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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    `People are enjoying ASOS's Bananas in Pyjamas inspired styling ASOS/ABC
    (Picture: ASOS/ABC)

    Day-ones of ASOS will know that the name is an acronym for as seen on screen.

    This meant that you could see what Lindsay Lohan or Jessica Simpson was wearing on MTV and grab yourself an affordable and chic version to wear to your local on a Friday night.

    Their current styling on their site, however, is channeling a very different celeb look – Bananas in Pyjamas.

    It was pointed out by Jenni Murtagh who got B in P vibes from their yellow boot/striped trouser combo.

    B1 and B2 might be unlikely style icons, but style icons they apparently are.

    The River Island boots have been paired with some rather PJ-like striped trousers, which is certainly a throwback to the two mischievous anthropomorphic fruit.

    The nightwear look is actually pretty trendy right now.

    However, looks would more likely be a silky negligee with blazer thrown on top or striped shirt with sport-luxe joggers. Not this.

    (Picture: Giphy)

    Jenni’s followers seemed to enjoy her comparison, with over 2,000 people liking her tweet, and plenty of laughing gifs underneath.

    Given that ASOS are known for breaking boundaries – the crop top for men and denim waistband are two recent examples – this is pretty tame and actually wearable.

    Nostalgia never goes out of style, so why not recreate the style?

    Alternatively, go for an iconic Tracy Beaker jumper or dress up as CBBC’s The Raven.

    We’ve reached out to ASOS to find out which other giant fruits we should be resembling this autumn, but we think it might just be apples and oranges to them as they’ve yet to reply.


    People are enjoying ASOS's Bananas in Pyjamas inspired stylingPeople are enjoying ASOS's Bananas in Pyjamas inspired stylingjessicacvlPeople are enjoying ASOS's Bananas in Pyjamas inspired stylingPeople are enjoying ASOS's Bananas in Pyjamas inspired stylingjessicacvl

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    If you are reading this through bleary eyes while mainlining your second coffee of the day, you’re in good company.

    It’s a rare person who can boast that they get enough sleep.

    Self-inflicted late nights, work-related early mornings, kids, insomnia or unsettled sleep are a feature of life.

    Sick man sleeping in bed

    In fact, lack of sleep is one of the most common complaints of our time: Four out of five people in Britain suffer disturbed or inadequate – so-called ‘toxic’ – sleep.

    But, how much sleep do we really need? Received wisdom suggests eight hours a night – but experts actually disagree.

    According to Dr Chris Idzikowski of the Edinburgh Sleep Centre, anywhere between five and a half and nine and a half is normal, depending on the individual.

    ‘It’s when a person gets less than their constitution demands it is then that they suffer,’ he says.

    More useful is to look at the quality of the sleep you’re getting. Better sleep = more refreshed, no matter how much time you have.

    Whether you’re operating on 4, 8 or 10 hours, here’s how to make sure your sleep is as good as it can be.

    Starting with….

    TECH BAN

    Increasingly hard to pull off now most of us use our mobiles for alarms, reading, music and more.

    However, using devices in the bedroom is one of the biggest blockers to good sleep hygiene.

    Why? Many reasons. Looking at work emails and life admin creates the wrong mental state for relaxation and can send the mind into active mode when it should be winding down.

    The blue light of smartphone screens mimics daylight which in turn inhibits the formation of the sleep hormone melanin.

    And having your phone next your bed promotes middle-of-the-night clock watching, which is one of the big no-nos when trying to get back to sleep.

    Ideally, you would stop use of all devices at least an hour before bed to allow your brain to switch off naturally.

    Over-active thinking patterns keep the mind alert. Do the classic tip of keeping a note pad by your bed instead – if things you need to do pop into your mind, write them down to check on in the morning and free your mind for sleep.

    And keep your phone outside the door where you can still hear the alarm – or better yet, get an old-school analogue alarm clock and leave your phone downstairs.

    woman sleeping on desk
    Living with depression can have a negative impact on your sleep (Picture: Ella Byworth)

    EXERCISE

    …but not too close to bedtime. Vigorous exercise releases cortisol, which can disrupt natural sleep patterns. So, keep your HIIT workout for the morning and make sure anything you do in the three hours before bed is gentle – think a walk, stretching or yoga.

    Light exercise can help your body to wind down ready for sleep.

    YOGA

    …which brings us on to yoga. A flexible, pain-free body allows for longer and deeper rest. Many with back or hip pain will know how irritating it is to be woken by a throbbing joint that prevents you going back to sleep. If yoga is not for you, try other practices that can help maintain flexibility: tai chi, Pilates, foam rolling, general stretching. YouTube has myriad videos that can help with a ‘stretching for sleep’ program.

    Light exercise, stretching and massage all help blood flow, says Idzikowski. ‘One of the things the brain does as we try to sleep is to reduce the core temperature by opening the blood vessels to the hands and feet.

    ‘So this helps set the body up for what the brain would do naturally anyway.’

    EAT EARLY

    You may have heard of foods that assist sleep: Turkey, bananas, warm milk – usually foods rich in tryptophan, an amino acid that promotes sleep, or lactocarium, a nervous system sedative (found in lettuce).

    According to Idzikowski though, evidence of this link between specific ingredients and sleep is scarce. More important is the time you eat: that means no big meals less than three hours before bedtime.

    vegan illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    ALCOHOL

    As Shakespeare said, it provokes the desire but takes away the performance. He wasn’t talking about sleep, of course, but the same applies. Getting sloshed might make it a lot easier to drop off (pass out?) but the sleep you get will be unsettled and poor quality as your body deals with sugar levels plummeting and the liver metabolising the alcohol.

    One or two is fine, one or two bottles not so much.

    PAMPER YOURSELF

    A word up there in the irritation stakes with ‘moist’, but we are wheeling it out to cover off the pre-bedtime self-care routine.

    According to Mr Idzikowski, that pleasant-but-cliched pre-sleep prep really does help.

    A warm bath will gently elevate your body temperature before the subsequent drop, which causes drowsiness.

    A scented candle and soft music can create a restful atmosphere.

    And lavender sprays, candles or pillows can relax the nervous system. Brain scans in sleep studies have shown that lavender slows the heart rate and increases slow wave deep sleep – and while other studies argue about just how effective lavender is, it is unanimously accepted that as part of a good sleep routine, lavender is beneficial.

    It all sounds so silly and superficial until you try it as part of a bigger plan and you realise that it makes sense.

    ‘It’s about changing the conditions of an unhealthy sleep environment, which can instantly make people sleep better,’ Mr Idzikowski says.

    sleep well
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    GET NATURAL DAYLIGHT

    Sunlight regulates your internal body clock. A walk in the midday sun will help your body find its natural rhythm.

    BUT KEEP YOUR ROOM DARK

    A peaceful, dark room promotes good sleep, no question. Light coming into the room is a powerful trigger for the brain to wake up. If you can’t make your room particularly dark, get a sleep mask. Anecdotally, they also help people struggling to sleep when it is dark – the light pressure holding your eyes gently closed keeps you in sleep mode.

    See also: white noise to block out ambient sounds or ear plugs.

    Last and least possible…

    GO TO BED AND GET UP AT THE SAME TIME EACH DAY

    In theory of course this is an excellent idea. Once your body clock knows what’s expected of it, it is more likely to fall into line. Sleep late and sleep in on the weekends and you’ll wake up with a Monday morning sleep hangover.

    Avoid it by setting your alarm for the same time each morning and becoming that smug one who has done a day’s worth of fun stuff before your mates have even woken up.

    Admittedly this one means forsaking your social life but, you know, what price a good night’s sleep?

     

    SPEED NEEDN'T MEAN COMPROMISING ON QUALITY - Costa Express means real beans, real milk, really quick.

    As a nation we are completely accustomed to expecting convenience. Express food, express trains, express manicures – and express coffee.

    But just because we get something fast, it doesn’t mean we expect it to be lesser quality.

    With Costa Express can guarentee that your, morning cup will be made with fresh milk and beans of the highest quality and ready in seconds

    In fact no less than 112 variations of Arabica and Robusta coffee beans were blind tested to create their ‘Mocha Italia’, the signature blend you’ll find in Costa Express machines.

    The beans that make their way into the coffee are truly the very best; only 1% of the world’s beans make the grade.


    This sleep technique gets you to sleep in one minute - better than the ArmyThis sleep technique gets you to sleep in one minute - better than the Armyakismet-2fcb28243f975bb512a587b829a23dfdSick man sleeping in bedwoman sleeping on deskvegan illustrationssleep wellThis sleep technique gets you to sleep in one minute - better than the ArmyThis sleep technique gets you to sleep in one minute - better than the Armyakismet-2fcb28243f975bb512a587b829a23dfdSick man sleeping in bedwoman sleeping on deskvegan illustrationssleep well

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    Mandatory Credit: Photo by REX/Shutterstock (8565250a) MODEL RELEASED Friends clinking red wine glasses VARIOUS
    (Picture: REX/Shutterstock)

    Landlubbers need not apply for this one, but Londoners with their sea legs are very welcome.

    It’s the city’s first ever floating festival, where you can chat about a wine’s bouquet while looking at the skyline from the Thames.

    Wine Over Water will be docking at Albert Embankment on the Tamesis Dock boat next weekend.

    All the tipples will be from Wanderlust Wines, and you’ll be able to meet the winemakers themselves.

    There will be tasting competitions – so bring your a-game – with cases of the stuff to be won, and special trend-led booths.

    London's first floating wine festival is coming to get you drunk on the Thames Provider: tdock.co.uk
    (Picture: tdock.co.uk)

    For your ticket price of £25 you’ll get eight wine samples (one each from Hungary, South Africa, France, Italy, Romania, Australia, New Zealand and the UK) and you can buy any that you like by the glass, or by case to be delivered to you at a later date.

    Food available on the boat is ‘marine themed’, which means you can probably expect some decent seafood and maybe even a humble chip to accompany your plonk.

    If you head to the upper deck of Tamesis Dock you can grab an amazing view of Big Ben (even if it is being done up right now) and the Houses of Parliament.

    All while getting tipsy on sustainable wines? Oh, go on then.

    The festival is on Saturday 22 and Sunday 23 September 2018 with two sessions daily from 11am to 2pm and 2.15pm to 5pm.

    Tickets are £25 including eight tasting samples. Get yours here.

    MORE: Hot sun, quiet beaches and good food: How a glamping trip to Croatia turned out to be the best of both worlds

    MORE: You should have two days off drinking every week, health chiefs advise


    London's first floating wine festival is coming to get you drunk on the ThamesLondon's first floating wine festival is coming to get you drunk on the ThamesjessicacvlMandatory Credit: Photo by REX/Shutterstock (8565250a) MODEL RELEASED Friends clinking red wine glasses VARIOUSLondon's first floating wine festival is coming to get you drunk on the Thames Provider: tdock.co.ukLondon's first floating wine festival is coming to get you drunk on the ThamesLondon's first floating wine festival is coming to get you drunk on the ThamesjessicacvlMandatory Credit: Photo by REX/Shutterstock (8565250a) MODEL RELEASED Friends clinking red wine glasses VARIOUSLondon's first floating wine festival is coming to get you drunk on the Thames Provider: tdock.co.uk

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Fleas might be tiny creatures, but they can be a giant pain for you and your cat.

    The fleas usually found on cats (Ctenocephalides felis) are extremely common, and they can be a problem even in the cleanest homes.

    Cats can pick up these bloodsucking parasites outside, but indoor cats are not safe from fleas either, as you can unwittingly bring them inside on your shoes and clothing.

    Fleas live from anywhere between 14 days to a whole year, and one female can lay a horrifying 50 eggs a day.

    Signs that your cat has fleas include:

    • Scratching themselves excessively
    • Dark specks in your cat’s fur
    • Small brown or black insects
    • Bald spots and red patches
    • Spots on your cat’s skin
    • Red, irritated or thickened skin

    The dark specks are flea droppings or ‘flea dirt’ and indicate the presence of fleas.

    Unexplained insect bites on your body, particularly on the lower legs, ankles and feet, are also a sign to look out for.

    If you’re still unsure, you can perform a simple comb test.

    Use a fine-toothed comb to go through your pet’s fur, wiping the teeth of the comb on to a piece of kitchen paper after each stroke. Any fleas or flea droppings in your cat’s fur will be deposited on to the surface of the paper.

    If your cat has fleas, make sure you treat them as soon as possible.

    Fleas are irritating and uncomfortable for your pet, but they can also be very dangerous for kittens and frail cats because the blood loss can lead to anaemia.

    Some cats are hypersensitive to flea saliva and can have an allergic reaction to being bitten.

    Fleas can also transmit tapeworms if they are accidentally swallowed by cats during grooming.

    Cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) in cat hairs. (Picture: Getty)

    Because the vast majority (95%) of fleas will live in your home environment rather than on your pet, an untreated flea problem can turn into a serious infestation issue that requires professional pest control in a matter of weeks.

    Just ignoring the problem is a very bad idea.

    When treating fleas, the mistake that many pet owners make is to just medicate their cat.

    To properly get rid of fleas, you need take a two pronged approach, where your home and cat are both treated at the same time.

    Always go to your local vet and ask them for the most effective flea treatment products.

    Fleas are highly adaptable creatures and they quickly become immune to the chemicals we use to kill them. Products in pet shops might not be up to date and if they don’t work, your money will have been wasted and the fleas will still be breeding and feeding on your cat.

    Your vet will probably give you a liquid flea treatment that’s appropriate for the size and weight of your feline friend. Too small a dose won’t be effective and too high a dose could make your cat poorly.

    It’s usually administered to the skin on the back of a cat’s neck, where they can’t lick it off.

    Make sure you part the fur and get the product on the skin so it can be properly absorbed.

    Your vet will be able to recommend a spray for your house, as fleas can survive without a living host for several months at a time.

    The parasites like to live in soft furnishings like carpets, cushions, upholstery and anywhere that your pet enjoys sleeping, such as a bed or blanket.

    You should try to wash as much of your soft furnishing as possible at a high temperature, change your bed sheets regularly and wash your cat’s bed.

    If your cat is doing more scratching than normal, you might need to check them for fleas. (Picture: Getty)

    Before spraying, hoover your carpets, skirting boards, hard floors and furniture to suck up as many fleas and flea eggs as possible, spray then hoover again.

    Dispose of your hoover bag after each use and spray the parts of your vacuum cleaner that come into contact with surfaces in your home.

    Keeping up a strict regime of vacuuming will ensure you destroy fleas at every stage of their life cycle until they’re completely gone.

    It sounds like a hassle, but these steps are essential for a flea-free home.

    Georgie Hearne, vet at national pet charity Blue Cross, told Metro.co.uk: ‘Not only can fleas make your cat uncomfortable, sore and itchy – they can also pose a serious health risk.

    ‘Flea infestations can cause anaemia due to the amount of blood a cat can lose to the parasites and it can be fatal, especially in kittens.

    ‘The only way to prevent your cat from getting fleas is by using regular, good quality flea control which is recommended by your vet. Your home and other pets in the household may also need to be treated.’

    Most vets will recommend that you treat your cat for fleas throughout the year to reduce the likelihood of an infestation occurring.

    Fleas are resistant little bloodsuckers, so don’t underestimate them – for your sake as well as your cat’s.

    MORE: Rescue dog with an incredibly expressive face is now an Instagram star

    MORE: Inside the secret world of London’s urban foxes


    gettyimages-887603104gettyimages-887603104hpwilliamsongettyimages-887603104gettyimages-887603104hpwilliamson

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    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    The farmhouse served as the backdrop for The Darling Buds of May (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    A countryside home that served as the backdrop for The Darling Buds of May is up for sale for £3 million.

    Buss Farm is known for being the idyllic setting of the classic television adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel.

    The Kentish farmhouse in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series.

    The property is set within 35 acres and is made up of four buildings, including a traditional red brick farmhouse and two storey oast house.

    It’s expected to be extremely popular with buyers wanting a piece of ‘television history.’

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    The property is made up of three individual homes that can be bought together or separately (Picture: Savills / SWNS)
    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    The Barn (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    There is a further barn currently used for recreational facilities which could also be converted subject to planning.

    Buss Farm was restored by devoted Buds of May fan Simon Coulson who bought the property in 2012.

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    He spent five years transforming the buildings into holiday homes which attracted fans from all over the world, eager to relive the ‘perfick’ lives of the Larkin family.

    He said: ‘It feels like a piece of Kent that has been lost in time.

    ‘It’s off the beaten track and there are no noisy roads.’

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    One of the building’s kitchens (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    After spending £1 million on its renovation, Simon has put the property on the market for triple the price.

    He continued: ‘I loved the TV show and as the farm was in a dilapidated state when it came on the market I wanted to restore it so that people could relive a bit of the TV magic.

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    The countryside land surrounding the home (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    ‘I’ve done everything I can at Buss Farm and I’m looking for another countryside estate to do it all again.’

    The farm is set on 35 acres of land, with the 18th century Grade II listed farmhouse at its centrepiece.

    But if nobody decides to buy it, the property will be offered up as separate homes.

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    The living area of the The Barn (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    The Barn, a curtilage listed timber framed conversion, can be bought for £795,000.

    It has two bedrooms, a grand reception room and a stylish kitchen with bi-fold doors that look out onto the garden with a pond, varieties of mature trees and parking for up to four cars.

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    One of the property’s bedrooms (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    At just £350,000, the more modest Cart Lodge offers 600 square feet of accommodation including two bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms.

    The most recognisable building at Buss Farm is Oast House, a two-storey conversion spread across more than 1,000 square feet on the market for £800,000.

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    The home sits by a lake (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    The more traditional farmhouse is the largest of the individual properties. It features four bedrooms and is up for sale at £800,000.

    Sarah Simmonds, from Savills in Cranbrook who is handling the sale, said: ‘We anticipate a high level of interest from both domestic and international buyers, who will be keen to take advantage of this rare opportunity to buy a piece of television history.

    NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'
    Cart Lodge is on sale for £350,000 (Picture: Savills / SWNS)

    ‘Buss Farm is not only a tremendous opportunity for a family to own a beautiful Kentish farmstead, but with the inclusion of the holiday accommodation, it offers a significant business opportunity to capitalise upon the popularity of the Darling Buds of May.’

    ‘There are few other places in the United Kingdom where holidaymakers can stay in the actual location of a well-known television series.

    ‘With fast and frequent rail series to London and excellent links to the continent, Buss Farm is ideally located as a tourist destination.’

    MORE: You can only reach this £750,000 house in Scotland by hopping on a boat or walking for 16 miles

    MORE: What I Rent: Jack, £700 a month for a room in a two-bedroom flat in Wimbledon


    SEI_29295511-fb18SEI_29295511-fb18hattiegladwellmetroNB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'SEI_29295511-fb18SEI_29295511-fb18hattiegladwellmetroNB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'NB - Please note these pictuers were sent out earlier today with an incorrect caption - the correct caption is below This 'perfick' countryside home that inspired the Darling Buds of May is up for sale - with a ?3million price tag. See National News story NNFARM; Buss Farm is forever ingrained in television history as the idyllic backdrop to the classic adaptation of the H.E. Bates novel. The charming Kentish farmstead in Bethersden was once home to David Jason and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who starred in the 1990s ITV hit series which launched the Welsh actress's career. The property is set within 35 acres and comprises of four buildings including a traditional red brick farmhouse and iconic two storey oast house and is expected to be hotly pursued by buyers wanting a piece of 'television history.'

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    office, work, woman, career
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    In September 2017, my employer, IVF company Access Fertility, switched to a four-day working week.

    A year on, the staff love it; we’re more available to our patients and there have been no negative consequences for the business. I’m amazed more companies don’t take the leap.

    I still work full-time hours – 8am to 6pm, four days a week – but I get a full extra day off work.

    You get used to the hours pretty quickly, and finishing at 6pm, whether I’m heading home or out for the evening, doesn’t really change anything.

    The early start was a bit tough to begin with, but now that I’m used to it, I don’t really notice. I roll out of bed, have a tea and cycle in. I did that when I started at 9am too.

    An extra day is huge and so much better than a slightly longer evening.

    I can squeeze in a mini-break without taking leave, visit family, take in a museum without the weekend crowds or complete boring life admin that would otherwise eat into my weekend.

    I’ve come to love my midweek day off. You get that Friday feeling on a Tuesday.

    Last weekend, I hopped on a ferry and cycled across a chunk of Normandy while most people were still at their desks.

    Over the past year, I’ve also done a tour of London’s museums (I’m pretty much the only one there).

    One of my colleagues is using her free day to visit venues and plan her wedding, another uses it to pursue his passion for board games and obscure cinema.

    There are some challenges.

    The longer hours and having to complete all your work in four days can be tiring. One person has an uncomfortably early 5.30am start to make it from Oxford to our offices in Farringdon.

    The company couldn’t simply close on Fridays, so we extended our opening hours and switched to a shifting work pattern.

    Everyone gets a day off, but the day of the week varies – Wednesday one week, Thursday the next and so on.

    It sounds strange but it works, and everyone gets regular three-day weekends too.

    I’ve come to love my midweek day off. You get that Friday feeling on a Tuesday.

    Because we’re open five days a week for longer hours, we’re actually more available to our patients, not less.

    IVF is a sensitive area and a lot of our patients appreciate being able to call before or after work.

    The biggest challenge has been ensuring we have the right staffing levels.

    We have fewer people in the office on any given day, so sickness or holiday can have a big impact.

    We’ve had to do some careful planning of free days to ensure everything runs smoothly, but I’ve found people are sensible and willing to be flexible so long as they’re involved and can see the benefits to them and the company – which they can.

    Access Fertility is the kind of company you might expect to make this change – we’re a start-up (12 employees), young and mostly digital.

    But the only thing that’s really mattered is that we’re not stuck in a ‘that’s what we’ve always done’ mind-set.

    People seem to think a four-day week means compromising the business to be nice to staff. That hasn’t been my experience at all.

    The four-day week works well for the company and for staff. It hasn’t been a trade-off. We’ve lost nothing and gained a lot.

    The benefits would translate to companies like ours and many that aren’t, and their businesses and staff would be all the better for it.

    MORE: If we all worked a four-day week, we’d be healthier, according to science

    MORE: Does four-day week + three-day weekend = less stress? We’ve done the maths…

    MORE: Four-day work week trial so successful company might make it permanent


    All the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workAll the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workqinxieAll the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workAll the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workqinxie

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    The 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing line
    (Picture: Instagram)

    Thylane Blondeau, daughter of footballer Patrick Blondeau and fashion designer Veronika Loubryand, has been involved in the world of fashion since the age of four.

    When she was just six years old, people called her the ‘world’s most beautiful girl’.

    Ethics about whether the beauty of children should be judged in the first place aside, it came as little surprise that Thylane became a model in her teens.

    The 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing line
    (Picture: Instagram/ Heaven May)

    At 17, she’s a brand ambassador for L’Oreal Paris, has modelled for Jean Paul Gaultier and Dolce & Gabbana, and has been named as the face of Lolita Lempicka perfume.

    She’s now designing her own clothing line called Heaven May.

    On Instagram, Blondeau shared a photo with the caption: ‘After working more than one year for you guys, HEAVEN MAY CLOTHING (my brand) is coming out really soon !!

    ‘I can’t wait for u guys to see all the collection I made :)))) Ily and thank u for ur support’.

    Her fans seem excited, with one user commenting: ‘So so proud and happy for you, gorgeous! We can’t wait to see all your incredible designs’.

    There isn’t a release date yet and the Heaven May website just shows a teaser with a sign up option, but the brand’s Instagram features Blondeau largely wearing what seems to be comfortable sportswear.

    From this, we can assume that the collection will include jogging bottoms, oversized t shirts and hoodies.

    The 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing line
    A possible Heaven May design? (Picture: Instagram/ Heaven May)

    Thylane Blondeau isn’t the first child to follow in the footsteps of a model parent.

    Lily Rose Depp, daughter of French model Vanessa Paradis, has graced the cover of British Vogue and starred in a Chanel campaign, while Lila Grace Moss, daughter of Kate Moss, as the face of London’s The Braid Bar’s spring 2017 campaign.

    The casting of Moss raised questions of cultural appropriation and the ethics of choosing a white girl to model cornrows.

    Blondeau’s 2.4 million Instagram followers will just have to await the first Heaven May collection with bated breath.

    MORE: Dolls Kill’s ‘Lolita’ collection criticised for sexualizing children

    MORE: Rescue dog with an incredibly expressive face is now an Instagram star


    The 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing lineThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing linehpwilliamsonThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing lineThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing lineThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing lineThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing lineThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing linehpwilliamsonThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing lineThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing lineThe 'most beautiful girl in the world' is launching her own clothing line

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    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festival image of punters at Newcastle Pride by @stevenbrunton. 'Such a fun image! Thanks for posing for the photo guys ' - Posted 23 July
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@stevenbrunton)

    If you spend hours curating your Instagram feed, you’ll be delighted to know you can now be rewarded for your efforts – as there’s now awards for those dedicated to the app.

    The Photobox Instagram Photography Awards is a celebration of the best photography posted to Instagram.

    Today the awards revealed the shortlisted images from this year’s entries.

    Here’s a lovely picture of Ted the poodle

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Animals & Pets image of Ted the Poodle in Gosforth, Newcastle, by @darrenwilliamhall. 'Super Ted' - Posted on 12 August
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@darrenwilliamhall)

     

    This is a Style photo by Adam Riley

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Art/Culture & Style image by Adam Riley (@adampriley). ???England 2017??? ??? posted on May 4
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@adampriley)

     

    A black and white image of a rugby match in Newick

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Sports image of rugby match in Newick by @mww2108. 'Match day ..... with mud ....' - Posted on 12 February
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@mww2108)

     

    A Travel image of Niagara Falls was also shortlisted

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of Niagra by @leedslassie. Posted on 6 March.
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@leedslassie

     

    A #NoFilter image of Regent Street

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted #NoFilter image of Regent Street by @andresson.photography. ???What a best way to finish your day photographing and you have this shot opportunity while you???re on the bus. Best bus ride ever.??? ??? posted on March 13
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@andresson)

     

    Another Style image of a man in a waiting room

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Art/Culture & Style image of a man in a waiting room by @traverserlepaysage. 'A??roport international' - posted on 19 July
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@traverserleypaysage)

     

    This is an amazing black and white photo of lightning

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Landscape image of lightning by @patlyr2052
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@patlyr2052)

     

    A family image of the Fiddler on the Roof cast at the Cardiff Open Air Theatre

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Family image of the Fiddler on the Roof cast at the Cardiff Open Air Theatre by @musotravels. 'Mothers meeting. Don???t be fooled, it???s raucous affair. A lot of love for these women!' - Posted on 28 July
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@musotravels)

     

    A lovely landscape image of the Seven Sisters Cliffs

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Landscape image of the Seven Sisters Cliffs by @mariacostantinaseri. Posted on 20 July
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@mariacostantinaseri)

     

    A #Love image of a couple in Paris

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted #Love image of a couple on the Paris Metro by @guilhphoto. 'Dans cette rame bond??e, ?? l'abri des regards indiscrets tels que le mien, ce couple profitait de son union sans pr??ter une seule attention ?? ce que pouvais penser le reste de la rame. En me penchant vers eux, les regards des parisiens m'ont foudroy?? et les mains se sont resserr??es devant moi, comme pour hurler de les laisser tranquille car bien que tout le monde ai pu constater leur profond baisers, personne n'a os?? y pr??ter un oeil par respect, respect qu'il m'a plu de briser.' - posted on 10 June
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@guilhphoto)

     

    Here’s another Style image – of a man reading in London

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Arts/Culture & Style image of a man reading in London by @gflandre. 'The reader. Learning to London' - Posted on 20 June
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@gflandre)

     

    Here’s a shortlisted Festivals image of Esplanade Lamartine, Ville de Marcon, following the 2018 World Cup

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festivals image of Esplanade Lamartine, Ville de Marcon, following the 2018 World Cup by @gaelfontany. '?? Champions! ??Esplanade Lamartine - Ville de M??con. Finale coupe du monde 2018.' - Posted 15 July
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@gaelfontany)

     

    A Travel image of Benagil Cave, in Portugal

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of Benagil Cave, in Portugal, by @blu3willow. Posted 14th August
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@blu3willow)

     

    This image represents the ‘Reinvention and freedom of expression in teenagers’

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Fashion image by @freyaaaart. 'Reinvention and freedom of expression in teenagers' - posted on 17 May
    (Picture: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards/@freyaaaart)

     

    Here’s a man on the beach, taken for a Travel photo, Nouvelle-Aquitaine

    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of a man at the beach in Nouvelle-Aquitaine by @olivierseni. Posted on 1 August
    Caption: Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of a man at the beach in Nouvelle-Aquitaine by @olivierseni. Posted on 1 August

    The awards were launched in July, with PIPAs debut year attracting over 180,000 entries in less than three weeks – and it’s quickly become one of the world’s biggest photography competitions in history, and the largest of its kind on Instagram.

    There was a lot of competition for Instagrammers, especially to reach the final round of judging across ten diverse categories, ranging from fashion to festivals, arts to animals, and the sites most used hashtags: #Love and #NoFilter.

    Gathering in London, the panel of industry-leading experts, including The Guardian’s former Picture Editor Eamonn McCabe, Editor-in-Chief at Cosmopolitan Farrah Storr, and Lecturer in Photography at Kingston University Paul Postle, selected the very best submissions that celebrate the beauty in everyday life.

    The shortlisted images include a Boxer puppy swimming in the sea, a snap of brotherly love and a stream of people trekking along the White Cliffs of Dover.

    Rory Scott of Photobox, Chair of PIPAS 2018 judges, said: ‘From snapping our supper to capturing our canine friends, most of us like to test our everyday photography skills on Instagram.

    ‘But being such a popular site, we often miss out on some of the truly stunning photography on our feeds.

    ‘We received over 180,000 incredible submissions to the PIPAs and we are delighted to announce ten category shortlists, one of whom will be crowned our overall Instagram Photograph of the Year next month.’

    Commenting on the judging process, Farrah Storr, Editor-in-Chief of Cosmopolitan, said: ‘The shortlisted pictures need to be something that would make you stop when you’re scrolling through Instagram.’

    The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in central London on 3 October 2018. The overall ‘Instagram Photograph of the Year’ winner will receive £5,000, with an additional £500 awarded for each of the ten category winners.

    MORE: People are enjoying ASOS’s Bananas in Pyjamas inspired styling

    MORE: What do sex dolls say about a woman’s role in the world?


    Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festival image of punters at Newcastle Pride by @stevenbrunton. 'Such a fun image! Thanks for posing for the photo guys ' - Posted 23 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festival image of punters at Newcastle Pride by @stevenbrunton. 'Such a fun image! Thanks for posing for the photo guys ' - Posted 23 JulyhattiegladwellmetroPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festival image of punters at Newcastle Pride by @stevenbrunton. 'Such a fun image! Thanks for posing for the photo guys ' - Posted 23 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Animals & Pets image of Ted the Poodle in Gosforth, Newcastle, by @darrenwilliamhall. 'Super Ted' - Posted on 12 AugustPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Art/Culture & Style image by Adam Riley (@adampriley). ???England 2017??? ??? posted on May 4Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Sports image of rugby match in Newick by @mww2108. 'Match day ..... with mud ....' - Posted on 12 FebruaryPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of Niagra by @leedslassie. Posted on 6 March.Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted #NoFilter image of Regent Street by @andresson.photography. ???What a best way to finish your day photographing and you have this shot opportunity while you???re on the bus. Best bus ride ever.??? ??? posted on March 13Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Art/Culture & Style image of a man in a waiting room by @traverserlepaysage. 'A??roport international' - posted on 19 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Landscape image of lightning by @patlyr2052Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Family image of the Fiddler on the Roof cast at the Cardiff Open Air Theatre by @musotravels. 'Mothers meeting. Don???t be fooled, it???s raucous affair. A lot of love for these women!' - Posted on 28 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Landscape image of the Seven Sisters Cliffs by @mariacostantinaseri. Posted on 20 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted #Love image of a couple on the Paris Metro by @guilhphoto. 'Dans cette rame bond??e, ?? l'abri des regards indiscrets tels que le mien, ce couple profitait de son union sans pr??ter une seule attention ?? ce que pouvais penser le reste de la rame. En me penchant vers eux, les regards des parisiens m'ont foudroy?? et les mains se sont resserr??es devant moi, comme pour hurler de les laisser tranquille car bien que tout le monde ai pu constater leur profond baisers, personne n'a os?? y pr??ter un oeil par respect, respect qu'il m'a plu de briser.' - posted on 10 JunePhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Arts/Culture & Style image of a man reading in London by @gflandre. 'The reader. Learning to London' - Posted on 20 JunePhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festivals image of Esplanade Lamartine, Ville de Marcon, following the 2018 World Cup by @gaelfontany. '?? Champions! ??Esplanade Lamartine - Ville de M??con. Finale coupe du monde 2018.' - Posted 15 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of Benagil Cave, in Portugal, by @blu3willow. Posted 14th AugustPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Fashion image by @freyaaaart. 'Reinvention and freedom of expression in teenagers' - posted on 17 MayPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of a man at the beach in Nouvelle-Aquitaine by @olivierseni. Posted on 1 AugustPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festival image of punters at Newcastle Pride by @stevenbrunton. 'Such a fun image! Thanks for posing for the photo guys ' - Posted 23 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festival image of punters at Newcastle Pride by @stevenbrunton. 'Such a fun image! Thanks for posing for the photo guys ' - Posted 23 JulyhattiegladwellmetroPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festival image of punters at Newcastle Pride by @stevenbrunton. 'Such a fun image! Thanks for posing for the photo guys ' - Posted 23 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Animals & Pets image of Ted the Poodle in Gosforth, Newcastle, by @darrenwilliamhall. 'Super Ted' - Posted on 12 AugustPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Art/Culture & Style image by Adam Riley (@adampriley). ???England 2017??? ??? posted on May 4Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Sports image of rugby match in Newick by @mww2108. 'Match day ..... with mud ....' - Posted on 12 FebruaryPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of Niagra by @leedslassie. Posted on 6 March.Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted #NoFilter image of Regent Street by @andresson.photography. ???What a best way to finish your day photographing and you have this shot opportunity while you???re on the bus. Best bus ride ever.??? ??? posted on March 13Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Art/Culture & Style image of a man in a waiting room by @traverserlepaysage. 'A??roport international' - posted on 19 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Landscape image of lightning by @patlyr2052Photobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Family image of the Fiddler on the Roof cast at the Cardiff Open Air Theatre by @musotravels. 'Mothers meeting. Don???t be fooled, it???s raucous affair. A lot of love for these women!' - Posted on 28 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Landscape image of the Seven Sisters Cliffs by @mariacostantinaseri. Posted on 20 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted #Love image of a couple on the Paris Metro by @guilhphoto. 'Dans cette rame bond??e, ?? l'abri des regards indiscrets tels que le mien, ce couple profitait de son union sans pr??ter une seule attention ?? ce que pouvais penser le reste de la rame. En me penchant vers eux, les regards des parisiens m'ont foudroy?? et les mains se sont resserr??es devant moi, comme pour hurler de les laisser tranquille car bien que tout le monde ai pu constater leur profond baisers, personne n'a os?? y pr??ter un oeil par respect, respect qu'il m'a plu de briser.' - posted on 10 JunePhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Arts/Culture & Style image of a man reading in London by @gflandre. 'The reader. Learning to London' - Posted on 20 JunePhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Festivals image of Esplanade Lamartine, Ville de Marcon, following the 2018 World Cup by @gaelfontany. '?? Champions! ??Esplanade Lamartine - Ville de M??con. Finale coupe du monde 2018.' - Posted 15 JulyPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of Benagil Cave, in Portugal, by @blu3willow. Posted 14th AugustPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Fashion image by @freyaaaart. 'Reinvention and freedom of expression in teenagers' - posted on 17 MayPhotobox Instagram Photography Awards shortlisted Travel image of a man at the beach in Nouvelle-Aquitaine by @olivierseni. Posted on 1 August

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    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)

    When you think of Paris you think of the Eiffel Tower, fancy food, and designer shops.

    It’s not often we see an alternative side to thriving metropolises. But photographer David Tesinky has been picturing ailing poverty in some of the richest economies of the world.

    After snapping Japan’s slums in the bustling city of Osaka, he has taken to the French capital to show the plight of homeless people there.

    As the photographer from Prague, Czech Republic did in the Osaka slums, David immersed himself in the project, talking to displaced people about their situations.

    ‘I’ve been to Paris before and what I’ve seen is a quite big deal there. I am not saying that it’s a bigger deal than in other big cities but I just somehow personally felt attached to that,’ he told Metro.co.uk

    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)

    ‘I became a friend (at least temporarily) with most of them.

    ‘Some of them were captured on camera before we talked and one of them was not very happy, they came up to me and threw out my headphones. But it was the only case. Still, I felt the need to continue.’

    When asked about whether he felt emotional doing the shoots, he said it was difficult to take pictures without emotion. But he told Metro.co.uk he doesn’t want to share empty words of sympathy for his subjects.

    The most shocking moment for David was when he pictured a woman lying at the bus stop. She was cradling a baby and eventually let David come closer.

    ‘You can see she has a baby in the picture but you cannot really see the face,’ he added.

    You can see a child in another picture, next to a woman and man rolling up a cigarette.

    A few of the subjects looked straight at the camera while others went about their lives, reading, sleeping, talking.

    The images have resonated with many.

    One person commented on David’s images saying: ‘We were just there this summer. I could not get over the number of children on the streets.

    ‘In London, I saw lots of homeless people in the underground and on the streets, but in Paris, there were entire homeless refugee families everywhere, I mean, small children. It was disturbing.’

    Take a look at the powerful photos:

    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)
    David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance
    (Picture: David Tesinksky)

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    ??ivot, na, ulici, ulice, bezdomovec, bezdomovci, homeless, street, rodina, matka, otec, imigranti, imigrat, kontrast, francie, pa??????, paris, metropole, z??padn??, evropa, soci??ln??, probl??m, probl??my??ivot, na, ulici, ulice, bezdomovec, bezdomovci, homeless, street, rodina, matka, otec, imigranti, imigrat, kontrast, francie, pa??????, paris, metropole, z??padn??, evropa, soci??ln??, probl??m, probl??myfaimabakar1David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance??ivot, na, ulici, ulice, bezdomovec, bezdomovci, homeless, street, rodina, matka, otec, imigranti, imigrat, kontrast, francie, pa??????, paris, metropole, z??padn??, evropa, soci??ln??, probl??m, probl??my??ivot, na, ulici, ulice, bezdomovec, bezdomovci, homeless, street, rodina, matka, otec, imigranti, imigrat, kontrast, francie, pa??????, paris, metropole, z??padn??, evropa, soci??ln??, probl??m, probl??myfaimabakar1David Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romanceDavid Tesinksky, an independent photographer from Prague explores the subcultures and street stories of Paris to gain a different perspective and prove the city is not a fake romance

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    Primark Winnie The Pooh collection Provider: Instagram/primark.home
    (Picture: Primark/Instagram)

    Primark is launching a Winnie the Pooh collection and from what we’ve seen so far, it all looks lovely.

    The fashion retailer has shared two images from the collection to Instagram.

    First was a Winnie the Pooh themed teacup, a dainty china cup decorated with Pooh bear, and a golden trinket dish with Pooh’s face.

    The teacup costs £5 – and so does the dish.

    Instagram Photo

    So far, the photo has received 11,000 likes and lots of comments from excited customers – with most people agreeing that the collection looks super cute.

    Primark has also released a homeware range featuring our favourite childhood bear – which includes a black and white cushion covered in honeybees and a Winnie the Pooh bedding set/

    This post has already received 10,000 likes and over 400 comments.

    Instagram Photo

    One tagged their friend, writing: ‘We will be getting all of this to decorate ur room’.

    Another said: ‘Omg this is so cute!!’

    Someone else wrote: ‘THERE’S A FREAKING BEE CUSHION! aahhhhh’.

    We just hope there’ll be some stuff inspired by Eeyore and Piglet, too.

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    Primark Winnie The Pooh collectionPrimark Winnie The Pooh collectionhattiegladwellmetroPrimark Winnie The Pooh collection Provider: Instagram/primark.homePrimark Winnie The Pooh collectionPrimark Winnie The Pooh collectionhattiegladwellmetroPrimark Winnie The Pooh collection Provider: Instagram/primark.home

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    Undated handout photo issued by Cuprinol of George Smallwood celebrating in front of his Bee Eco Shed in Sheffield after it was crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: George Smallwood/PA)

    Remember when we gave you serious shed envy with the shortlist for the annual shed of the year competition?

    As impressive as entrants in the 2018 Shed of the Year competition were, the top prize went to an eco-friendly bee haven handmade by a firefighter.

    George Smallwood from Sheffield built a very impressive self-watering, self-sufficient home for vegetables, herbs, and insects.

    The firefighter has two beehives, a vegetable patch, a ‘bug house’ in his back garden and even a wildflower garden on the roof.

    George, 33, is now the proud owner of £1,000, a giant crown, a winner’s plaque, and £100 worth of garden woodwork. He said it all came as a welcome surprise.

    Undated handout file photo issued by Cuprinol of the Bee Eco Shed owned by George Smallwood in Sheffield, which has been crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: George Smallwood/PA)

    ‘We hope our shed will inspire others around the UK to create spaces for wildlife in their gardens,’ he said.

    ‘We’re so proud that our shed has become a habitat for nature in a small urban garden, showing you can always do your bit for making a home for nature.

    The judges who had a tough choice, considering the 3,000 entries and 16,000 public votes that came through.

    Some of George’s competitors included a taxi shed (yes, a real black cab) perfectly stuffed with a bed, an inn, a boat pod, a water shed (clever), homemade pubs, and contraptions that look like they’re out of a film.

    Undated handout photo issued by Cuprinol of George Smallwood celebrating in front of his Bee Eco Shed in Sheffield after it was crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: George Smallwood/PA)

    Competition founder Andrew Wilcox said: ‘The competition was extremely tough this year, from a musical shed on the water, to a taxi, to an authentic Irish pub.

    ‘George’s shed stood out due to its impressive, handmade structure but also because of its unique story and special purpose.’

    Why are bees important to humans?

    Bees pollinate 70 of the top 100 human food crops

    One single bee colony can pollinate 300 million flowers each day

    One in three bites of food we eat is derived from plants pollinated by bees

    Almonds are totally dependent on bee pollination. No bees, no almonds. Cucumbers, kiwis, and melon are majorly dependent on them

    Bee pollination helps to provide nourishing habits for animals like birds and other insects

    It’s clear why George took the top spot as the conservation of bees is extremely important to the survival of our planet.

    In fact, if all the bees were to die out, it’s estimated humans could survive for only four years.

    Unfortunately, the number of bees is dwindling at a dramatic pace – with an extinction rate of 10,000 species a year.

    And though London has lots of environmental problems such as over pollution, the capital has been good for bees, attracting urban species.

    So next time you see a bee, avoid getting stung but do appreciate their beauty. We need them.

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    Shed of the yearShed of the yearfaimabakar1Undated handout photo issued by Cuprinol of George Smallwood celebrating in front of his Bee Eco Shed in Sheffield after it was crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout file photo issued by Cuprinol of the Bee Eco Shed owned by George Smallwood in Sheffield, which has been crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by Cuprinol of George Smallwood celebrating in front of his Bee Eco Shed in Sheffield after it was crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Shed of the yearShed of the yearfaimabakar1Undated handout photo issued by Cuprinol of George Smallwood celebrating in front of his Bee Eco Shed in Sheffield after it was crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout file photo issued by Cuprinol of the Bee Eco Shed owned by George Smallwood in Sheffield, which has been crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by Cuprinol of George Smallwood celebrating in front of his Bee Eco Shed in Sheffield after it was crowned the 2018 Shed of the Year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday September 11, 2018. See PA story CONSUMER Shed. Photo credit should read: Cuprinol/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Can you imagine a world where no one eats meat?

    No peri-peri chicken, no cheeky 3am lamb doner kebab and certainly no topside of beef for a Sunday roast.

    According to a fifth of young adults, this could be a reality in the next 12 years.

    A study conducted by YouGov for the tech company ThoughtWorks questioned 2,000 people about how they expected shopping habits to change in future.

    One in five (18%) adults between the ages of 18 and 24 said that they thought people would have stopped eating meat completely by 2030.

    The number of vegans in the UK has certainly increased, with 7% of the population – 3.5 million people – forgoing all animal byproducts.

    According to the survey, three key issues will define how we shop for our food in the future; environmental awareness, ethics and health.

    The number one concern will be packaging, with 62% of people naming the reduction of packaging as the biggest issue for the future – even bigger than the price of food.

    An impressive 48% of those surveyed said that cutting down on food waste would be a top issue in years to come.

    Vegan meat alternatives mean that you don’t even have to forego that meaty taste anymore. (Picture: Getty)

    Results also showed that making better ethical choices when shopping is becoming a priority, with 32% of people saying that they would seek ‘assurance’ that their food was ethically sourced and from a sustainable supply chain.

    With one in four UK adults believed to be affected by obesity, health was an important issue for respondents.

    Tackling the obesity crisis was named as a top priority by 41% of people, while 38% said that the nutritional value of food would influence their purchasing decisions in the future and 30% predicted a greater interest in food as an intrinsic part of health and well being in the future.

    Whether we will become a world of vegans remains to be seen, but there’s certainly more interest in ethical eating and sustainable purchasing decisions than ever before.

    Dawn Carr, PETA’s Director of Vegan Corporate Projects, told Metro.co.uk: ‘These young people are savvy, and they’re on to something: the United Nations has stated that a global shift to a vegan diet is necessary to combat the worst effects of climate change.

    ‘And eating vegan is as easy as rhubarb pie –.Almost every high-street eatery now offers tasty vegan options, and supermarkets like Iceland and Waitrose are rushing to stock innovative plant-based products.

    ‘Perhaps it’s unlikely that humans will have entirely stopped eating animals by 2030, but we can certainly say that over the next decade, millions of cows, chickens, pigs, sheep, fish, and other animals will be spared pain, suffering, and slaughter because compassionate consumers are choosing to go vegan today.’

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    vegan-problems-01vegan-problems-01hpwilliamsonvegan-problems-01vegan-problems-01hpwilliamson

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    woman sleeping at desk
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Ah, university.

    A time for learning about the world, making friends, discovering your personal alcohol limits, pulling all-nighters and snoozing through your 2pm lecture.

    Actually, you might want to skip those all-nighters, as new research suggests that a lack of sleep has just as significant an impact on your performance at university as using alcohol or drugs.

    Researchers at the Center for College Sleep at the University of St. Thomas in Saint Paul, Minnesota, looked at 55,322 U.S. college students and found that each night of the week they had sleep problems was associated with a 0.02-point drop in their grade point average, and 10% higher odds that they would have to drop a course.

    Poor sleep was found to have the same impact on a student’s grade as binge-drinking, drug use, and being in an abusive relationship – so yes, that one all-nighter a week is serious.

    The students reported an average of 2.4 nights a week when they experienced difficulties with sleep, struggled to fall asleep, woke up exhausted, or felt tired throughout the day.

    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co,uk)

    Researchers noted that the effects of sleep on grades were strongest in first-year students, but still had an impact on those further along in their degree. The only factors that were seen to have a larger impact on academic success than sleep were learning disabilities and mental health issues.

    Study co-author J. Roxanne Prichard Told Reuters: ‘Someone who is routinely well rested has a 0.14 GPA advantage over someone perpetually sleepy.

    ‘When you’re approaching school work well rested, you can accomplish work and complex problem solving much more efficiently.

    ‘Complicating this, is that when you’re sleep deprived, you’re more likely to experience feelings of anxiety, depression, as well as physical illness, all of which can impair your effectiveness as a student.’

    Failing to get enough high quality sleep makes it hard to focus in lectures and take in material, as well as increasing levels of stress and increasing your likelihood of getting ill – meaning you might skip even more lessons.

    We all know that binge-drinking and doing drugs on the regular aren’t good ideas, but we tend to think of rubbish sleep as part of the quintessential university experience.

    This study suggests that perhaps it’s time for us to stop accepting exhaustion as the norm and ensure students know about how a good night’s sleep could help them succeed.

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    Why offices should give workers time and space to sleepWhy offices should give workers time and space to sleepellencscottmetro illustrationsWhy offices should give workers time and space to sleepWhy offices should give workers time and space to sleepellencscottmetro illustrations

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    Why we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to help (Picture: Ella Byworth/ Metro.co.uk) Metro Illustration Illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth/ Metro.co.uk)

    With Scotland poised to introduce a new bill than would ban smacking children, you might think that the worm is turning when it comes to punishing children in cruel ways.

    However, even without physical violence there are still plenty of ways to traumatise your children.

    Upcycling maven Kirstie Allsopp recently left Twitter after trying to defend her decision to smash her children’s iPads to curb their use of popular online game Fortnite.

    On the Jeremy Vine show the 47-year-old mother of two boys said: ‘In June I smashed my kids’ iPads, not in a violent way. I actually banged them on the table leg.

    ‘There is a game called Fortnite and another PUBG and I decided… we had made all sorts of rules and all sorts of times when we said you can’t play them and all those rules got broken and in the end I said “right that is it, I have to physically (break them)”.’

    People took exception to the cost of these piece of tech and the frivolity of simply smashing them (even if it was in a non-violent way).

    Kirstie responded that the iPads were only worth £140 and said ‘If I feel a valuable lesson was learned about following through then it was worth far, far more to our family.’

    Aside from the fact that £140 is a lot of money to the vast majority of families in the UK, there are quite a few ways that lesson could have been learned without damaging possessions.

    Could she have enforced screen time restrictions in a less dramatic way? Could she have installed a timer on the devices to shut off after a certain limit? Could she have even donated the iPads to a charity shop so someone else could get some use out of them?

    No matter how good the eventual lessons to be learned are, this ‘solution’ sends a message to children that items are inherently disposable and you can destroy them to get what you want.

    Child behaviour expert Richard David Curtis told Metro.co.uk: ‘Repetitively associating violent acts with not getting your own way can teach children a link between the two.

    ‘Even as a one-off it is quite extreme, how would Kirstie have acted if one of her children did that to her phone because she was too busy to do something with them?’

    Curtis says that there are far easier and less worrying measures you can take to curb kids’ time online.

    ‘It is far more appropriate to restrict access or take it away for a finite period of time,’ he explains. ‘This way, children learn to respect the boundary.

    ‘The risk is with using a large sanction like destroying it or giving it away to someone else, is that rather than teach children about respect, it teaches them to be devious and hide their use of the game.’

    Kirstie compared the iPads to cigarettes saying, ‘If you found your kids with a packet of cigarettes would you say “I won’t destroy these because they are worth a tenner but please don’t smoke?” No, of course you wouldn’t.’

    That analogy already doesn’t work because iPads aren’t cigarettes (obviously) but even if they were equivalent, the point is that the lesson doesn’t come from the destruction of the cigarettes; it comes from talking to your children about why smoking is bad and why you don’t want them to smoke.

    A study by Stanford University in 2011 found that children who saw their parents behaving in an aggressive manner towards a doll behaved more aggressively themselves.

    The main takeaway from scientist Albert Bandura was that it’s very much not ‘do as I say’ but ‘do as I do’ when kids are growing up and learning how to interact with others.

    Allsopp’s children are 10 and 12, meaning they likely already have that framework in place, but if they’re being taught that breaking things is how to get what you want, that shows them this way of acting is not just okay, but works.

    Kirstie is a principled parent – she took flak recently for revealing she sits business class on planes while her children fly coach to teach them ‘the value of money’ – but this particular principle might need to be reconsidered.

    MORE: Is it okay to watch adult TV on public transport if you’re sitting near a child?

    MORE: I feel like my fertility issues are forcing me to have a child before I am ready


    Why we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to helpWhy we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to helpjessicacvlWhy we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to help (Picture: Ella Byworth/ Metro.co.uk) Metro Illustration IllustrationsWhy we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to helpWhy we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to helpjessicacvlWhy we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to help (Picture: Ella Byworth/ Metro.co.uk) Metro Illustration Illustrations

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    BEAUTY BAY launching own vegan-friendly and cruelty free cosmetics brand
    (Picture: BEAUTY BAY)

    If you’re a beauty obsessive you’ll be thrilled to hear that online retailer BEAUTY BAY have developed their own range of cosmetics.

    Kicking off with an eyeshadow palette collection aptly named Colour Theory, the new products will be available exclusively on beautybay.com from 13 September 12pm BST.

    Developed and curated by the BEAUTY BAY team, the new 42-shade colour palettes offer endless mix-and-match possibilities.

    In other words, if you’re a sucker for eyeshadow palettes and love gorgeous colours, these palettes are perfect for your peepers.

    Instagram Photo

    The BEAUTY BAY Colour Theory collection includes three eyeshadow palettes named Origin, Evolve and Identify. And they aren’t for minimalist makeup wearers as they feature plenty of shades and finishes to play with.

    Unlike other large eyeshadow palettes, each Colour Theory palette contains step-by-step looks. All you need to do is follow the simple vertical tutorials to build an eye look in six stages: base, transition, crease, liner, pop and highlight.

    This genius layout means you won’t only end up using one of the shades, as they all work seamlessly together.

    In terms of formulation, BEAUTY BAY promises intense pigmentation, minimal fallout, AND buttery texture.

    Instagram Photo

    Even better? The palettes cost £25 each, making them pretty affordable. And they’re vegan and cruelty-free – hooray!

    Our favourite palette of the three is Origin, which contains an abundance of warm, neutral shades for casual and daytime looks.

    But if you’re over neutrals, BEAUTY BAY have thrown a bright palette in the mix named Identity, that contains anything but boring shades.

    The Colour Theory palettes will be available exclusively on beautybay.com.


    0918_COLOURTHEORY_PALLETORIGIN2_JS_RT-6cab0918_COLOURTHEORY_PALLETORIGIN2_JS_RT-6cabemilyknott17BEAUTY BAY launching own vegan-friendly and cruelty free cosmetics brand0918_COLOURTHEORY_PALLETORIGIN2_JS_RT-6cab0918_COLOURTHEORY_PALLETORIGIN2_JS_RT-6cabemilyknott17BEAUTY BAY launching own vegan-friendly and cruelty free cosmetics brand

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    (Picture: Sara Meddings/BPM MEDIA)

    When doctors told Sara Meddings her breast cancer was terminal, she decided to make the most of the time she had left with her children.

    The 42-year-old was told she shouldn’t plan for more than three months ahead, so knew she needed to prepare her children for life without her.

    She decided to create a bucket list of things to do with her children and write letters for them to read at pivotal moments in their lives.

    ‘I’m getting used to living day by day but it’s really difficult, trying to believe that you may not be here in a year or 18 months,’ said Sara. ‘You cannot get your head around it.’

    Sara was diagnosed with breast cancer in May 2015. After rounds of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as well as a lumpectomy, she was given the all clear in April 2016, but in November of that year doctors found a secondary tumour in her lymph nodes.

    Since the discovery of that tumour, Sara has had 30 cycles of chemotherapy and so much radiotherapy that she’s not allowed to have any more. Her cancer has been deemed incurable, meaning she’s had to get used to the likelihood of not being around for her children, Callum, 11, and Georgia, 15, in the coming years.

    Sara Meddings from Bromsgrove, who has terminal cancer, is going to write memory cards and books for her children to read after she has gone
    (Picture: Birmingham Mail)

    To prepare her children for the loss of their mum, she’s been ticking off things she’s always wanted to do on her bucket list, and has written letters for the children to read when they’re older.

    Sara has made Callum and Georgia memory books which contain cards for their 18th and 21st birthdays as well as letters imparting lessons she’s keen for her children to learn.

    ‘I will give them to my sister so that she can give them to them at the right time,’ Sara explains.

    ‘In the books, I’m writing things I want them to know. I want them to be kind to people, enjoy life, follow their dreams and do what they want to do.

    ‘I’m writing the things that are really important, things I would be saying to them if I was alive.

    ‘I won’t be here in person so I’ll share them with them through my books.

    ‘Also, I’m adding special photos so they’ll be able to look through and say do you remember when we did that?

    ‘It’s so that during the sad times, they’ll be able to remember the good times too.’

    Sara Medding's cancer journey
    (Picture: Sara Meddings/BPM MEDIA)

    Sara is now suffering from lymphedema, which has caused her arm to swell to twice its normal size with 4lbs of extra fluid. But she refuses to let the pain hold her back from making memories with her children before she goes.

    She’s been making her way through a bucket list, having already taken her children on a cruise around the Greek Islands, been for a fancy meal at Purnell’s, taken a first class train to London, drank cocktails up the Shard, and had champagne in a hot tub.

    Next on the list, Sara wants to take the children swimming with dolphins in Turkey.

    The mum hopes that by sharing her story, she’ll raise awareness of the impact of cancer on families.

    Sara Medding's cancer journey
    (Picture:  Sara Meddings/BPM MEDIA

    ‘It doesn’t matter how old you are,’ said Sara. ‘People think about cancer and they think you just go in for chemo but there’s so much more to it than that.

    ‘Cancer affects everyone in your family.

    ‘You come home with a bag full of medicines to take. Sometimes you miss things. I just managed to come out for Mother’s Day but we’d booked tickets for Crufts and I was in hospital so I couldn’t make it.

    ‘You have to make a lot of sacrifices that affect other people.

    ‘It changes your appearance, you get upset when you look in the mirror and see your face is swollen and your eyes are puffed up and your eyelashes are sparse. I wear a cold cap during chemo so I haven’t lost my hair.

    ‘My oncologist said he’d never met anyone more brave. I asked why and he said it was because of my age and the fact that I wanted to know exactly what was going to happen. He said a lot of people don’t want to know.

    ‘I prefer to know.’

    Sara's advice to those with cancer:

    • Don’t take life for granted
    • Enjoy every moment
    • Try not to be scared by your diagnosis
    • Get info and speak to people
    • Keep lines of communication open
    • Let people help because they want to

    MORE: Teaching children to destroy possessions to get what they want ‘doesn’t work’

    MORE: Is it okay to watch adult TV on public transport if you’re sitting near a child?

    MORE: Coca-Cola launches pink cans of Diet Coke for Breast Cancer Awareness Month


    A brave mum has written a series of poignant cards, letters and messages to leave for her children after she has goneA brave mum has written a series of poignant cards, letters and messages to leave for her children after she has goneellencscottSara Meddings from Bromsgrove, who has terminal cancer, is going to write memory cards and books for her children to read after she has goneSara Medding's cancer journeySara Medding's cancer journeyA brave mum has written a series of poignant cards, letters and messages to leave for her children after she has goneA brave mum has written a series of poignant cards, letters and messages to leave for her children after she has goneellencscottSara Meddings from Bromsgrove, who has terminal cancer, is going to write memory cards and books for her children to read after she has goneSara Medding's cancer journeySara Medding's cancer journey

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    NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 07: Devon Windsor attends Harper's BAZAAR ICONS at The Plaza Hotel on September 7, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/WireImage)
    (Picture: Steven Ferdman)

    American model Devon Windsor has provoked anger with what Twitter users have dubbed ‘ignorant and tone-deaf’ comments about race and diversity in modelling.

    On E!’s new documentary series Model Squad, where nine women are followed through New York Fashion Week, Windsor is filmed talking about her experiences in the industry with fellow models Daniela Braga, Olivia Culpo, Hannah Ferguson, Ping Hue, Nadine Leopold, Caroline Lowe, Ashley Moore, and Shanina Shaik.

    In the clip, four models (Braga, Moore, Shaik and Hue) speak openly about how difficult it can be to navigate the world of fashion as a person of colour.

    White model Olivia Culpo asks them: ‘What are you guys talking about?’

    Ping Hue responds by simply saying: ‘Diversity’, while Shanina Shaik tells the group about suffering bullying because of the colour of her skin, and the humiliation of being told that she’d never be able to book high fashion jobs.

    Shaik says: ‘A lot of Black girls would have to miss Milan because we wouldn’t be able to walk in the shows because [designers] didn’t want girls that color.’

    Instagram Photo

    The discussion was frank, honest and raised important questions about the continued marginalisation of non-white models.

    Then Devon Windsor weighed in.

    Windsor said that she could relate to Shaik’s experiences because she’d had to live abroad for months at a time.

    ‘I literally fucking went through hell and literally lived in different countries like every other month and didn’t speak that language.

    ‘I didn’t speak Paris, didn’t speak Italian. And I did that for like, two years.’

    When challenged, Windsor attempted to defend her position by comparing her difficulties having blonde hair to the struggles that women of colour face.

    ‘You know how hard it is to be blonde? I have to get a highlight every month! Do you know how expensive that is?’

    Unsurprisingly, viewers were less than impressed by Windsor’s attempt to equate her experience of being a white, blonde model with that of a women of colour facing racial prejudices in an industry not famed for its diversity or inclusivity.

    Twitter users described Windsor’s comments as ‘trash’ and asked the model to ‘stop embarrassing yourself’.

    One tweet on the controversy read: ‘Let’s all applaud devon windsor for her bravery, invalidating the struggles models of color & sharing the stories of her struggles as a blonde white girl in the modeling industry must’ve taken so much courage. I love when models use their platform for activism. it’s amazing.’

    In response to the backlash, Windsor posted an apology on Twitter.

    She wrote: ‘It goes without saying, that the comments in the show are incredibly insensitive.

    ‘The majority of the conversation was edited and if a peer of mine wanted to discuss such a serious subject, I would never follow it with a joke.’

    However, her apology was not well-received, particularly after Windsor had liked tweets that seemed to excuse her comments and paint her as the victim of an angry online mob.

    Some users expressed concern that the apology was written by someone working for Windsor, as her comments about not being able to ‘speak Paris’ didn’t seem congruent with the language used in the statement.

    Others simply weren’t impressed, with one user tweeting: ‘This is so vague and tacky… I would say that you’re cancelled but you weren’t even a thing in the first place.’

    Two days after posting her apology, Windsor also tweeted: ‘I can’t wait until you all see episode 6, where the truth really comes out!!!!’, perhaps suggesting that she doesn’t believes that she was misrepresented.

    Windsor’s comments have been compared to Kendall Jenner’s unwelcome remarks about being able to be more picky about the modelling jobs she takes than other girls in the industry.

    Fellow E! star Olivia Culpo defended Windsor and suggested that her remarks were taken out of context.

    She wrote on Twitter: ‘I can assure you Dev has an immensely kind heart and anything that portrays otherwise is a manipulation of her true character.’

    However, Hue’s response to Windsor’s comments is indicative of their nature, whatever the impact of the editing process.

    She faced down Windsor’s ignorance with: ‘Oh my God, tiny violin’.

    Representatives for Devon Windsor had not responded to requests for comment at the time of publication. 

    MORE: French model Thylane Blondeau, once called the ‘most beautiful girl in the world’, is launching her own clothing line

    MORE: Dolls Kill’s ‘Lolita’ collection criticised for sexualizing children


    Harper's BAZAAR ICONSHarper's BAZAAR ICONShpwilliamsonNEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 07: Devon Windsor attends Harper's BAZAAR ICONS at The Plaza Hotel on September 7, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/WireImage)Harper's BAZAAR ICONSHarper's BAZAAR ICONShpwilliamsonNEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 07: Devon Windsor attends Harper's BAZAAR ICONS at The Plaza Hotel on September 7, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/WireImage)

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Nineties nostalgia is hitting us hard.

    We long for the simpler pre-Twitter days, think fondly of our gone but not forgotten Tamagotchi, and continue to mourn the loss of turkey twizzlers on school lunch menus.

    That emotional return to the 90s applies to the names we’re choosing for our offspring, too, according to a survey by Mumsnet.

    The parenting site reveals that baby names popular in the 1990s are making a comeback, from the return of James – the second most popular boy’s name in 1994, now the 12th most popular – to a resurgence of Charlotte – number four in 1994, now number 12.

    A few of the nineties names that are increasing in popularity are Daniel, Emma, Samuel, Luke, and Hannah.

    Those might all just seem like standard, classic names, but they were all especially popular in the nineties, and are now climbing their way back to the top of baby name lists in 2018.

    Baby names from further back in time, however, aren’t proving as popular.

    Mumsnet’s research found that the top ten girls’ names from 1964, including Susan, Jacqueline, and Deborah, remain unpopular. The most popular name on the list is Helen, but only 23% of those surveyed said they liked that name.

    (Picture: Getty)

    Some names from 1964 are dying out completely, with Diane liked by just 8% of respondents, while Tracey and Sharon, in sixth and tenth place in 1964 respectively, were liked by just 3% of those surveyed.

    Of all the girls’ names from 1994 and 1964, respondents said they’d be least likely to name their baby girl Sharon or Tracey, and ONS shows that in 2016 there were just six babies named Tracey and 30 named Sharon.

    Sorry, Tracey and Sharon. But hey, at least if you are keen on those names, they’re not going to be super common.

    Mumsnet Founder Justine Roberts, said: ‘Naming trends tend to go in cycles, but it’s taken 80 years or so for Ivy, Mabel and Noah to become popular again, so it’s interesting to see nineties names coming back so quickly.

    ‘Given the current resurgence in wedge trainers and ‘classic’ mobile phones, all that remains is to put Parklife into your CD Walkman and dig out your MySpace log-in.’

    We wouldn’t go that far, but if you are pondering what to call your child, it’s worth looking back in time at popular names from twenty years ago. A nostalgic name is so on trend right now.

    MORE: Mum with terminal breast cancer writes letters for her kids to read after she’s gone

    MORE: London’s first floating wine festival is coming to get you tipsy on the Thames

    MORE: People are enjoying ASOS’s Bananas in Pyjamas inspired styling


    Happy baby in bear costumeHappy baby in bear costumeellencscottHappy baby in bear costumeHappy baby in bear costumeellencscott

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    Instagram Photo

    Cellulite.

    Curse of the swimsuit, ruiner of booty short, or so we’re told.

    Clothing company Outdoor Voices have caused a stir by including a pretty modest little patch of it in an advert for a pair of their running shorts.

    The picture, of student and model Julia-Elise Childs, accompanies a review by another customer and shows some cellulite on her upper thigh.

    The Instagram post has gathered almost 14,000 likes and many rave reviews from women praising the brand for ‘real and honest marketing’.

    What seemed to appeal to many of them was the fact that the photograph was used without any explicit attention being drawn to the cellulite’s presence.

    Instagram Photo

    ‘I thought this post was gonna be one of those “love yourself because we all have imperfections”. Nope. Actual realness. LOVE THIS. Will buy something when I can.’ said user @amyrobbins.27.

    Perhaps some women have grown tired of brands using body positivity as a gimmick to sell products to customers. It feels more authentic when they simply include the unaltered pics as though they’re normal – which, of course they are.

    A vast majority of women will have cellulite somewhere on their body – estimates range between 80% and 93% – compared to a much smaller number of men.

    Instagram Photo

    Why? It seems we have good old Mother Nature to thank for that.

    Cellulite is caused by the connective tissue that separates fat beneath the skin. For some women, this tissue is shaped like honeycomb, which makes the skin appear dimpled.

    Women have cellulite thanks to hormones.

    But why are we so obsessed with banishing cellulite? Why has there been a perennial market for ice scrubs and extravagant peels to rid us of what should surely, by now, be a pretty standard sight?

    Of course there is always a market for selling women hatred of their own bodies, but cellulite seems so common, so universal, affecting just about every body type, that surely it shouldn’t be remarkable to see it in a photograph.

    There’s been a backlash in recent times against the accepted wisdom that cellulite is to be burned off if possible and kept cloaked if not.

    Body positive bloggers of all shapes and sizes have posted ‘unflattering’ photos of themselves in poses which show the reality behind often highly-stylised Instagram posts.

    Plus size blogger and activist Callie Thorpe has been open about the abuse she’s received as a result of doing so .

    Instagram Photo

    Megan Jayne Crabbe, who blogs as BodyPosiPanda, went viral after showing two pictures taken simultaneously.

    In one, Crabbe, who is on the smaller scale of plus-size blogging, poses flatteringly in a way that highlights her curves but flattens her stomach.

    In the other, she sits naturally and we can see the rolls and cellulite which can be posed or edited away.

    Instagram Photo

    Here’s hoping more companies follow the lead of Outdoor Voices and include the little imperfections that make us human – and make us feel seen when they’re included without a big song and dance.

    MORE: Bloggers and Instagrammers explain why their jobs deserve some respect

    MORE: Lingerie campaign latest to ban airbrushing and celebrate models of all sizes


    Outdoor Voices praised for showing celluliteOutdoor Voices praised for showing cellulitemeganbnolanOutdoor Voices praised for showing celluliteOutdoor Voices praised for showing cellulitemeganbnolan

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    Amelie and Paul O’Grady (Photo: Tom Dymond)

    My mum says I didn’t sleep well when I was a baby, no matter how many cuddles she gave me. No matter how many times she walked me around the block, or times she fed me, I just didn’t settle.

    She says she now thinks that was the first signs of the disease I have been living with all my life.

    People think that arthritis affects only old people and they can be really dismissive when I tell then I have a disease they normally think only their granny gets.

    The type of arthritis I have, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, affects about 12,000 children in the UK and it can be much more aggressive than arthritis in adults.

    It causes lots of pain and inflammation in my joints, mostly in my hips and knees and causes my joints to stiffen.

    Because it is so rare it can be really difficult to treat. This year I have spent a lot of my time at Great Ormond Street Hospital. Lots of people are working to treat me, keep my pain levels under control and help me be mobile.

    I have had to take a lot of drugs to help manage my condition and the ones I have taken have sometimes made me feel really sick and tired, which has meant I haven’t been able to go to school, or even help mum walk Buster, our very lively pet dog.

    The pain I have been in has meant I have missed my friends’ birthday parties and haven’t been able to play and hang out with them.

    Things that many 13-year-olds do really easily I have not been able to do – it’s been hard.

    Amelie and her mum (Picture: GOSH)

    When I have been in pain or feeling ill my mum tells me how proud she is because I am so brave, but I’m not really. In some ways I don’t really have a choice and it’s just something that I have to live with.

    My condition gets progressively worse year on year. One of my hands is smaller, as is one of my feet. One of my legs is shorter and my joints are really swollen, especially my ankle. Walking has become really difficult and over the last six months I have spent a lot of the time using a wheelchair.

    I‘ve had to miss a loads of school for months of treatment but I’ve learned so much by being in hospital.

    While I have had lessons in hospital, I’ve learnt the most from all the other incredible children I have met, who I know I’ll always stay friend with.

    Even in my hardest moments I’ve been so well looked after. I’ve not only been given the ability to walk again but I’ve had so many hours of happiness and laughs with everyone here.

    I have had heaps of physio to help and this summer I had some surgery on my ankle. Since then, I’ve had physio every day and am constantly working to help rebuild my strength.

    Although it has been really tiring and at times painful, it is beginning to work. I have stopped using my wheelchair to get everywhere and I am starting to help mum with Buster.

    I hope this September I can go back to school and be with my friends, like every other 13-year-old, but I’ll never forget the magical time and people my mum and I have shared our journey with.

    I can’t wait to tell everyone my wonderful stories about the hospital and show off my new walk!

    This autumn I even hope to take part a 5k fun run for the charity – I’d love to be able to give something back to those who helped me. I might not be able to run all the way round but if I can just get round it with Buster by my side I will be really happy!

    Amelie took part in Paul O’Grady’s Little Heroes. You can catch up on the ITV Hub now. 

    MORE: Nothing will prepare you for when your child finishes their cancer treatment

    MORE: My daughter’s death saved four lives: I am so glad we found the time to talk about organ donation

    MORE: My husband donated his organs to save lives and I hope others will do the same


    GOSH patient Amelie Shaikh with Paul O'Grady and a therapy dog, during the filming of Paul O'Grady's Little Heroes_LR-5be8GOSH patient Amelie Shaikh with Paul O'Grady and a therapy dog, during the filming of Paul O'Grady's Little Heroes_LR-5be8jessrubyaustinGOSH patient Amelie Shaikh with Paul O'Grady and a therapy dog, during the filming of Paul O'Grady's Little Heroes_LR-5be8GOSH patient Amelie Shaikh with Paul O'Grady and a therapy dog, during the filming of Paul O'Grady's Little Heroes_LR-5be8jessrubyaustin

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