchored, a pebbly beach, abundant flora, ancient woodland and fishing. But the island is otherwise completely without modern services such as water and electricity, and has no buildings. The island, 440m long and 180m wide, has belonged to the same family for over 70 years. Sellers Galbraith describe the sanctuary as a ?superb example of natural island beauty at its best?.

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    Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, Italy
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

    Libraries are sacred places.

    When you venture outside your home, stop scrolling through Twitter, and walk through the doors of a library something magical happens.

    It’s so quiet, so peaceful. You can smell the pages of old books. You nestle into a cosy seat, pick a book that takes your fancy, and forget about everything going on outside those walls.

    A library is the ultimate escape – from the noise and bustle of the outside world, into a place of peace and quiet, into wherever your book takes you.

    Oh, and so many of them are absolutely stunning.

    As they should be, when we’re talking about places that honour knowledge, art, and creative thought.

    To pay tribute to the magic of libraries, Italian photographer Massimo Listri has travelled around the world capturing the beautiful pieces where books spend their time.

    The resulting book, Temples of Knowledge, is published by Taschen and is now available to order.

    Take a peek at some of the most awe-inspiring libraries inside those pages.

    Real Gabinete Português de Leitura, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Real Gabinete Portugu?s de Leitura, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

     

    Biblioteca Joanina, Coimbria, Portugal

    Biblioteca Joanina, Coimbria, Portugal
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

     

    Trinity College Library, Dublin, Ireland

    Trinity College Library, Dublin, Ireland
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

     

    Biblioteca do Convento de Mafra, Mafra, Portugal

    Biblioteca do Convento de Mafra, Mafra, Portugal
    (Picture@ Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

     

    Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, Paris, France

    Biblioth?que Sainte-Genevi?ve, Paris, France
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

     

    Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, Italy

    Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, Italy
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

    Stiftsbibliothek Sankt Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland

    Stiftsbibliothek Sankt Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

     

    Stiftsbibliothek Admont, Admont, Austria

    Stiftsbibliothek Admont, Admont, Austria
    (Picture: Massimo Listri/TASCHEN)

    MORE: Beautiful photo series shows women breastfeeding around the world

    MORE: What I Rent: Paul and Mike, £1,350 for a flat in Tooting


    The world's most beautiful librariesThe world's most beautiful librariesellencscottBiblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, ItalyReal Gabinete Portugu?s de Leitura, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBiblioteca Joanina, Coimbria, PortugalTrinity College Library, Dublin, IrelandBiblioteca do Convento de Mafra, Mafra, PortugalBiblioth?que Sainte-Genevi?ve, Paris, FranceBiblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, ItalyStiftsbibliothek Sankt Gallen, St. Gallen, SwitzerlandStiftsbibliothek Admont, Admont, AustriaThe world's most beautiful librariesThe world's most beautiful librariesellencscottBiblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, ItalyReal Gabinete Portugu?s de Leitura, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBiblioteca Joanina, Coimbria, PortugalTrinity College Library, Dublin, IrelandBiblioteca do Convento de Mafra, Mafra, PortugalBiblioth?que Sainte-Genevi?ve, Paris, FranceBiblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, ItalyStiftsbibliothek Sankt Gallen, St. Gallen, SwitzerlandStiftsbibliothek Admont, Admont, Austria

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    (Picture: Ashevill Humane Society)

    On this fine summer’s day, let us all take a moment to send our love and appreciation to Miss Butterworth, the corgi-chihuahua mix who healthily lost 10lb and found a loving home.

    Miss Butterworth arrived at the Asheville Humane Society severely overweight after her owner has passed away.

    Weighing in at 20lb, Miss Butterworth was classed as morbidly obese, at double the size of what a healthy dog of her breed should be.

    Thankfully the shelter was able to find a foster couple with plenty of experience looking after dogs, Sharon and Barry.

    Sharon and Barry put Miss Butterworth on a slow, steady plan to get healthy, taking her out for gentle walks and to swim in the lake and limiting the amount of food she was given.

    Picture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068
    (Picture: Asheville Humane Society)

    Over the course of a few months, the weight started to slip away and Miss Butterworth was able to become more active. She was more comfortable, too; able to run and play without her weight holding her down.

    She lost 10lb – half of her starting weight – and looked like an entirely different dog.

    Picture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068
    (Picture: Asheville Humane Society)

    Miss Butterworth’s journey was shared online, which attracted a load of fans keen to give her a forever home.

    At a healthy weight, she was almost ready to be adopted out, but the process was put on pause when a small cancerous mass was found on her leg.

    Thankfully surgery to remove the tumour was successful, the cancer hadn’t spread, and Miss Butterworth was soon in brilliant health.

    Once she had the all clear she headed to her new home with Paula and Daryl Fox.

    Picture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068
    (Picture: Asheville Humane Society)

    The Dodo reports that Paula and Daryl were overjoyed to be chosen as Miss Butterworth’s owners, as they had lost one of their dogs a few years back.

    They’d been following the corgi-chihuahua mix throughout her weight loss and fell in love.

    The pooch is now healthy and happy in a loving home. She spends her days playing, going on walks, and enjoying activity for the first time in years.

    Great work, Miss Butterworth.

    MORE: Doggy hot meal kits are going to be a thing

    MORE: Morbidly obese cat Bronson is on a strict diet to reach a healthy weight

    MORE: We’ve fallen in love with an adorable miniature horse who’s only 29 inches tall


    miss butterworth-cadcmiss butterworth-cadcellencscottPicture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068Picture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068Picture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068miss butterworth-cadcmiss butterworth-cadcellencscottPicture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068Picture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068Picture: Asheville Humane Society chihuahua weight loss https://www.facebook.com/pg/AshevilleHumane/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10156004010412068

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    (Picture: Simtee Few)

    In 2015, I was bitten by a tick while at a BBQ in north London.

    The next day I started getting flu like symptoms: stiff neck, sweats and fatigue, and I also felt extremely anxious.

    I turned to Google and researched ‘tick bite’ – straight away, Lyme disease came up.

    I had never heard of Lyme disease before. I immediately went to my GP and suggested she test me for it, to which she agreed and performed the standard test.

    The results came back negative, which I now know is because the pathogens of a tick take up to six weeks to show up in the blood.

    I trusted the doctor and assumed I didn’t have Lyme disease, so I put my symptoms down to postnatal depression. Despite feeling unwell, I tried to stay positive and pushed myself to keep working and looking after my kids.

    I had previously been a very active person, doing boot camps and running, so I tried to adapt to the weird symptoms believing they would pass; in fact, they just got worse.

    I had a headache that wouldn’t go away and then I started getting numbness and tingling sensations in my arms and legs in the middle of the night, like I was about to have a stroke.

    I started getting extreme panic attacks in my sleep – it felt like I was dying. There were a few times when I really did think I was going to die, and even wrote lists for my kids.

    I was in and out of hospital but every time I was sent home with antidepressants and told to get in touch with mental health services.

    Deep down I knew something wasn’t right, and then one day, I realised I couldn’t remember how to start the car.

    (Picture: Simtee Few)

    Because I had already had a negative test for Lyme disease on the NHS I was refused another, so I went to a private clinic and samples of my blood were sent off to America and Germany.

    Nearly a year after I was bitten, the test came back highly positive for what had now become chronic Lyme disease.

    I was actually relieved. I finally knew what was causing my debilitating symptoms.

    I took my results to my GP but I was refused treatment because my tests had been done abroad and were not recognised in the UK.

    Lyme disease is caused by borrelia burgdorferi sprirochete, a spiral shaped bacteria that digs its way into your skin tissue like a corkscrew.

    It causes inflammation of the brain and can affect everything from your memory and perception to your emotions and overall functioning.

    If treated early enough, a course of antibiotics is enough to cure Lyme disease but if it’s chronic, it starts to affect the vital organs in your body.

    I immediately started treatment in a private clinic in the UK but saw no improvement.

    Lack of awareness among healthcare professionals, and the public, means that a lot of people are being misdiagnosed and end up suffering for years.

    I started doing some research and came across a clinic in Germany that treats the disease with fat stem cells and blood stem cells.

    We’ve had to re-mortgage our house, use up all our savings and rely on fundraising to be able to afford all the treatments I’ve had both privately here and in Germany.

    According to Public Health England, 2,000-3,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported each year and statistics from the World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that in Europe, there have been 360,000 reported cases of the disease over the last 20 years.

    I felt abandoned by the NHS. I don’t believe that blood tests for Lyme disease in the UK are always accurate, which results in people receiving false negative and false positives.

    It is difficult to both diagnose and treat, and lack of awareness among healthcare professionals, and the public, means that a lot of people are being misdiagnosed and end up suffering for years.

    There is also a misconception that you can only catch Lyme disease in rural areas but this is not the case.

    There have been reported cases of people catching Lyme disease in Richmond Park and ticks are found all over the world, including throughout Europe.

    It’s time for the NHS to take action and give more funding to effective and efficient testing and treatments for Lyme sufferers.

    The majority of GPs in the UK have not had recent training on how to recognise the early signs of Lyme disease.

    We must train GPs to recognise the symptoms quickly – even if people don’t have the tell-tale ‘bulls-eye rash’, as only around one-third of people present with it.

    The truth is that there is no cure for chronic Lyme disease, it only goes into remission.

    I still battle with a lot of symptoms on a daily basis, such as fatigue, severe chest pains, vision problems, migraines and leaky gut syndrome to name just a few.

    According to some doctors, chronic Lyme disease doesn’t even exist. Yet here I am, and there are so many others being denied proper treatments sick, suffering in silence.

    MORE: Where in the world are you most likely to get skin cancer?

    MORE: 25 resuscitations, 48 hospital visits and countless lost moments made me realise I needed to manage my asthma properly

    MORE: As a new mum I mourned my inability to breastfeed


    IMG_2144-f6c8IMG_2144-f6c8rmve86IMG_2144-f6c8IMG_2144-f6c8rmve86

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    Clothing detail at the Prada show during Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 on June 17, 2018 in Milan, Italy.
    (Picture: Getty Images)

    The short short is coming back. We’re sorry/you’re welcome.

    With the summer heatwave continuing, and the male physique coming under more and more scrutiny (for better or worse), those who have worked at their physique want to show it off.

    To be honest, anything that moves men on from those horrific knee-length chino shorts would be welcome.

    We’ve already been through the muscle-fit and skin-tight skinny crazes, where every muscle was outlined and now fashion is moving towards removing the layer of clothing all together.

    It’s around 25 years since the short short for men really was mainstream, which means the fashion influencers of today weren’t even born while Chris Waddle was missing a penalty in incredibly short shorts.

    With the resurgence of athleisure, the blurry line of what’s gymwear and what’s just casualwear has given us a clear guideline of where long ends and short begins:

    Caption: The return of short shorts for men rex
    We’ve had 20 years of longer shorts, and now we’re getting shorter (Picture: Rex)

    Male running shorts come in three main lengths: 7”, 5” and 3”. Mo Farah and the distance runners you’ll see running quicker and further than you can will most likely be in the 3” shorts. Your whole leg is out.

    We’re always used to seeing the 7” (just above knee) but 5” (halfway down the thigh) is becoming the norm for people in the London gyms I frequent. It’s starting to filter out on to the catwalks and into the street.

    ‘Shorter shorts feel new, especially in white,’ trend forecaster WGSN says.

    ‘Smarter and shorter shorts are important trends, but, as with trouser shapes, there is balance and choice – worth bearing in mind when it comes to planning new product trials.’

    This was seen on the catwalks with shows such as Prada, Katama and Fendi showing off a lot more leg than we’ve been used to over recent seasons. Feng Chen Wang went one further and put the models in hot pants.

    MILAN, ITALY - JUNE 17: A model walks the runway at the Prada show during Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 on June 17, 2018 in Milan, Italy. (Photo by Jacopo Raule/Getty Images)
    The Prada show during Milan Men’s Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 showed a lot of leg (Picture: Jacopo Raule/Getty Images)

    I don’t think the local pub is quite ready for that sight (yet) and I got shouted at by a group of teenagers for ‘going out in my boxer shorts’ when I was trialing shorter lengths.

    But it’s moving that way and the street is starting to take notice of the shorter short.

    ‘Due to the sizzling hot temperature, global fashion streets played host to the shortest of shorts,’ WGSN says.

    With the trend spilling out from the gym, men are going for either slim but toned legs or muscle-laden.

    This is much like the 70s and 80s trend but things have changed to a man’s advantage since then.

    Loose underwear is slowly making way for short trunks so the risk of acute wardrobe malfunctions are less likely if you make the correct preparations.

    That fear will never vanish completely but now we are at least managing the risk.

    Nobody wants the worst to happen.

    It’s unusual to think of footballer Cristiano Ronaldo as a style icon (he has made some questionable choices) but it seems like his unusual free kick ritual to shorten his shorts could really mean he’s on to something.

    Seeing Harry Kane in England short shorts now might seem ridiculous but it’s not beyond the realm of possibility for things to be heading that way by the next World Cup.

    And if it’s on ASOS already, it must be true, with 26 different ‘shorter shorts’ on offer for men.

    For the rest of this summer, it’ll be the fashionistas daring to wear shorter shorts.

    Next summer, it’ll probably be a lot more of us.

    MORE: Marks & Spencer launches nude heels in a range of skin tones

    MORE: Commitmentphobia: Why millennials don’t want to settle for one person


    Illustration/orig comp request: The return of short shorts for menIllustration/orig comp request: The return of short shorts for menalexhudsClothing detail at the Prada show during Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 on June 17, 2018 in Milan, Italy.Caption: The return of short shorts for men rexMILAN, ITALY - JUNE 17: A model walks the runway at the Prada show during Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 on June 17, 2018 in Milan, Italy. (Photo by Jacopo Raule/Getty Images)Illustration/orig comp request: The return of short shorts for menIllustration/orig comp request: The return of short shorts for menalexhudsClothing detail at the Prada show during Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 on June 17, 2018 in Milan, Italy.Caption: The return of short shorts for men rexMILAN, ITALY - JUNE 17: A model walks the runway at the Prada show during Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019 on June 17, 2018 in Milan, Italy. (Photo by Jacopo Raule/Getty Images)

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