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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    (Picture: Moncler)

    High fashion can be uppity – we don’t always get it.

    Sometimes, we really, really don’t get it.

    Italian apparel brand Moncler and British designer Craig Green are both well-known names in the world of fashion.

    Their collaboration, however, isn’t the biggest hit to grace the catwalk.

    The two brands have come together to launch a number of coats, vests, bags, and trousers for their new line, named Genius.

    However, the looks were anything but.

    Picture: Moncler We're not really sure what Craig Green's new fashion line is meant to be
    (Picture: Moncler)

    The Genius range comes in three different styles; pinstriped, black, and white.

    It’s packed with lightweight padded material, including matt nylon fabric and filled with cotton down.

    Obviously, you don’t want to look like a cold weather samurai without people knowing you’re wearing serious designer styles so don’t worry, the three-dimensional Moncler tag can’t be missed.

    A snazzy hood also covers most of your face, so at least people won’t spot you wearing the exaggerated outfit.

    People were left a little confused and naturally, they had a field day on social media about it.

    Most said the outfits looked more like a bedspread, an air mattress, and even the Michelin man (you know, the one with the rolls).

    In essence, people said it looked like a walking sleeping bag.

    Though Moncler’s collaboration with Craig is set to launch on 22 August, people haven’t warmed to the idea.

    But it’s not the first time the British designer has been mocked for his sartorial creations.

    When he presented his first collection as part of a Topman / Fashion East initiative, he was mocked by many for his unusual ‘plank’ hat, including model and London Collections: Men ambassador, David Gandy.

    Craig’s new designs are even bolder than the last and with designer prices, they may still be a hit once released.

    And on the bright side, you’ll always be comfy in this getup no matter what the weather.

    Prices have not been released yet but look out on the website for more details soon.

    MORE: How to wear the leopard print trend on a budget

    MORE: The next big trend is wearing your jacket as a top

    MORE: Vogue will no longer hire models under 18


    We're not really sure what Craig Green's new fashion line is meant to beWe're not really sure what Craig Green's new fashion line is meant to befaimabakar1Picture: Moncler We're not really sure what Craig Green's new fashion line is meant to beWe're not really sure what Craig Green's new fashion line is meant to beWe're not really sure what Craig Green's new fashion line is meant to befaimabakar1Picture: Moncler We're not really sure what Craig Green's new fashion line is meant to be

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    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)

    Artist Ben Heine has always made creative drawings.

    The 35-year-old from Brussels, Belgium, has made a name for himself creating 3D pencil sketches and now he has taken his style worldwide.

    The photographer has re-imagined parts of his own pictures by blending them with sketches to create some pretty cool new work.

    His most recent images feature commuters in a Hong Kong metro station and an angel looking down on St Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow.

    All the snapshots feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist, and the artwork.

    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)

    ‘When I have an idea coming, I like to start with a small and simple idea and make it more and more complex and powerful during the creative process,’ said Heine.

    ‘The idea and the message I try to convey are the most important parts of the artwork, so this is always challenging.’

    The concept, called Pencil Vs Camera, sees Ben travel the world and pick tourist locations which he snaps on his camera.

    He then uses pencils or charcoal sticks to make the illustration in-between the image.

    The sketches, done freehand in a single take, can take up to a week to complete.

    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)

    ‘I’m actually using a mix of charcoal sticks for the large shadows and thick dark lines and graphite pencils for the smallest details and soft shadows,’ he said.

    ‘Both materials are carbon-based so they still belong to the same medium.’

    He also wants to extend his work to a bigger platform.

    ‘I wanted to have my sketches large enough to pose with them and become part of the whole composition – to have my full body replacing the hand.’

    Here are a few more of his creations:

    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)
    Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.
    (Picture: Ben Heine / SWNS.com)

    We might be seeing more of our favourite travel locations in the artist’s work very soon.

    MORE: Stunning photos of colourful pigeons will make you see the birds in a new way

    MORE: Mum dresses her baby as powerful women through history

    MORE: How much is too much for a man to spend on grooming?


    Photographer re-imagines his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenesPhotographer re-imagines his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenesfaimabakar1Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Photographer re-imagines his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenesPhotographer re-imagines his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenesfaimabakar1Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.Pencil sketch mixed with a photo by Ben Heine, 35. See Masons copy MNPENCIL: A photographer has re-imagined his own pictures by blending them with pencil sketches to create imaginary scenes. Ben Heine, 35, brings real-life images to life by replacing parts of them with detailed drawings. The seemingly effortless snapshots all feature his own hand to represent the connection between the viewer, the artist and the artwork.

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    If someone mentions the US Capital Region, politics, monuments and museums normally spring to mind.

    But the new waterfront developments in the area – which span across Washington DC, Maryland, and Virginia – is hoping to transform the Capital Region into a destination for a younger, hipper crowd.

    As it stands, the areas have all been partly redeveloped, with new accommodation, restaurants, water taxi services and water-based activities.

    So while you can still visit all the usual tourist spots during the day, there’s also a vibrant nightlife to enjoy.

    I’m always interested in checking out potentially cool locations so I flew into the bankside cities to see if the improvements were really as good as they sounded.

    The Capital Wheel in National Harbor (Picture: National Harbor)

    The National Harbor development in Maryland was my first stop and it did not disappoint.

    It’s great for families and couples, with plenty to do during the day and at night, but it’s worth venturing out to nearby Oxon Hill Manor and National Colonial Farm, too.

    Oxon Hill Manor, a neo-Georgian mansion, has a special place in the history of the area – it reportedly hosted Franklin D Roosevelt and Sir Winston Churchill.

    In contrast, National Colonial Farm, which takes up around 200 hundred acres of Piscataway National Park, is a living farm museum.

    It’s populated with all the animals you’d expect to see on a normal farm, but the twist is, some of the workers dress like they did around the time of the American Revolution to show visitors what life was life then.

    Gaylord Hotel in National Harbor (Picture: National Harbor)

    The Capital Wheel is not to be missed.

    Situated on the National Harbour pier, and measuring 180 feet (54.9 m) tall, it’s basically the London Eye but much quicker.

    National Harbour comes alive in the evenings.

    At the family-friendly Gaylord Hotel, you can dine, enjoy the pool or just take in the impressive views of Waterfront Street.

    Or if you want to take a gamble, there’s a MGM casino on the strip. In the same building, there are also restaurants, rooftop bars, shops and a concert hall – you needn’t feel like you have to gamble.

    Where to eat in National Harbour:

    Bond 45: a New York-style Italian kitchen and bar with happy hour and weekly live music.

    Rosa Mexicano: a Mexican restaurant with a big list of agave-based drinks.

    Ginger: an Asian restaurant offering Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese dishes.

    Old Town, Alexandria taken from the Wilson Bridge that crosses the Potomac River.
    Old Town Alexandria (Picture: Getty)

    For a more traditional waterfront experience, head to Alexandria in Virginia where the architecture dates back to the 18th and 19th century.

    I took the scenic route there – on a water taxi from National Harbour, which took around 30 minutes.

    There’s no shortage of things to do in Old Town Alexandria, which has 200 independent restaurants and boutiques, with many located on King Street.

    The Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum and a paper shop called Penny Post are definitely worth a visit.

    There’s also the Torpedo Factory Art Center, which is filled with cool artwork.  And yes, it did store torpedos back in the day.

    You will not want to leave Alexandria (Picture: Visit Alexandria)
    You will not want to leave Alexandria (Picture: Visit Alexandria)

    The waterfront in Alexandria is also being redeveloped and looks pretty sweet so far.

    Nearby, there’s Mount Vernon, the former home of George Washington. It’s just 30 minutes away in Fairfax County and well worth a visit – but be sure to budget at least a morning.

    Where to eat in Alexandria:

    The Majestic: serves gourmet comfort food.

    Virtue Feed & Grain: a modern American tavern that’s great for a late night snack.

    Hank’s Pasta Bar: Italian restaurant with gluten-free options.

    The waterfront is impressive (Picture: Washington D.C. tourist board)
    The waterfront is impressive (Picture: Washington D.C. tourist board)

    You could say I saved the best until last with Washington D.C. but that would not be fair on the other destinations, so we’ll just call it different.

    I stayed at the Intercontinental, which was right beside the waterfront and was a bit more hectic than National Harbour and Alexandria.

    The re-developed waterfront has just opened for its first summer season.

    There are lots of water-based activities, including canoeing and paddle boarding, which visitors can try. Check out Boating in DC for details of activities and prices.

    The monument to President Abraham Lincoln (Picture: Getty Images)

    Of course, you couldn’t visit DC and not see the monuments – at least on your first time.

    It’s easy to see landmarks like the Lincoln Memorial and Martin Luther King Jr Memorial on bikes – and it’s even better when it’s sunny.

    Bike and Roll do a good tour, and you have a guide explaining the history behind each of the monuments you stop at.

    In terms of the nightlife, most of the action takes place on U street and 14th Street.

    Whatever style of music you’re into – hip hop, RnB, house or jazz – there’s a spot to go to.

    They’re all close enough to walk – in fact, I went to a few places in a single now. Yes, there were sore heads the next day.

    Where to eat in Washington DC:

    Kith and Kin: a brilliant mix of food from Nigeria and Jamaica.

    Where to stay in the Capital Region and how to get there:

    Harborside Hotel is based at the National Harbor and prices start from $209 (£164.56) per night.

    The recently renovated Kimpton Lorien Hotel & Spa is on the edge of Old Town Alexandria. Prices start from $189 (£148.81) per night.

    Intercontinental Washington DC, The Wharf is an urban resort by the water and prices start from $350 (£275.57) per night.

    Virgin Atlantic flies daily from London Heathrow to Washington DC, with return fares from £595 per person.

    MORE: Food, rum and romance – Barbados has the perfect holiday for couples

    MORE: From Havana to Cayo Ensenachos: The city and beach break you can only find in Cuba

    MORE: Stunning scenery and rare golden monkeys: A Yangtze River cruise in China is one you will never forget


    National Harbour2National Harbour2jimmynsubugaukmetroOld Town, Alexandria taken from the Wilson Bridge that crosses the Potomac River.You will not want to leave Alexandria (Picture: Visit Alexandria)The waterfront is impressive (Picture: Washington D.C. tourist board)National Harbour2National Harbour2jimmynsubugaukmetroOld Town, Alexandria taken from the Wilson Bridge that crosses the Potomac River.You will not want to leave Alexandria (Picture: Visit Alexandria)The waterfront is impressive (Picture: Washington D.C. tourist board)

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    Rosalie Nelson
    Left was when Rosalie was told to lose more weight, right is Rosalie at a more healthy weight (Picture: Rob Crawford)

    The fashion industry has been praying on young girls and boys for years, and Vogue has decided that now is the time to step up their game.

    The magazine has recently agreed to not use models under the age of 18, as it gives a false impression of what an average woman would look like wearing the advertised clothes. And while this is a small step towards a healthier standard within the fashion industry, there is still a long way to go.

    Some modelling agencies have claimed to have taken a step in the right direction too – DNA Models and The Society Management, both based in New York, have stated they won’t submit new models under the age of 18 for Fashion Week. However, DNA Models will keep any models currently under 18, who have previously walked for Fashion Week, in that cycle.

    The practice of using underweight and underage models has been in the news for years now, and aside from the odd campaign of ‘diversity,’ there doesn’t seem to be much change actually happening within fashion. Big name designers and high street stores still use very thin and often very young models to showcase their latest season collections.

    After modelling in Australia for two years, I moved to London and met with some of the biggest agencies here. All of these agencies said I was either too fat at size 8, or too old at 21.

    One agency said they would take me on if I lost some weight – so I did. I lost around 10 kg (20 pounds) from my already thin 58kg body, and when I went back to see the agency, they said they wanted my bones to stick out more. That’s when I decided I would stand up for myself, and for every other model, and start my petition.

    Modelling is a tough industry to work in; there’s a lot of competition for jobs, a lot of jealousy among your peers and a lot of attention paid to every little detail about you as a person.

    I was once told by my agent that I should never talk to the client, I should never show my personality and I should never smile. I was only there to be a blank canvas to the designer and photographer. I was told to not be myself.

    Nearly every model I know has been harassed by a photographer, or felt uncomfortable at a job, or has been instructed to go on an extreme diet.

    To put that into perspective, imagine being 15-years-old, being told to be thinner and to never be yourself – all from your agent. Your agent is the person deciding how your life in fashion is going to be, and they’re the one telling you to keep your mouth shut and your body thin.

    This shouldn’t be a game of cat and mouse. We shouldn’t have to chase the fashion industry for the problems to be fixed.

    I have personally met with a certain head of fashion here in London who simply didn’t care about making a change, even if it would be saving young girls and boys lives. The people who hold the most power are often the ones who care the least.

    With my petition, I will hopefully be able to speak in Parliament again and have legislation brought in to help create a new standard for health and safety within fashion. The Model Alliance, based in New York, has been doing great work for models’ rights in the US but we need something in place here in the UK too.

    The idea of change is often scary, but in this case, I can only see it as being positive. The fashion industry is comparable to Pandora’s Box – all the evils have been unleashed, and called out, and now all that’s left is hope for change.

    MORE: Boohoo accused of Photoshopping the waist of a size 10 model

    MORE: Primark is receiving loads of praise for choosing a model who was born with one arm

    MORE: Model breastfeeds her daughter on the Sports Illustrated runway


    Vogue under 18 modelsVogue under 18 modelsqinxieRosalie NelsonVogue under 18 modelsVogue under 18 modelsqinxieRosalie Nelson

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    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    In this series, we’re looking at the importance of comprehensive sex and relationships education in schools, what happens when young people don’t receive it and why some people don’t want them to.

    After nearly two decades of waiting for a reform, the new guidelines for education on sex and relationships are here.

    The government plans to roll out a new curriculum that provides relationships education (RE) to primary school children, and relationships and sex education (RSE) to secondary school students by September 2020.

    The new curriculum will be required in all UK schools, however parents may still be able to withdraw their children from the sex education, and faith schools will be permitted to teach their own ‘distinctive faith perspective’ on relationships.

    This new curriculum, which was originally scheduled to be rolled out in September 2019, also covers lessons on cyberbullying, mental well-being and healthy lifestyles.

    Although the new guidelines are welcomed by education professionals and campaigners, some organisations fear that they go too far, and others are adamant that they aren’t bold enough.

    But what does it mean to receive good (or bad) sex education?

    What impact can it have on the rest of your life?

    Johnathan*, 60, is the father of three grown-up sons and works in publishing.

    This is what he remembers about sex and relationships education back in the 1970s and how it has shaped his relationships since then.

    Did you receive any sex education at school?

    All I can remember about the sex education at school was a rather glum biology teacher who was standing at the front of the class and going through the basics.

    She managed to convey that the man puts his erect penis inside the woman’s vagina.

    And I remember sitting there and thinking ‘but what happens next?’

    Only after a while did it become clear that he would move in and out – and that was about the extent of my sex education.

    Back in 1972, there were certainly no mentions of lesbian and gay sex, anal sex, oral sex, consent or pornography.

    Did you learn anything about protection against sexually transmitted diseases or pregnancy?

    I cant recall learning about contraception.

    It was all very much framed as ‘this is what you do when you’re going to have a baby’.

    Our sex education wasn’t delivered as ‘this is what you might need to know if you meet someone in the pub and decide you want to shag them’ – which of course might have been more useful for a room full of teenagers.

    For many years, because I hadn’t been taught anything about them, I thought that a condom was a kind of ring that you put round your penis so nothing could squeeze out.

    I remember someone once saying ‘there’s a condom in the playground’ and we all shot out to have a look at it, and I just thought: ‘that’s a condom?’

    It completely shattered what I’d thought a condom would look like.

    We knew we should use it to stop pregnancy, but I don’t remember me or any of my friends at school being aware that condoms would protect against STIs.

    looking in mirror
    ‘There was absolutely no discussion of transgender issues that I was aware of.’ (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    When did you first become aware that people can identify as LGBT?

    I didn’t have any awareness of LGBT relationships until college.

    People were away from family for the first time and people who’d known them all their lives, and it was easier to come out.

    I remember being quite shocked at the sight of men kissing, partly because we never had any education around it.

    No one told us that it was perfectly natural.

    I was involved in left-wing politics and there was certainly more awareness of gay rights, although I’m not sure that the left actually embraced this in the beginning.

    There was absolutely no discussion of transgender issues that I was aware of.

    When did you realise how important it is to protect yourself from STIs?

    There have certainly been occasions where I haven’t worn a condom when I should’ve done, but I really became aware of the need for safe sex during the time of the AIDS crisis in the ’80s.

    I would’ve been around 26.

    For the younger generation, it’s probably difficult to envisage how devastating it was when it first started.

    So many people were dying. It sent everyone into a complete panic.

    I do remember speaking recently to a gay man who was explaining to me that during this particular time, he wouldn’t have anal intercourse. He was so aware of the risks of AIDS, he just wouldn’t do it.

    There was a guy at my workplace who died of AIDS. He was bisexual.

    I remember seeing him and being shocked because he’d changed so dramatically overnight.

    What about the importance of consent?

    I cannot remember ever being told about consent or getting advice about it.

    That’s not to say that my generation were all running around being rapists or anything like that, but I think the idea of someone not consenting was quite alien.

    I don’t mean we expected everyone to shag us, but putting yourself in a position where you were having sex with someone who didn’t want to wasn’t something we really thought about.

    To someone my age, the idea that you can withdraw consent during sexual activity is quite strange.

    I think the culture around sex and relationships has changed dramatically in my lifetime.

    What are your thoughts on porn?

    In my opinion, the availability of pornography has expanded people’s sexual horizons in ways that might be good, but might also be bad.

    People are much more conscious of sex and sexuality than they were in the ’70s.

    By today’s standards, porn was incredibly mild when I was growing up.

    Top shelf magazines would show women with their breasts exposed, but there were no couples and no penetration.

    I remember going to Gatwick airport as a teenager with a group of friends, and one of us lifted a porn magazine from WH Smith’s.

    We all scuttled off and sat on the grass to look at it.

    Porn was sought-after in my childhood, but rarely found.

    What about when you were in your 20s?

    I can remember the first time I found ‘good’ porn. It was in a shop in Soho, and it was on VHS video.

    It cost me £20, which in those days was a lot of money, but you could exchange it for half price on your next tape.

    I kept thinking ‘this won’t be the real thing, I’ve been ripped off’ but I got it home, and it was.

    It made such an impact and I remember the first time I saw the woman going down on the guy, and it was mind-blowing.

    I went back and bought another tape, rather than exchanging the one I had, because I was worried that I’d get ripped off with next video.

    The nature of porn has definitely changed.

    There used to be more of an attempt to pretend that they were legitimate films with a plot and characters who just happened to have explicit sex.

    Now, it’s just scenes.

    I definitely think that I’d have a different relationship with sex if I’d been exposed to porn in the way that young people are today.

    So many things – like anal sex – are now considered standard.

    Back in the day, I never thought to expect my partner to do that.

    The worrying factor for young people growing up and watching porn is that they think what they see is normal and it’s real.

    Porn is an exaggeration of sex, it’s often portrayed as so casual – a woman being picked up off the street and then ending up in a gang bang – but that’s not real life.

    Were you concerned about your sons consuming pornography as young people?

    I know that my sons got sex education at school, but I don’t know what it consisted of – although I’m sure it was better and more comprehensive than mine.

    I never took steps to stop my sons watching pornography and I never discussed it with them either.

    I did worry about what they might be seeing, but I never checked their browsing histories (even though they were using a family PC in the study).

    Thinking about it now, I should’ve discussed porn with them and how it’s not like real life.

    My wife spoke to each of the boys about contraception when she was driving them to university, although we did know that one of them was already sexually active.

    I suppose we just trusted them to be sensible.

    Looking back now, I wish I’d been the one to have those conversations with them. I should’ve been better at talking to them about intimate issues.

    I think – to be perfectly blunt – I just bottled it when it came to talking to my kids about sex, and I really hope that hasn’t had a detrimental effect on their lives.

    My parents never mentioned sex to me.

    Do you believe that children should receive comprehensive sex and relationships education, and should parents have the right to stop their children accessing it?

    I have no dispute with compulsory sex and relationships education in school.

    I don’t think parents should be able to withdraw their children from sex education lessons, though. It’s an important part of the education process.

    Should parents be free to impose their religious views on their children? Some religions see that as absolutely mandatory, but I think it’s damaging to the child.

    I find it hard to support the idea that because your parents believe in this religion, you should be denied this crucial knowledge.

    Apart from anything else, it isolates the child at school.

    Children are very conscious of who the insiders and the outsiders are, and if you’re the child who hasn’t had the sex and relationships class, everyone will know and you might become the object of derision and bullying.

    What parent wants that for their child?

    Co-ed schools are incredibly important. I don’t agree with same sex schools.

    Children and young people must be able to navigate relationships with the opposite sex, not just in the academic sense but also in the playground and in social situations.

    If you deny a child that, you’re creating problems for the future.

    *Name has been changed

    MORE: Universities’ decision to outsource mental health services could be devastating for students

    MORE: http://Consent will be taught in sex education classes to children as young as four

    MORE: It is ridiculous that 95% of all sex education lessons still aren’t LGBT-inclusive


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    London, you’ve been beat (Picture: Getty)

    Two of the most successful football teams in the world, Oasis, Take That and Coronation Street – what do they all have in common?

    They’re some of the biggest names from Manchester, of course.

    And the northern town came out on top in a ranking of the most liveable cities in the world, beating London by a landslide 13 spots.

    The coveted first place in the Economist’s Global Liveability Index 2018 went to Vienna in Austria, with Melbourne and Osaka close behind.

    Noel Gallagher, one half of arguably the world’s most famous pair of brothers, hails from Manchester (Picture: Simone Joyner/Getty Images)

    The table ranked 140 cities on a range of factors such as safety, healthcare, educational resources, infrastructure and environment.

    Manchester Evening News reported that the city saw the largest jump, climbing 16 places to number 35.

    And to rub more salt in the wounds of Londoners, the capital was placed 48th – making it the widest gap between the two cities since the survey first began in the 1990s.

    The city’s indomitable spirit following the Manchester bombings has gathered support from the rest of the world (Picture: Kevin Mazur/One Love Manchester/Getty Images for One Love Manchester)

    Events following the Manchester bombings have also helped bring together not only Mancunians but also gathered worldwide support with people commended the city for its indomitable spirit.

    Top ten livable cities

    1 Vienna

    2 Melbourne

    3 Osaka

    4 Calgary

    5 Sydney

    6 Vancouver

    7 Toronto

    8 Tokyo

    9 Copenhagen

    10 Adelaide

    But while Manchester has climbed in the rankings, the index found that six of the top ten cities were in Australia and Canada, all of which have very low population densities.

    Cities with fewer people have the freedom and space to allow recreational activities without overburdened infrastructure and high crime rates, the magazine reported.

    Similarly, New York fared worse than Boston, which was ranked 15 spots higher than the Big Apple – arguably the most well-known city in America.

    Political and economic turmoil, as well as conflict are major factors that influenced ratings for the lowest scoring cities.

    In the bottom ten were Dakar, Algiers, Douala, Tripoli, Harare, Port Moresby, Karachi, Lagos, Dhaka, and Damascus.

    MORE: See another side of the US Capital Region: How to explore Washington DC, Maryland and Virginia through their waterfronts

    MORE: What I Rent: Rebecca, £714 a month for a room in a two bedroom flat in Tooting

    MORE: What I Rent: Sophie and India, £1,300 a month for a two bedroom flat in Peckham


    Manchester United Vendoe at Old TraffordManchester United Vendoe at Old Traffordfaimabakar1Manchester United Vendoe at Old TraffordManchester United Vendoe at Old Traffordfaimabakar1

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    (Picture: Subtle Simple)

    Are you in need of major fashion inspo?

    Are the latest bizarre sartorial trends leaving much to be desired?

    While the likes of Zara and Cos remain more popular than ever, it can all be a bit samey.

    Especially as Zara is so globally available – chances are you’re going to find someone who has the same top as you or an identical pair of palazzo pants.

    It’s unlikely that many of your friends have heard about the up-and-coming Vietnamese brand, Subtle Simple, so get an online haul sorted before the site blows up with orders.

    Picture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to Zara
    (Picture: Subtle Simple)
    Picture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to Zara
    (Picture: Subtle Simple)

    Subtle Simple ships worldwide and is having a moment with Instagram influencers singing the brand’s praises.

    Blogger Brittany Bathgate put it on the social media fashion map when she uploaded an image of a balloon-sleeved white cotton dress that went down a treat.

    Other fashionistas soon jumped on board the ultra-chic label.

    You’ll find Zara style classics among Subtle Simple’s statement silhouettes, blazers, and blouses, which are rendered in classic neutral and dark colours.

    Picture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to Zara
    (Picture: Subtle Simple)
    Picture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to Zara
    (Picture: Subtle Simple)
    Picture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to Zara
    (Picture: Subtle Simple)

    The brand seems to mostly offer clothing for women but does appear to have a few options available for men as shown on its Instagram page.

    Like Zara, the prices are a bit more budget-friendly than designer labels with the balloon-sleeved dress available for £116.80 ($149).

    Whether you opt for a pair of pleated trousers for the office or a linen gown for a special occasion, you’re bound to get people asking where you made your purchase.

    Happy shopping –  you can thank us when people compliment your wardrobe.

    You can buy the range here.

    MORE: I was told to lose weight by a modelling agency at size 8 – but even after shedding 10kg I was still considered ‘too fat’

    MORE: If you ever wanted to look like a sleeping bag, Moncler’s new fashion line has you covered

    MORE: How to wear the leopard print trend on a budget


    Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraVietnamese store is alternative to Zarafaimabakar1Picture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraVietnamese store is alternative to ZaraVietnamese store is alternative to Zarafaimabakar1Picture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to ZaraPicture: Subtle Simple Vietnamese store is alternative to Zara

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    (Picture: Getty)

    The period between getting into uni and starting classes is a pretty sweet one.

    But while it’s certainly an exciting time, it can be quite daunting too.

    You probably won’t get that much free time to yourself for a while, so make sure you use it to do some fun and productive things.

    If you’re moving away for university, it’s most likely going to be your first time living without the safety of mum and dad / your carers.

    There’s plenty to do to prepare.

    (Picture: Getty)

    There’s just over a month ’til the excitement of freshers begins.

    That’s enough time to get a temporary job and save up some money.

    University is becoming increasingly expensive and if you don’t want to take out too many loans, a short-term job could give you back-up funds.

    You can clock up the hours at a retail job or even do something related to the field you’re going into; work experience or a short apprenticeship could give you the skills you need to prosper in your degree.

    Plus, networking in your industry is always useful.

    (Picture: Getty)

    While the beginning of university is generally all about having fun, making new friends and partying, you will also be expected to work very hard.

    Most courses have a summer reading list and send out course reading material before you start your term.

    Get ahead, purchase all the necessary resources and read them.

    You probably won’t be able to get through it all but try to learn the required content.

    Moving out takes time and planning.

    You can move into university halls of residence, independent halls or private rented accommodation.

    Most university halls have a deadline and work on a first-come first-serve basis so book yours sooner rather than later.

    Applications are typically made online. You usually put down a number of preferences – your choice of accommodation residence, as well as the type of room you’d like (standard, en-suite, catered etc.).

    Some places are over-subscribed so you’re not guaranteed to get into your first choice.

    Once you know where you’re going, you should also start thinking about all the stuff you’ll need i.e bedding, bathroom and kitchen essentials and stationery.

    (Picture: Getty)

    In the few weeks before you start, you could learn a new skill like cooking, which will come in handy when you’ve moved out.

    It also means you don’t have to eat cereal for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

    And it might also help you avoid the ‘Freshman 15’ (weight put on during the first few weeks of uni when you’re not eating well and potentially drinking more).

    That’ll be you soon (Picture: Getty)

    Lastly, to reiterate the first point, you won’t get a month of total freedom for a while, so, make the most of it.

    See your friends and family, and make some memories before you dive into uni life.

    MORE: You don’t need a degree for these well-paid jobs

    MORE: How to make a long distance relationship work if you’re both going to different universities

    MORE: A-level results: What you can expect at Fresher’s Week


    Students walking outside universityStudents walking outside universityfaimabakar1Students walking outside universityStudents walking outside universityfaimabakar1

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    Assorted handmade milk and dark chocolate pralines in a row.
    (Picture: Getty)

    As a child, you were probably dreaming of the day you’d win a golden ticket to Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory.

    Well Wonka can keep his imaginary land of chocolate rivers and lickable wallpaper, because in a few months you can tour the Fantastical Chocolate Festival instead.

    The closest thing possible to a chocolate paradise, the festival will feature all that your sweet tooth desires: chocolate fountains, chocolate statues and chocolate fondue.

    The UK’s top confectioners will be there too, with stalls selling every kind of chocolate.

    (Picture: Getty)

    It’s actually an upgrade from Wonka’s factory, because there’s alcoholic milkshakes, hot chocolate and cocktails too.

    The festival isn’t just about shoving your face full of chocolate (yeah, it is).

    Get creative at the arts and crafts station, make your own chocolate statue and or commemorate the momentous occasion in the photo booth.

    Molten chocolate
    (Picture: Getty)

    The tour will start in Liverpool on 13 October and continue through 20 of the UK’s biggest cities including Manchester, Liverpool and Edinburgh.

    It’s bittersweet news for Londoners though, as the capital is the last stop in the calendar; the festival will arrive in the city on 20 April next year.

    There are two time slots to choose from and tickets cost just £6 but like any good festival, this is just the build-up – you can’t actually buy tickets yet.

    Register your interest on the Fantastical Chocolate Festival website and view the full list of dates here.

    MORE: A French Bulldog cafe is coming to London

    MORE: An afternoon tea made out of chocolate is coming to London

    MORE: A sausage dog cafe is coming to London


    Luxury mixed chocolate trufflesLuxury mixed chocolate trufflesallieabgarianAssorted handmade milk and dark chocolate pralines in a row.Molten chocolateLuxury mixed chocolate trufflesLuxury mixed chocolate trufflesallieabgarianAssorted handmade milk and dark chocolate pralines in a row.Molten chocolate

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    (Picture: Clare Mackintosh/Twitter)

    Sports – despite its hardcore following – can be quite a chore to keep up with. We get it.

    Especially when the game is a long one and it takes more than a day to finish, like cricket.

    Author Clare Mackintosh caught one particularly preoccupied woman on TV during the test cricket match between India and England.

    Clearly the spectator had better things to do than watch the actual match – like read a book.

    Clare noted that the lady was, in fact, reading a book she’d written herself, called I Let You Go.

    And now she’s on a mission to find the lady in question.

    ‘How can I track down this woman, spotted reading I Let You Go at yesterday’s test match?’ she wrote on Twitter.

    ‘I’d love to give her my other two books to thank her for the publicity. Please help me find her.’

    The avid reader was obviously too engrossed to look up from the mystery thriller.

    ‘It was such a lovely surprise to see my book on TV in the hands of a reader, and I’d love her to know how she brightened my day,’ Clare told Metro.co.uk.

    ‘I have signed copies of my other books waiting for her if she gets in touch.’

    Though most users on Twitter found the whole thing pretty hilarious, some questioned why you’d pay for a ticket to a live match and not watch it.

    ‘Maybe she went with family and friends who like the game,’ theorised one user.

    ‘I used to go with my grandad and did my homework, it’s like watching paint dry.’

    Sorry lads, some people would rather read a book (Picture: Mitchell Gunn/Getty Images)

    Others suggested that it may have been during a break.

    A few joked that it was the only way to make cricket interesting.

    If you know the woman or are her, do get in touch with Clare who will give you her other books, which we’re sure are equally as gripping as the one from the match.

    Who knows, it might be a great read for the next cricket match.

    MORE: Can you help find the dog that guided this man through depression and drug addiction?

    MORE: How to prepare for university now that results day is over

    MORE: Sorry Londoners, Manchester was voted the UK’s best city to live in


    Can you help find the woman who was too engrossed in a book during the cricket match?Can you help find the woman who was too engrossed in a book during the cricket match?faimabakar1Can you help find the woman who was too engrossed in a book during the cricket match?Can you help find the woman who was too engrossed in a book during the cricket match?faimabakar1

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    LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 22: Rochelle Humes, the face of New Look's SS18 campaign cuts the ribbon to unveil the brand new flagship (24,000 sq ft) New Look store on Oxford Street on March 22, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for New Look)
    (Picture: David M. Benett)

    The Saturdays singer Rochelle Humes was asked by hair brand John Frieda to become a ‘curl positivity’ ambassador to promote natural locks.

    This new role aims to encourage curl acceptance and is especially aimed at black women like Rochelle.

    Following the announcement, many people felt the singer turned TV presenter was an odd choice.

    As Rochelle’s own hair is the loose, highly glamourised curly hair style that’s already accepted in the mainstream, many thought it was problematic for her to represent more natural hairstyles worn by many black women.

    Instagram Photo

    ‘Pinch me quick,’ revealed Rochelle on her Instagram page to her fans.

    ‘I can’t actually believe I’m saying this but, I’m now the face of John Frieda’s Frizz Ease which was the first hair product I bought for my curls when I was a little girl.

    ‘I’ve actually landed my dream job – look mum.’

    Fans were divided though.

    ‘The trend with major brands in the UK natural hair scene is to idolise loose curls and wavy textures while tokenising the women with kinkier textures who created the scene,’ said Jay-Ann and Patrina Charles, founders of hair positivity blog Curlture, when speaking to Buzzfeed.

    ‘So this campaign was not surprising to us. It’s a huge faux pas to join ranks with John Frieda, a brand renowned for only catering to white women with loose waves.’

    ‘Curls acceptance? Her hair Insta page mainly features white and light-skinned women with curls that have always been accepted,’ wrote one user on Twitter.

    Many were also disheartened by the fact that Rochelle hasn’t used her celebrity status to talk about the hair of darker skinned black women enough.

    However, she does has a website called Curls Like Us where she and other women talk about struggles with their hair.

    The site shares hair with different types of textures and styles such as kinky hair which is described as type 4, with others labelled 4A, 4B and 4C, which is the most tightly coiled.

    Others also criticised the wording of the brand’s advert, with the strapline saying it’s for ‘demanding hair’

    ‘Demanding hair, sigh,’ wrote one user.

    ‘I’ve always hated the Frizz Ease commercials, they always showed a white woman with perfectly fine curly hair as “frizzy” and “unmanageable” before using the products, then her hair is “sleek” & “beautiful” afterwards. Always irritated me.’

    ‘It’s disgusting,’ wrote another.

    ‘Women with a hair texture that was mocked for centuries is the foundation of the natural hair movement, yet you don’t see these women reaping the financial rewards in a way that Rochelle is.

    ‘Jamelia has been doing the most about natural hair. Where is her collab?’

    We’ve contacted John Frieda for comment and will update this article accordingly.

    MORE: I’ve learned to embrace my afro with confidence but employers are still discriminating against black hair

    MORE: Mum slams Poundland for ‘sexist’ babygrows which ‘reinforce gender sterotypes’

    MORE: My teachers advised me against applying for Cambridge – a year on, I’ve just been accepted


    Rochelle Humes Opens New Look Flagship Store On Oxford StreetRochelle Humes Opens New Look Flagship Store On Oxford Streetfaimabakar1LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 22: Rochelle Humes, the face of New Look's SS18 campaign cuts the ribbon to unveil the brand new flagship (24,000 sq ft) New Look store on Oxford Street on March 22, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for New Look)Rochelle Humes Opens New Look Flagship Store On Oxford StreetRochelle Humes Opens New Look Flagship Store On Oxford Streetfaimabakar1LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 22: Rochelle Humes, the face of New Look's SS18 campaign cuts the ribbon to unveil the brand new flagship (24,000 sq ft) New Look store on Oxford Street on March 22, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for New Look)

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    SeaWorld TurtleTrek (Picture: SeaWorld Parks Entertainment)
    Every SeaWorld Parks booking is supporting conservation efforts around the world (Picture: SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment)

    Kicking back with a cocktail at Discovery Cove or riding one of Busch Gardens super coasters is helping support some incredible conservation efforts around the world.

    The SeaWorld Parks in Florida combine wildlife-inspired thrill rides, unforgettable family time with once-in-a-lifetime animal encounters.

    But did you know that by strapping into hypercoaster Mako at SeaWorld, or by braving the dizzying heights of brand new Ray Rush at Aquatica, that you supported the rescue of a 290lb melon-headed whale that was found stranded on a beach in Florida in July? Or that by snorkeling through The Grand Reef at Discovery Cove, the SeaWorld & Busch Gardens Conservation fund has been able to give over $15 million to 1,200 different organisations to support their conservation efforts around the world?

    SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment is dedicated to conservation, rescue and rehabilitation efforts. The SeaWorld & Busch Gardens Conservation Fund was set up in 2003 to make a difference to wildlife in need.

    Cheetah Hunt in Busch Gardens will give you the ride of your life (Picture: SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment)

    Science and Research

    As well as conducting its own research, the organisation also helps fund other initiatives around the globe through the SeaWorld & Busch Gardens Conservation Fund.

    The Rising Tide Conservation was set up to protect wild fish populations and the coral reefs where they live, by developing techniques to rear marine life away from these sensitive coral reef ecosystems.

    Get to know marine life by taking a swim in The Grand Reed (Picture: SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment)
    Get to know marine life by taking a swim in The Grand Reef (Picture: SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment)

    Guests interested in marine life research can also keep up to speed with OCEARCH.org, where SeaWorld and OCEARCH have teamed up to lead in the global protection of the oceans and its marine life.

    You can even track a few of SeaWorld’s rescued animals that have been returned to the wild. TJ, the dolphin, Gale, a pilot whale, and Iris, a harbour seal and keep track of their progress.

    Rescue and Rehabilitation

    In the past 50 years, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment has been able to help rescue over 33,500 animals, with a team on call to help any animals that are sick, injured or orphaned. The goal is get these animals back out into the wild after receiving top care, 365 days a year.

    Whether it’s a prosthetic beak for an injured bird or advanced formulas for orphaned baby animals, SeaWorld Park’s experts have created initiatives to help save lives.

    SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment has been able to help rescue over 33,500 animals (Picture: SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment)

    How can you make a difference?

    Guests in the UK and Ireland can make a difference by enjoying all of the thrills and spills at the SeaWorld Parks. Have fun, learn, do something unforgettable and help make a difference. Book the great value 3 for 2 SeaWorld, Aquatica & Busch Gardens Ticket from just £110pp including free parking. Or upgrade to include an all-inclusive day at Discovery Cove including a dolphin swim from just £80pp extra. Visit seaworldparks.co.uk to find out more.

     


    SeaWorld TurtleTrekSeaWorld TurtleTrekclairejrutterSeaWorld TurtleTrek (Picture: SeaWorld Parks Entertainment)Get to know marine life by taking a swim in The Grand Reed (Picture: SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment)SeaWorld TurtleTrekSeaWorld TurtleTrekclairejrutterSeaWorld TurtleTrek (Picture: SeaWorld Parks Entertainment)Get to know marine life by taking a swim in The Grand Reed (Picture: SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment)

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    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Westend61 GmbH / Alamy Stock Photo/Kieron)

    We don’t often appreciate lighthouses.

    We spot them when we’re on a seaside holiday, maybe snap a pic or two, and then let them drop out of our mind.

    Lighthouses are more than just pretty towers to pose against. They guide ships to safety and save lives as a result.

    To celebrate the impact of lighthouses as well as their beauty, author David Ross has visited 150 operational and abandoned lighthouses around the world, sitting on busy coastlines and isolate islands.

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

    Lighthouses: Beacons of the Sea shares the stories of lighthouses in South Korea, Saudi Arabia, and more, while showing off their beautiful architecture, too.

    Take a look below to celebrate some of the most incredible lighthouses in the world.

    Plover Scar Lighthouse in Morcambe Bay

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

     

    The Dry Tortugas Lighthouse at Loggerhead Key in Florida

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

     

    The Gadeokdo East Breakwater Lighthouse in South Korea

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

     

    Kjeungskjaer Lighthouse in Norway

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

     

    The Bressay Lighthouse in Shetland

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

     

    The Ban Tha Thewawong Lighthouse in Thailand

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

     

    West Pierhead Lighthouse in Cleveland Harbour in Ohio

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Tank_bmb | Dreamstime.com/Kieron)

     

    Outer Lighthouse at St Joseph North Pier on Lake Michigan

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Gnagel | Dreamstime.com/Kieron)

     

    Les Pâquis Lighthouse in Geneva

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Kieron)

     

    Jeddah Port Control Tower in Saudi Arabia

    Lighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover
    (Picture: Igor Groshev/Kieron)

    MORE: Stunning photos of colourful pigeons will make you see the birds in a new way

    MORE: Artist creates quirky snapshot pencil sketches within his travel pictures

     


    LIGHTHOUSESLIGHTHOUSESellencscottLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLIGHTHOUSESLIGHTHOUSESellencscottLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature coverLighthouses Beacons of the Seas Must link: http://www.amberbooks.co.uk/book/lighthouses/ Must feature cover

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    Matilda during her cancer treatment (Photo: Gabby Fisher)

    We were society’s traditional family unit: two parents and two children. Childhood cancer was never meant to be a part of it.

    Our first Christmas as a family of four was far from traditional. We spent it huddled in the hospital room our three-year-old daughter was confined to, watching more chemo being pumped into her body and listening to her cry out in pain from several of its side effects.

    Three weeks prior to this, Matilda had been diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and from that moment family life completely changed.

    The family unit quickly had to split into two to survive. Daddy stayed overnight with Matilda at the hospital whilst I spent my nights nursing her four month old brother, Marley, at home.

    Kissing Matilda goodnight and leaving her on that hospital bed every night for weeks on end was horrendous. Motherly instinct is screaming at you to stay… to be there with her.

    But in the weeks immediately following Matilda’s diagnosis we had to do whatever was best for both our children. Quite simply, we did whatever it took to cope and get through it.

    For us, that meant our family unexpectedly becoming stronger as two temporary parent and child teams. With each team trusting the other instinctively to take on unspoken, yet clearly defined new roles whilst both ultimately working for the same purpose.

    We have two children, which means childhood cancer hasn’t just affected Matilda’s childhood, but Marley’s too.

    (Photo: Gabby Fisher)

    Battling continuously to meet the needs of two extremely reliant children, in two very contrasting ways, has mounted huge pressure and strain on us. Matilda’s diagnosis has wiped any necessary consistency and routine from our life.

    Hospital has often had to be Marley’s second home, he has woken many mornings to only half a family at home, he has missed out on groups and activities with his own peers, he has been affected in so many ways.

    There have been many additional challenges on this journey due to the fact he is so young, and we can only hope that his youth will prevent any long lasting impact, and that he can finally know a life that doesn’t revolve around childhood cancer.

    Marriage has helped form and structure our family unit and Matilda’s cancer diagnosis has proved one of its toughest tests.

    To go from being husband and wife to mummy and daddy changes you as people and takes time, commitment and compromise to work. However, when the traditional family roles suddenly get shaken up and you must become not only a partner and a parent, but also a full time carer, the family’s sudden sole breadwinner, an unqualified at home nurse or a newly assigned appointment coordinator, your marriage is inevitably pushed to its limits.

    We’ve learnt to grow into these new family roles and, with a lot of trust and support, we have come together and become a stronger team because of it.

    It couldn’t be more true that childhood cancer doesn’t just affect the child themselves but the whole family.

    It’s the grandparents who become hands on parents again through their devotion, it’s the extended family who become closer through their understanding and it’s the friends who become part of your family through their support.

    When childhood cancer crashes in on your family, you realise that the family unit you thought you had is actually so much fuller than you ever knew.

    Gabby and her family are supporting the Cancer Research UK Kids & Teens Star Awards, in partnership with TK Maxx, which celebrate the strength and courage of children and young people facing cancer. For more information, please visit cruk.org. and read more about Gabby’s experience at facebook.com/adulting.abnormally

    MORE: Having a baby via donor conception has given me the family I always wanted

    MORE: Having cancer at 20 put my life on hold but it’s shown me what, and who, really matters

    MORE: After my daughter had cancer, I developed an app to improve the hospital experience for all children


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    Rachel Salisbury FB post
    Rachel’s post included what she was looking for and pictures of her (Photos: Rachel Salisbury)

    As a single woman living in London, it’s easy to get despondent. Everyone thinks it’s all Sex and the City but it’s often more of a Tinder nightmare.

    And in February this year, despondent is just how I felt. I was caught in a cycle that many singles will find all too familiar.

    I’d join dating apps, swipe, chat, bemoan the men who didn’t make an effort with their profiles, then end up deleting them all. Going on dates had begun to feel like a full time job, and I found it so impersonal.

    For me, there was a stigma about feeling lonely, as well as pressure to be an upbeat singleton, and I didn’t see any end to how I felt.

    Then, on 11 February, I was scrolling through Twitter when I saw a friend’s post, declaring she was engaged to her boyfriend of two years.

    She revealed that she’d met him after putting a post on Facebook; amazed, my tired-from-dating brain made a sudden decision. I’d do the same – what did I have to lose?

    Right there and then, I began typing. I described myself, and what I wanted, the qualities I was looking for in a man and a bit about ‘my type’.

    The idea was to reach out to friends of friends – maybe someone’s mum would say, ‘I know just the man for Rachel.’ Out of my circle of contacts, maybe someone would know someone who was right for me.

    I was on my own when the first reply came in: I felt like my heart had stopped, then I laughed because it was so unexpected.

    Some guys did a ‘pitch’ at the start of our conversation, which definitely made them stand out from the normal ‘hello’

    I was so scared that people would think I was desperate, or sad, or idiotic, so to read posts from people saying that they were inspired by what I was doing was absolutely amazing.

    The next morning I woke to a flurry of notifications – and my post appearing on news sites around the world. It was incredibly surreal. The post had gone viral and suddenly I felt very vulnerable and out of control.

    I hadn’t wanted my search for love to be so public but my Messenger inbox continued to ping over and over again with well-wishers, people saying they knew just how I felt, people saying that they were sure I’d meet someone.

    Of course, I also got messages from men. Men were contacting me from other countries wanting a date; men with whom I had no mutual Facebook friends wanted to take me on a date.

    Some men went straight in with ‘I’d like to take you out’; with others, we chatted a bit more first. Some guys did a ‘pitch’ at the start of our conversation, which I found incredibly sweet and definitely made them stand out from the normal ‘hello’.

    There was also a huge amount of women who got in touch on behalf of a male friend of theirs, who then set us up in a conversation and left us to chat. It was amazing to see all of these people looking out for each other, thinking of their friends who’d maybe admitted they would like to find someone too.

    I was incredibly flattered and honoured by anyone who took the time and effort to message me, but particularly for all of the cupids who helped me out by introducing me to someone. They had nothing to gain from doing that apart from the possibility of seeing their friend happy.

    So, has my wild gamble paid off? Did I meet someone?

    Well, let’s just say it’s been a very interesting journey since February – I’ve even turned my experience into a one-woman play, and I have a new motto: fortune favours the bold.

    MORE: I started a business on a first date, and now we’re married and the company is worth millions

    MORE: I saved a girl’s life by signing up to be a bone marrow donor – then she became the flower girl at my wedding

    MORE: Why is there such stigma attached to friendship apps when we all feel lonely at times?


    Rachel Salisbury FB postRachel Salisbury FB postrmve86Rachel Salisbury FB postRachel Salisbury FB postrmve86

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    (Picture: Ha Truong/Instagram)

    Asian Americans and generally those around the world are feeling seen since the release of blockbuster Crazy Rich Asians.

    That’s because one of the very few major studio films with a protagonist of Asian origin and one that doesn’t pander to usual stereotypes.

    Ha Truong is an Asian American who watched the film on opening day with her family.

    She was so inspired by it, particularly lead actress Constance Wu, that she made a DIY dress imitating the actress’s one for her five-year-old daughter Liv.

    Instagram Photo

    The Miami-based blogger got creative and made a replica of the blue Marchesa gown worn in the film.

    Ha, originally from Vietnam, shared why the film had such an impact on their lives.

    ‘When Liv was in preschool, her classmates would ask her if she’s Chinese,’ she wrote on her Instagram.

    ‘She’d come home asking if everyone (Asian) is Chinese; she’s Vietnamese and Thai.

    ‘She didn’t “see” herself at school and her peers didn’t see her.’

    Instagram Photo

    The mummy and daughter duo have been excited to watch the film and Ha revealed Liv has been trying to watch it nonstop.

    They’ve also both found a role model in Constance whose words have become a source of inspiration.

    ‘When Liv put on this dress, it gave her a spark,’ Ha added.

    ‘She calls out for me at random now and will say (Constance’s quote) “immigrant stories are stories of dreams, of love, of sacrifice, of courage, of honour”.

    Instagram Photo

    Instagram Photo

    ‘Liv got to see a reflection of her heritage,’ Ha told Teen Vogue.

    ‘She gets to see someone who worked hard and persevered to get to where she is. She gets to see someone who’s making her mark on the world. Constance is opening windows and doors for little girls, like Liv, to dream bigger.’

    ‘Being an Asian American, often times, you don’t see that Asian part of yourself in America, and neither do your peers. Crazy Rich Asians is proof that representation matters.

    ‘It’s refreshing to see someone on the big screen my daughter and my son can relate to. So many stories haven’t been told — and hopefully, this means more to come.’

    Crazy Rich Asians will be out in UK cinemas on 14 September

    MORE: K-pop star Eric Nam buys out Atlanta screening of Crazy Rich Asians ‘because we are important’

    MORE: Meet the Muslim women breaking boundaries in sports, comedy, dance, and modelling

    MORE: As a child I fell in love with Elvis. I’ve dedicated my life to impersonating him


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    (Picture: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

    The hajj pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, that Muslims around the world make every year has just started.

    Over two million followers of the Islamic faith will be gathering around the holy city, which has seen a 7% rise in visitor numbers this year compared to last year.

    In past years, there have been devastating stampedes as a result of overcrowding and structures collapsing.

    Now, Saudi’s cutting-edge logistics and expansion projects are working to help pilgrims have a smoother and safer experience.

    However, with such large numbers of visitors, hotel overcrowding – and this year’s weather and flood warnings – it can still be difficult for pilgrims to find a place of rest.

    Accommodation is also in high demand around the site and is not within financial means for many pilgrims.

    So, to modernise old practices (which sees many people sleeping outside in tents) and utilise space, nap pods reminiscent of Japan’s famed capsule hotels are being tested.

    A Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images
    (Picture: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

    The Kingdom is testing these capsule rooms in the western city of Mina as faithful pilgrims gather for the six-day hajj.

    Those seeking rest from the strenuous journey and rituals can use any of the 18-24 pods available for free.

    Each fibreglass pod is less than three metres long and includes a mattress, clean sheets, air conditioning and a lit mirror on the wall.

    A Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images
    (Picture: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

    Mansour al-Amer, head of the charity offering the capsules, the Haji and Mutamer Gift Charitable Association said it’s all about traveller comfort.

    ‘We are always thinking about pilgrims and how to make them more comfortable during the rituals of hajj,’ he said.

    ‘The idea already exists globally, in Japan for example, and in several cities across the world.

    ‘We believe it’s extremely well-suited for crowded places in our holy sites and in Mecca.’

    A Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images
    (Picture: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)
    A picture shows the inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images
    (Picture: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

    Organisers of the pods, which are imported from Japan, want those unable to afford hotels to be able to rest while travelling.

    Each napper will be given access to the capsule for three hours and then asked to hand it over to the next person. Workers will sterilise each capsule before the next occupier settles in.

    ‘The capsules work through a share economy, like bicycles that you can rent for an hour and then leave for someone else,’ added Amer.

    The capsules come in addition to the launch of Saudi Arabia’s ‘smart hajj’ initiative, which aims to help pilgrims with everything from travel plans to medical care and tens of thousands more security personnel across the pilgrimage site.

    The gathering comes to an end with Eid al-Adha, a three-day celebration.

    MORE: When is the Day of Arafat 2018 and how is it celebrated?

    MORE: When is Eid ul Adha 2018 and what is the story behind it?

    MORE: Meet the Muslim women breaking boundaries in sports, comedy, dance, and modelling


    Nap pods coming to Saudi Arabia for hajj season?Nap pods coming to Saudi Arabia for hajj season?faimabakar1A Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty ImagesA Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty ImagesA Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty ImagesA picture shows the inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty ImagesNap pods coming to Saudi Arabia for hajj season?Nap pods coming to Saudi Arabia for hajj season?faimabakar1A Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty ImagesA Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty ImagesA Saudi man sits inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty ImagesA picture shows the inside of a sleep pod in Mecca on August 16, 2018. - The free nap pods are part of new measures Saudi Arabia is rolling out this year in a bid to modernise the centuries-old practice of hajj. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP)AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images

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    (PA Real Life/Collect)

    A mother who gave birth to her baby on the toilet says she had no idea she was pregnant – and put the pain of contractions down to constipation.

    Sarah Bailey, 29, from North Yorkshire, had been experiencing severe stomach pains when she asked her mother Pat to go to the shop to buy her some laxatives.

    When the pains became more unbearable, the mum of three ended up on the toilet, feeling an overwhelming desire to push.

    But when Sarah began to lose massive amounts of blood, Pat, 60, took a look to see what was happening and uttered the unforgettable words, ‘You’re having a baby’.

    Sarah and David at the wedding, when she'd have been around two months pregnant (PA Real Life/Collect)
    Mum Sarah with husband David (PA Real Life/Collect)

    Worryingly, the baby, who Sarah has named Desirae, stopped breathing shortly after her birth but paramedics were able to resuscitate her.

    After Sarah’s mum Pat realised the baby was coming, Sarah’s husband David (who was downstairs looking after their other kids) called the ambulance.

    ‘It was so surreal,’ said Sarah. I could hear the voices and remember seeing a commotion around me, but it all felt miles away like I wasn’t really there.

    ‘I’d had no idea I was pregnant, let alone seconds away from giving birth.

    ‘When Desirae was born, I felt guilty that I’d been drinking and running around on my feet all day as normal while I’d not known she was there.

    ‘I asked the doctors if it was my fault she hadn’t been breathing at first, but they said it was just that her body had gone into shock.’

    Desirae in the ambulance after she was born (PA Real Life/Collect)
    The day Desirae was unexpectedly born (PA Real Life/Collect)

    Sarah hadn’t gained any noticeable weight and was still able to fit into her size 10 jeans.

    The positioning of her placenta which was in front of the uterus was masking the bump, medics later told her.

    She also thought she was still having regular monthly periods – but now knows the bleeding was actually her placenta slowly rupturing.

    After having twins in 2016, Sarah thought some of the pain and discomfort she was currently experiencing was down to her body recovering from the previous birth.

    Baby Desirae (PA Real Life/Collect)
    Desirae was a happy surprise for the family (PA Real Life/Collect)

    The whole labour process happened quickly before Sarah could realise what was happening.

    ‘It sounds graphic, but it was like big clots gushing from me,’ she said. ‘I felt like my bowel was going to fall out.

    ‘I felt so claustrophobic in that toilet. I was terrified. Mum deserves a medal, she was trying her best to reassure me that I’d be okay.

    ‘She examined me, and could see something but wasn’t sure what it was at first. Then, she suddenly realised and told me.

    Isabella and Desirae (PA Real Life/Collect)
    Big sis Isabella loves her younger sibling (PA Real Life/Collect)

    ‘I’d given birth very quickly with no pain relief, so my body was in complete shock, which is why I blacked out,’ she added.

    ‘All I wanted was my mum. At some point in hospital, I must’ve drifted off again, because suddenly I woke up and Mum was there at my bedside.

    ‘She said, “the baby is absolutely fine.” At first, I’d no idea what she meant. Then I remembered I had given birth.’

    Despite her unexpected arrival, Desirae was born at full term at a healthy 7lb 14oz.

    Sarah has since been treated for a womb infection and may need a blood transfusion, but is otherwise healthy.

    Dad David and their three kids; Rio, Isabella, and Tamiya are delighted with the latest addition to their family and soon shared the news on Facebook.

    MORE: Half of UK parents think it’s okay to swear in front of their children

    MORE: I asked my Facebook friends to help find me a boyfriend and it went viral

    MORE: My little girl’s cancer split our family in two, but we fought to keep it together


    PA Real Life-Sarah Bailey-Surprise babyPA Real Life-Sarah Bailey-Surprise babyfaimabakar1Sarah and David at the wedding, when she'd have been around two months pregnant (PA Real Life/Collect)Desirae in the ambulance after she was born (PA Real Life/Collect)Baby Desirae (PA Real Life/Collect)Isabella and Desirae (PA Real Life/Collect)PA Real Life-Sarah Bailey-Surprise babyPA Real Life-Sarah Bailey-Surprise babyfaimabakar1Sarah and David at the wedding, when she'd have been around two months pregnant (PA Real Life/Collect)Desirae in the ambulance after she was born (PA Real Life/Collect)Baby Desirae (PA Real Life/Collect)Isabella and Desirae (PA Real Life/Collect)

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    Festivals are meant to be fun but ‘most women’ are worried about their safety (Picture: Simone Joyner/Getty Images)

    Festival season should be a time of good cheer and escapism.

    But it’s not quite as simple as that, as Durham University research reveals that seven out of 10 women worry about the threat of sexual assault and harassment at events around the UK.

    Of the people surveyed, 30% of respondents had experienced of harassment and 10% gave evidence of assault. The equivalent figures for men rest at 5% and 1% respectively.

    At the moment, the study is small with 258 responses but researchers from the law school and sociology department are looking for more people to take part.

    The work sets to examine perceptions of festival safety in Britain.

    “These figures are shocking but not surprising as this is just more evidence that women fear for their safety at live music festivals,’ Mel Kelly of Safe Gigs for Women told The Guardian.

    ‘This fits anecdotally with what we hear every day. Hopefully organisers hear this and respond appropriately.’

    64% responded by with concerns over theft and acquisitive crime, though more than half mentioned worries about physical and sexual violence.

    The work follows on from a recent YouGov survey which found that one in five people (with more than two in five women under 40) have reported having been sexually assaulted or harassed at a UK festival.

    With those figures measure are being taken by some festivals to address the pervasive problem.

    Both Kendal Calling and Latitude have sexual assault referral centres on site and the Association of Independent Festivals ran a campaign last year to raise awareness about sexual violence at events.

    Festival Republic, the UK music promoter behind Reading and Leeds festivals, has also hosted Safe Gigs for Women at its festivals this year, as concerns rise about threats to attendees safety.


    Festival goers warned about the threat of measles.Festival goers warned about the threat of measles.franciscogarcia92Festival goers warned about the threat of measles.Festival goers warned about the threat of measles.franciscogarcia92

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    (Picture: Ben and Jerry’s)

    People probably scoffed at ice cream sandwiches when they first became a thing. And now the double-sided doughy goodness is loved by all.

    Now we’re going one further with the ice cream bagel.

    While bagels are a major breakfast staple, you don’t really think of them when eating dessert.

    But behold, ice cream makers Ben & Jerry’s has decided to combine their famed ice cream with what might have been their bagel business (we’ll explain later).

    You might prefer the round bread with salmon and cream cheese but think about a sweet loaf, bejewelled with sprinkles and gooey caramel sauce.

    Sounds pretty good right?

    (Picture: Ben and Jerry’s)
    (Picture: Ben and Jerry’s)

    Ben & Jerry’s is introducing what they say is London’s first ice cream bagel: a soft, chewy, Montreal-style bagel, with notes of maple syrup, topped with creamy new flavours.

    You can get the Birthday Bagel, a pink bagel filled with Ben & Jerry’s newest concoction which involves vanilla cake batter with pink frosting and strawberry swirls and cake chunks. And don’t forget the sprinkles.

    Or for those who like the best of both worlds, the Holey Cara-moley is a sweet but salty, lye-coated pretzel bagel nestled with scoops of the shop’s double caramel brownie and smothered in a gooey sauce.

    If that’s got you craving the delicious new stuff, you’ll need to head to Ben & Jerry’s Soho Scoop Shop in London.

    And you’ll need to do it fast because it’s only available for a limited time.

    (Picture: Ben and Jerry’s)

    Zara Hall, Scoop Shop guru, said: ‘Our co-founders Ben and Jerry opened up their first scoop shop way back in 1978, having considered opening a bagel business first.

    ‘So, 40 years on in our Soho Scoop Shop home, we’re paying homage to what might have been by rustling up the ultimate sweet-meets-savoury treat.  We think the Ice-Ice-Bagel is a pocket of deliciousness, come rain or shine’.

    Ice-Ice-Bagels will be exclusively available in Ben & Jerry’s Soho Scoop Shop on 74 Wardour Street, Soho from 24 August until 9 September.

    MORE: A chocolate festival is coming to the UK

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    MORE: Asda is going to sell a vegan cheeseboard this Christmas


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