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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

older | 1 | .... | 1421 | 1422 | (Page 1423) | 1424 | 1425 | .... | 1850 | newer

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    (Picture: Primark)

    If you’ve ever wanted to get your hands on those Christmas jumpers lovingly made by Ron Weasley’s mum, Molly, now’s your chance.

    Okay, so Molly Weasley isn’t going to knit you one of those oversized, ugly jumpers specially for you. But Primark will help you out.

    The fashion retailer has just started selling jumpers which come with the H and R initials on them – just like the ones Ron’s mum made for Ron and Harry.

    (Picture: Primark)

    The jumpers come as part of Primark’s Harry Potter range, and are available in red or dark blue with the initial knitted in gold.

    So while you won’t be going from muggle to wizard this Christmas, at least you’ll feel like part of the Hogwarts family.

    (Picture: Primark)

    If you want to find out which house you would be sorted to if you were accepted into the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, an Etsy seller has created some sorting hat candles.

    The white, vanilla scented candles change colour once their burned, revealing either red, yellow, green or blue – all of the house colours. They also each reveal a different scent once they start to melt.

    (Picture: Etsy)

    The candles have a glittery layer on top and cost £8.95.

    The product description reads: ‘The sorting candle! Find out what house you belong in with the sorting candle – light this lushus scented candle to burn away a cream top layer with silver glitter and a light vanilla scent and reveal one of four house colours to find where you have been sorted to!

    ‘Will reveal one of four colours red, blue, green or yellow and each house has a special themed scent that will emerge as the vanilla layer has melted.

    ‘A perfect bookish gift for any book lover or a great stocking stuffer for any movie fan and candle lover!

    MORE: Primark’s sparkly Minnie Mouse heels are finally back in stores

    MORE: Fenty’s Chill Owt line and Mac’s Shiny, Pretty Things collection prove Christmas is near


    You can buy Ron and Harry's Christmas jumpers from Primark this yearYou can buy Ron and Harry's Christmas jumpers from Primark this yearhattiegladwellmetroYou can buy Ron and Harry's Christmas jumpers from Primark this yearYou can buy Ron and Harry's Christmas jumpers from Primark this yearhattiegladwellmetro

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    The new bagel is doughier and more realistic (Picture: Apple)

    No bagel is complete without a healthy slathering of cream cheese, and clearly Apple agrees.

    The tech giant have updated their bagel emoji, which was formally a plain, sliced bagel, to one with a doughier consistency and a thick layer of cream cheese. Just how we like them.

    The design tweak comes following an onslaught of complaints and outraged comments from Apple users who thought the original image was an offence to bagel-lovers everywhere.

    Bagel-lovers, particularly New Yorkers, hit out at the sad-looking snack, saying the design looked ‘fake’, ‘frozen’ and ‘stale’.

    (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

    And if you think that no one has the time or the inclination to study their emoji in that much detail, then you’d be wrong.

    Kelly Owens said on Twitter: ‘Because what kind of animal doesn’t use Philadelphia cream cheese on every bagel, ever?!’

    Another Twitter user added: ‘Wow vile I’ve never eaten a bagel without cream cheese on it because I’m not a monster.’

    But others were less than impressed at the widespread outrage, and thought there were bigger issues for Apple to focus on.

    ‘Okay so Apple can make changes to a bagel emoji when there are complaints but won’t make stronger chargers and earphones when there are complaints,’ said Jae.

    Liam King was particularly peeved about the update as a ginger, ‘So we’re getting f*cking cream cheese on the bagel emoji but yet we’ve still not got ginger emojis. The world’s against us.’

    The new emoji is part of Apple’s release of iOS 12.1, and should hopefully pacify the hardcore bagel enthusiasts – apparently there are a lot of them out there.

    MORE: A closer look at the Apple ‘iPlane’ that Kanye pitched to Trump

    MORE: iPhone XR release date and price: when you can get Apple’s ‘affordable’ new phone

    MORE: OnePlus 6T will launch on EE and Vodafone as well as O2 next month


    Apple added cream cheese to its bagel emoji after receiving complaintsApple added cream cheese to its bagel emoji after receiving complaintsnataliemorris88Apple added cream cheese to its bagel emoji after receiving complaintsApple added cream cheese to its bagel emoji after receiving complaintsnataliemorris88

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    A YEAR OF GREAT SEX BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA VAULT
    (Picture: Cult Beauty)

    If you’re a lover of Too Faced’s Better Than Sex mascara, their Christmas collection for 2018 will give you feelings you didn’t know you had.

    The collection includes a Gingerbread Spice Eye Shadow Palette, Limited Edition Beauty Cracker and a ‘A Year of Great Sex’, a vault containing a year’s supply of their iconic Better Than Sex Mascara.

    thumbnail for post ID 8044140Arsene Wenger to make Tottenham's top transfer target his first signing for PSG

    Meaning you can treat yourself, or someone else, to great sex all year round.

    Anyone else screaming for joy?

    (Picture: Cult Beauty)

    We admit Too Faced’s Better Than Sex Mascara might not be better than sex per se, but it’s not far off.

    Thanks to it’s inky-black, long lasting formula, hourglass wand and full volumising finish, it’s gained legions of loyal buyers, making it the best-selling prestige mascara in the U.S.

    So it will come as no surprise the vault (£55) will make a great Christmas gift for any beauty obsessive.

    (Picture: Cult Beauty)

    The pink limited edition vault, rolls out to reveal five tubes of Better Than Sex Mascara, labelled by month so you know when to bin your mascara and open a fresh wand.

    You might be wondering why the vault doesn’t house 12 mascaras in total. But as a rule of thumb, mascara should be replaced roughly every two to three months. Because when mascara dries out, or gets clumpy, it becomes a breeding ground for bacteria – ew.

    And the fifth tube is simply ‘bonus sex’ and we’re not complaining.

    A single tube of Better Than Sex mascara costs £19, so five tubes would cost an eye-watering £95.

    So the Too Faced A Year of Great Sex Mascara Vault will save you a whopping £40.

    The Too Faced A Year of Great Sex Mascara Vault is available online now.

    MORE: Girl brought cookies to school baked with her grandmother’s ashes

    MORE: How does vegan keto work?


    A YEAR OF GREAT SEX BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA VAULT-d660A YEAR OF GREAT SEX BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA VAULT-d660emilyknott17A YEAR OF GREAT SEX BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA VAULTA YEAR OF GREAT SEX BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA VAULT-d660A YEAR OF GREAT SEX BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA VAULT-d660emilyknott17A YEAR OF GREAT SEX BETTER THAN SEX MASCARA VAULT

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    Caption: Argos reveals its bestselling toys from the last 45 years

    The best part of Christmas as a child (apart from the family togetherness and love, obviously) was getting the Argos catalogue and circling what you wanted from Santa.

    Not sure why we thought Santa would nip down to Brent Cross shopping centre, take a ticket, and stock up on Polly Pockets before getting in a sleigh, but there we are.

    The iconic retailer have recently released their top toys of the last 45 years, making us seriously nostalgic for the days when our greatest resp

    You can tell the credit crunch hit in 2008, as sales go from expensive games consoles to teddy bears.

    Also, we’re not sure about 2001’s children, who inexplicably wanted to play Chris Tarrant and got av Who Wants to be a Millionaire boardgame in their stocking.

    Check out the full list.

    Argos' bestsellers year on year

    1973 – Shrinky Dinks

    1974 – Risk board game

    1975 – Othello boardgame

    1976 – Stretch Armstrong

    1977 – Star Wars toys, including figurines of Luke, Darth & R2D2

    1978 – Dungeons & Dragons

    1979 – Strawberry Shortcake

    1980 – Hungry Hippos board game

    1981 – Rubik’s Cube

    1982 – Lego train set – Lego 255 basic train set

    1983 – Strawberry Shortcake 5” Scented Doll in mint

    1984 – Cabbage patch dolls 

    1985 – Transformers City Commander Ultra Magnus

    1986 – Lazer tag 

    1987 – Sylvanian Families – the grow bear family

    1988 – Ghostbusters Proton Park 

    1989 – Optimus Prime – Transformers Evolution Optimus Prime 2 Pack

    1990 – Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles action figures 

    1991 – Gameboy

    1992 – Barbie, weekend Barbie with denim outfit

    Copyright: ? Mattel, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    1993 – Thunderbrirds Tracey Island

    1994 – Power Rangers Action Figures

    1995 – POGs

    1996 – Toy Story Buzz Lightyear Action Figure

    1997 – Tamigotchi blue and pink model

    1998 – Teksta the dog 

    1999 – Bob the Builder

    2000 – Furby

    2001 – Who Wants to be a Millionaire board game

    2002 – Bratz Dolls – Jade and Cloe

    2003 – Beyblades

    2004 – Robosapiens

    2005 – BMX Bike

    2006 – Xbox 360

    2007 – Nintento Wii

    2008 – In the Night Garden Iggle Piggle 

    2009 – Disney High School Musical 3 Dance Mat (Playstation II)

    2010 – Zhu Zhu/Go Go Pet Hamsters

    2011 – Leapfrog LeapPad Explore Tablet/Electronic Test Tube

    2012 – Skylanders Giants/Nerf Gun

    2013 – Furby Boom

    2014 – Frozen snow globe

    2015 – Barbie Saddle n Ride/Star Wars The Force Awakens Kylo Ren Deluxe Electronic Light Sabre/Pie Face

    2016 – Hatchimals purple egg

    2017 – Cozmo white robot

    MORE: Mums offer advice to the Duchess of Sussex following royal baby news

    MORE: Dads campaign for baby changing tables in men’s toilets


    Argos reveals its bestselling toys from the last 45 yearsArgos reveals its bestselling toys from the last 45 yearsjessicacvlArgos reveals its bestselling toys from the last 45 yearsArgos reveals its bestselling toys from the last 45 yearsjessicacvl

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    Doreen and Sheila (Picture: Julie Robinson)
    Doreen and Sheila (Picture: Julie Robinson)

    Making new friends can be hard at any age.

    But it’s particularly difficult in your later years.

    When your family has grown up and perhaps your partner has passed away, life can get very lonely.

    That is why Theresa May has announced an extra £1.8 million for community projects, to allow GPs to prescribe social activities rather than pills to tackle loneliness.

    Loneliness is one of the greatest public health challenges of our time, Mrs May said, and is linked to illnesses including heart disease, strokes and Alzheimer’s disease.

    About 200,000 older people have not had a conversation with a friend or relative in more than a month and three-quarters of GPs said they see up to five people every day suffering loneliness.

    According to Age UK, more than 2 million people over 50 will be lonely by 2025-26 – a 49% increase on the 1.36 million in 2015-16.

    But across the UK, there are already groups where older people can meet and take part in activities together.

    TOPSHOT - Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May reacts as she talks with people attending a social group in Vauxhall, south London, on October 15, 2018, where she launched the government's loneliness strategy. (Photo by Stefan Rousseau / POOL / AFP)STEFAN ROUSSEAU/AFP/Getty Images
    Theresa May reacts as she talks with people attending a social group in Vauxhall (Picture: Stefan Rousseau)

    Thanks to these groups those who are retired can make friends with new people who share the same interests.

    Sheila Seaboune, 81, and Doreen Diddle, 80, met at an exercise class in Sutton Coldfield about 18 months ago.

    ‘We hit it off quickly,’ Doreen tells Metro.co.uk. ‘We enjoy meeting up every week and we often stay after class for a natter. I don’t get lonely because I always have people to see and things to do.’

    Every week, the pair get together with around 24 other people mostly over the age of 60 at the Move It or Lose It class in Sutton Coldfield.

    They take part in activities including aerobics and movement exercises, which have been developed for older people of all abilities.

    Doreen explains: ‘We do some of them sitting down and then those of those that can stand up. We’re both quite lucky that we are still in good shape for our age. It’s important for us to get exercise and keep healthy.’

    Outside the class, Shelia, Doreen and their classmates keep in touch with each other over the phone.

    Sheila said: ‘We do like to check in if someone can’t make it or if they haven’t been well so it is a really nice group.’

    Both women had other hobbies outside of the class that they say help to keep them busy – something they believe is vital to combating loneliness.

    About 200,000 older people have not had a conversation with a friend or relative in more than a month

    Doreen’s family live far away and although she speaks to them regularly on the phone, her hobbies mean that she is able to get out and see people as much as possible.

    She says: ‘It’s not hard to make friends when you are older but you do have to get our there. I enjoy dress making and going to the Women’s Institute. My family are not close by so my interests mean I have plenty of people to talk to.

    Sheila adds: ‘My daughter lives nearby but she is busy and we don’t see each other every day. I enjoy this as well as walking groups so it means I can stay active and socialise.’

    Move it or Lose it!  was founded in 2010 by award-winning exercise instructor, Julie Robinson.

    Julie has always been passionate about improving fitness for older people.

    Loneliness among older people in the UK

    Loneliness can increase your risk of premature death by up to a quarter.

    Loneliness can be as harmful for our health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day.

    People with a high degree of loneliness are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s as people with a low degree of loneliness.

    Deficiencies in social relationships are associated with an increased risk of developing  Coronary Heart Disease and stroke.

    Age UK

    She has now grown a network of instructors across the UK who deliver exercise classes to thousands of older people every week.

    As well as the health benefits, Julie says there are social benefits to meeting up in classes like hers.

    She says : ‘Originally I started these classes for the exercise benefits but I saw that every week people were coming along because they were meeting people. It was a very natural and organic way to make friends.

    ‘This is about people living better, more independent lives but also about reducing loneliness. We did a study with the Royal Voluntary Service which shows that this type of class works.

    ‘The proof is there for everyone to see. They come early and they don’t want to leave at the end. They natter all the time and they just love it.

    ‘I think it’s really positive that the government are doing this. We have run classes in GP services for 12 weeks and then they go onto a community class.

    ‘Those people would probably have never come to an exercise class because they don’t think they can. If the doctor says they want them to come to the group, they are more likely to agree. Often they make so many friends, they go from an exercise avoider to an exercise lover.’

    MORE: Sainsbury’s is testing out talking tables to combat loneliness

    MORE: Loneliness is not something GPs can solve alone

    MORE: Cooking and dancing to be prescribed to cure loneliness instead of drugs


    IMG_9276-579bIMG_9276-579blauraabernethy6Doreen and Sheila (Picture: Julie Robinson)TOPSHOT - Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May reacts as she talks with people attending a social group in Vauxhall, south London, on October 15, 2018, where she launched the government's loneliness strategy. (Photo by Stefan Rousseau / POOL / AFP)STEFAN ROUSSEAU/AFP/Getty ImagesIMG_9276-579bIMG_9276-579blauraabernethy6Doreen and Sheila (Picture: Julie Robinson)TOPSHOT - Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May reacts as she talks with people attending a social group in Vauxhall, south London, on October 15, 2018, where she launched the government's loneliness strategy. (Photo by Stefan Rousseau / POOL / AFP)STEFAN ROUSSEAU/AFP/Getty Images

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    Butler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.
    (Picture: Essex Gazette / SWNS.com)

    A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home were visited and served up a three-course meal by butlers in the buff.

    The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of naked butlers, who served the ladies up a three course dinner.

    There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.

    Butlers in the buff with Joan Corp at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.
    (Picture: Essex Gazette / SWNS.com)

    Claire Martin, activities co-coordinator at Milton Lodge, a retirement home in Colchester which runs a Sparkle initiative, where staff raise money to grant the wishes of residents, said it was 89-year-old Joan Corp who had initiated it all.

    She said: ‘Whenever you ask Joan what she wants that day she always says “a man”.

    Butlers in the buff serving dinner at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.
    (Picture: Essex Gazette / SWNS.com)

    ‘So we weren’t surprised when she wanted it to be her wish.

    ‘We had a chat here and everyone was really keen to support it.

    ‘We had a look online and found a company called Hunks in Trunks.

    Butlers in the buff serving dinner at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.
    (Picture: Essex Gazette / SWNS.com)

    ‘When they turned up we had to let them know what we wanted them to do.’

    The ladies all enjoyed a roast dinner and two other courses with their daughters and granddaughters, who came along too.

    The butlers were also asked to do some ‘harmless flirting’ – which the ladies loved.

    Butlers in the buff with Joan Corp at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.
    (Picture: Essex Gazette / SWNS.com)

    Doll Jenkins, the oldest resident aged 99, said she loved the butlers in the buff and has requested for them to be back for her 100th birthday.

    Claire added: ‘The ladies were really excited, they had all been giggling and they dressed up.’

    Butler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.
    (Picture: Essex Gazette / SWNS.com)

    Resident at the home Gladas Smith, aged 82, said: ‘I had the front seat. It made quite a change and the boys did well.

    ‘It was a good evening.’

    The women were also treated to some relaxing therapy.

    Butler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.
    (Picture: Essex Gazette / SWNS.com)

    Claire said: ‘They all had a massage, the butlers went around asking the ladies if they wanted a massage and they all said yes.

    ‘After it had all finished, Doll told the staff she wanted them back for her 100th birthday, so we are going to have them back.

    ‘They didn’t stop laughing the whole night, they absolutely loved it.’

    MORE: Cat lovers, rejoice: You can now buy a pussy themed merkin

    MORE: Mum with fear of Halloween wants to pay someone to take her kids trick-or-treating


    SEI_35153212-928bSEI_35153212-928bhattiegladwellmetroButler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff with Joan Corp at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff serving dinner at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff serving dinner at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff with Joan Corp at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.SEI_35153212-928bSEI_35153212-928bhattiegladwellmetroButler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff with Joan Corp at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff serving dinner at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff serving dinner at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butlers in the buff with Joan Corp at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.Butler in the buff with Peggy Rogers at Milton Care Lodge in Colchester, Essex. See SWNS copy SWCAbutlers: A group of elderly female residents at a retirement home have been served some cheeky dinners - after 'butlers in the buff' came to visit them. The care home granted the wish of their elderly residents and hired a group of scantily clad butlers, who served the ladies up a three-course meal. There were 23 guests in total with 11 of them being residents at the Milton Lodge retirement home at Colchester, Essex.

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    Now you can take Belle with you on a night out (Picture: Disney Store, Oh My Disney)

    If you happen to be old enough to remember watching your favourite Disney movies on VHS, then you’re going to love these new accessories.

    Disney has re-purposed the covers of their classic video releases into adorable and surprisingly stylish clutch bags. Seriously – we would wear these.

    Take a leaf out of Peter Pan’s book – who says you have to grow up? Now you can wear your 90s childhood with pride, and bring Aladdin, Simba and Belle with you wherever you go.

    Disney Store Oh My Disney VHS Clutch Bag ??17.00
    (Picture: Disney Store, Oh My Disney)

    The Lion King, Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast are the first three classics to get the high-fashion make-over, so now all you have to do is choose your favourite.

    If that proves too difficult, with a price tag of just £17, you can probably treat yourself to the full set. Prove your Disney-fanatic credentials by turning up to every function sporting a different princess or hero.

    Disney Store Oh My Disney VHS Clutch Bag ??17.00
    (Picture: Disney Store, Oh My Disney)

    The first Disney movie to be released on VHS was Dumbo, back in 1981. The final film to make it on to video tape was Bambi in 2006, since then the animation giant has only released films onto DVD and streaming platforms.

    Disney Store Oh My Disney VHS Clutch Bag ??17.00
    (Picture: Disney Store, Oh My Disney)

    Despite Disney not releasing a movie on video for more than 12 years, the nostalgia around VHS tapes is strong. We all remember the days of going to Blockbuster for rentals, spending hours rewinding the tape and screaming at our siblings for taping over precious recordings.

    The Netflix generation might have taken over, but it’s nice to know that the simpler times of watching Disney on VHS haven’t quite been relegated to the past.

    MORE: Keira Knightley ‘bans’ daughter from watching Disney movies as she promotes Nutcracker movie

    MORE: Why are the Bake Off contestants all wearing Hawaiian shirts this week?

    MORE: Stella McCartney launches breast cancer charity after losing her mum


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    (Picture: Getty)

    New research has found that giving your partner the silent treatment could actually keep your relationship going.

    Yes, simply ignoring them instead of arguing could extend your time together. Who knew.

    Also known as the ‘cold shoulder’, the silent treatment has previously been linked to less intimacy and poorer health.

    But now, the first study of its kind has found that it can actually work – but only depending on how much you earn.

    Ignoring a spouse’s demands is likely to be the best policy for those on a lower-income.

    But the controversial tactic backfires among those on higher salaries, say psychologists.

    Lead author Jaclyn Ross, of California University in Los Angeles, explained: ‘Consider this example:

    Shot of a young woman looking upset after a fight with her husband in the background
    (Picture: Getty)

    ‘A wife requests her husband ask for a raise at work. For a husband in a low-wage job with less job security, that is a risky proposition.

    ‘By showing reluctance to ask for the raise, he can preserve his self-esteem and lessen emphasis on the couple’s vulnerable financial situation.

    ‘For a wealthier couple in the same situation, the wife may perceive the husband is unwilling to make a sacrifice for his family and that can cause friction in the relationship.’

    Dubbed ‘demand-withdraw’ behaviour, it has been documented by clinicians since the 1930s – but only recently researched.

    It’s been found to be one of the most frequently used responses to conflict in romances – and a major cause of divorce.

    But the US team say the classic ‘relationship stalemate’ when a partner shuts down at being asked to do something is much more complicated than previously believed.

    Graduate student Ms Ross and colleagues said previous studies on the phenomenon have focused almost exclusively on white middle class couples.

    They came up with conflicting results suggesting the common behaviour could be harmful – or helpful.

    So the latest published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology included more racially and ethnically diverse participants – and analysed their socioeconomic status.

    (Picture: Getty)

    It found giving the silent treatment helped relationships stay stable for couples with less financial resources – and decline for those who were more affluent.

    Interestingly, relationship satisfaction dropped for lower-income couples when the picked on spouse did not ‘exhibit strong withdrawal behaviours’.

    Co-author Professor Thomas Bradbury said: ‘Even though it’s easier for wealthier couples to access resources to address their relationship problems, it can also create higher expectations that partners will make accommodations for one another’s demands and needs that underlie their problems.

    ‘But if those expectations are not met, rifts can occur in the relationship and exacerbate the existing problems.’

    As in earlier studies it focused on the wife giving the demand – and the husband being the one to withdraw.

    Examples of the behaviour included the wives being hostile, dominating, threatening or blaming – while their husbands avoided the confrontation.

    To get these findings, the researchers conducted two experiments.

    The first followed 515 couples with at least one child or one on the way for 18 months, four-in-ten of which were below the poverty line.

    They were visited in their homes and asked to engage in a series of discussions about something each partner wanted to change about themselves – as well as a topic of disagreement.

    The second recruited 414 newlywed couples who were asked to do the same.

    They were seen four times over 27 months.

    (Picture: Getty)

    Again the disadvantaged volunteers experienced more dissatisfaction when the husbands displayed lower withdrawal in the face of the wives’ demands.

    But it was not as robust this time – possibly because they had only just got hitched whereas the others had been married for an average of five years.

    She said the study highlights the importance of using diverse samples in research on couples because results can vary based on differing life circumstances.

    The results could benefit counsellors who work with couples in therapy and policymakers focused on marriage and family.

    Jaclyn said: ‘Life circumstances may matter for relationships far more than we think – so much so that these circumstances appear to moderate the effects of communication on how happy we are in our partnerships.

    ‘Creating safe and secure environments helps to allow partners to relate well to each other and to their children, giving more people the kinds of relationships and families that will keep them healthy and happy.’

    Of course, giving the silent treatment to sort out your differences shouldn’t be your first port of call.

    And, previous research has suggested that people who resort to it are more prone to anxiety and aggression, with it being the most common pattern of conflict in marriage or in any committed, established romantic relationship.

    This could also lead to psychological issues that ultimately develop into physical ones such as urinary, bowel and erectile dysfunction.

    Psychologists call it the demand-withdraw pattern which happens when one partner makes constant requests of the other and is met with frequent repudiation.

    Typically, the way the refusing partner expresses their denial is by ignoring their partner – which is of course what is known as the silent treatment.

    And it doesn’t matter whether you’re male or female – as another study based on more than 14,000 people found the damage remained the same.

    However, it was found that women are more likely than men to be the demanders when it comes to the silent treatment.

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    TALK TO THE HAND - Giving your partner the 'silent treatment' could keep a relationship goingTALK TO THE HAND - Giving your partner the 'silent treatment' could keep a relationship goinghattiegladwellmetroShot of a young woman looking upset after a fight with her husband in the backgroundTALK TO THE HAND - Giving your partner the 'silent treatment' could keep a relationship goingTALK TO THE HAND - Giving your partner the 'silent treatment' could keep a relationship goinghattiegladwellmetroShot of a young woman looking upset after a fight with her husband in the background

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    Muslims are rarely given mainstream spaces to speak about their experiences, much less make a joke out of it.

    But a comedy show, led by charity ‘Penny Appeal’ is changing that. Introducing esteemed and up and coming artists, the Super Muslim Comedy show is touring the UK with a number of talented acts from home and away.

    All proceeds from the comedy tour will go towards Penny Appeal’s Education First programme, which helps to open new schools in countries around the world.

    The show will run from October to November and travel through 11 major cities, so find out if yours makes the list.

    Muslim comedy show on tour
    (Picture: Penny Appeal)

    The tour’s line up includes Guz Khan from the BBC 3 series Man Like Mobeen, Citizen Khan’s Abdullah Afzal, British stand-up comedian Jeff Mirza, and American film and comedy star, Omar Regan.

    Now in its third year, and following the success of last year, the show will also include two American comediennes Salma Hindy and Yasmin Elhady who are headlining.

    Penny Appeal CEO Aamer Naeem said with Islamophobia on the rise, it’s good to be part of a positive message.

    ‘It will be a unique opportunity for families and communities to come together and have a hilarious evening whilst helping launch a new campaign to help forgotten children who desperately need interventions,’ he told Metro.co.uk.’

    Two shows are scheduled for London.

    Tickets start at £10 with premium seating available for £20 per ticket. More information available here.

    Tour dates

    24/10/18 – West Park (Hotel), 319 Perth Rd, Dundee, DD2 1NN

    25/10/18 – River Palace, Tradeston Street, Glagow G5 8BH

    26/10/18 – King Georges Hall, Northgate, Blackburn BB2 1AA

    27/10/18 – Usmania Banqueting Hall 39 Varley Street Manchester M40 8EE

    28/10/18 – The Bradford Hotel, Hall Ings, Bradford, BD1 5SH

    29/10/18 – Bolton Excellency, 8 Carlton St. Bolton LS2 1BT

    30/10/18 – Sapphire Suite, 88 Surrey St, Leicester LE4 6FG

    31/10/18 – Royal Mint, 11-12 king William Street CV15JD Coventry,

    01/11/18 – Copthorne Hotel, Slough, Cippenham Lane, SL1 2YE

    02/11/18 – Crown Banqueting, 7 Upper Trinity St, Birmingham B9 4EG

    03/11/18 – The Atrium London, 124-126 Cheshire Street, E2 6EJ

    04/11/18 – Porchester Hall, Porchester Road, London W2 5HS

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    (Picture: Getty)

    There’s something about before and after pictures that are so satisfying. We humans are just wired to enjoy them.

    Our obsession with them extends to interiors – watching a messy room turn into a tidy haven is just cathartic.

    And cleanliness is having a bit of a moment on Instagram.

    Take Mrs. Hinch for example, the cleaning influencer with over 900,000 followers.

    With cutesy nicknames like Hinching (the act of a shopping haul buying bathroom and kitchen detergents, liquids, and sprays), plus a handful of other social media celebs making cleaning cool, how is the craze affecting our skin?

    After all, household cleaning products have chemicals in them that can be dangerous upon contact, especially if we’re regularly using them.

    (Picture: Getty)

    To keep our homes, furniture, and clothes fresh and sweet-smelling, we use various soaps, detergents, bleaching agents, and softeners.

    But they can be pretty toxic to our health.

    The most dangerous are corrosive drain cleaners, oven cleaners, and acidic toilet bowl cleaners as they can cause severe burns on eyes, skin and, if ingested, on the throat and oesophagus.

    Many of them, if they include ingredients such as chlorine or ammonia, can cause skin irritation so you should always wear gloves when handling.

    Some all-purpose cleaners contain the agents that create the soapy lather which can react with nitrites to form nitrosamines – carcinogens (cancer-causing substance) that readily penetrate the skin.

    Skin also easily absorbs nerve-damaging chemical, butyl cellosolve, present in some cleaners.

    Mathew Gass from the British Association of Dermatologists told Metro.co.uk whether smothering surfaces with cleaning products could trigger skin conditions, or if your hands could develop psoriasis from regular cleaning.

    ‘You can’t develop psoriasis from cleaning, but harsh chemicals as you might find in detergents can cause irritant dermatitis,’ he said.

    ‘It is also possible to develop allergic contact dermatitis to some of the chemicals in these products.’

    Dermatitis and eczema mean the same thing. Contact dermatitis describes inflammation that is caused by direct skin contact with something in your environment.

    Irritant contact dermatitis develops when the skin is in contact with irritating substances like detergents and solvents. These strip the skin surface of its natural oils. Dermatitis develops when there is regular or prolonged contact with these irritating substances.

    The most important factors in causing this type of contact dermatitis are the amount and the concentration of substance touching the skin. It’s very common in people who have their hands in water a lot such as nurses, hairdressers, bartenders, cooks, and cleaners.

    Anyone can develop an irritant contact hand dermatitis from handling irritating substances or with frequent hand washing.

    How to clean safely

    The Organic Consumer Association says:

    1. Although most cleaners don’t list ingredients, you can learn something about a product’s hazards by reading its label. Most labels bear a signal word, such as danger, warning or caution, that provides some indication of a product’s toxicity. Choose products that are nontoxic. Look for instructions on how to use the product, which may help you avoid injury. Some labels do list active ingredients, which may help you detect caustic or irritating ingredients you may wish to avoid.

    2. When gauging ecological claims, look for specifics. For example, ‘biodegradable in three to five days’ holds a lot more meaning than ‘biodegradable,’ as most substances will eventually break down if given enough time and the right ecological conditions. And claims like ‘no solvents,’ ‘no phosphates,’ or ‘plant-based’ are more meaningful than vague terms like ‘ecologically-friendly’ or ‘natural’.

    3. When ingredients are listed, choose products made with plant-based instead of petroleum-based ingredients.

    4. To reduce packaging waste: Choose cleaners in the largest container sizes available. Select products in bottles made with at least some recycled plastic. And choose concentrated formulas, which contain only 20% or less water. Because dilution with water is done at home, not at the factory, concentrated cleaners overall require less packaging and fuels for shipping.

    5. If you get bleach on your skin, sponge the area with something made of an absorbent material, such as a thick wet washcloth, and wring the excess water into a sink. If you have rubber gloves, put them on while you clean the bleach off your skin. Throw the gloves away and wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water when you are done rinsing the bleach off of your skin.

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    Woman cleaning kitchen counterWoman cleaning kitchen counterfaimabakar1Woman cleaning kitchen counterWoman cleaning kitchen counterfaimabakar1

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    Composite image - Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018 (LEFT) and back in 1955 (RIGHT). The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.
    Now and then (Picture: SWNS.com)

    Although they say absence makes the heart grow fonder, but 40 years would be quite enough for some people.

    Not for Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, who remarried last week after four decades apart.

    The couple wed at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford on Wednesday 10 October, sharing the special day with their six children.

    It certainly wasn’t an easy journey getting to that point, though.

    They first met at a dance hall in Peckham in 1955, before getting married and starting a family.

    Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018. The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.
    They tied the knot despite health complications (Picture: SWNS.com)

    Charlie and Audrey divorced in 1978, with the younger children being split between the parents, and the older ones moving into their own homes.

    The divorce was due to a ‘mistake’ on Charlie’s part according to their son Ian, 47.

    He told News Shopper that his ‘mum was quite unforgiving at the time and the family broke up.’

    Neither of the pair were truly happy after the breakup, though, which was something that their children could notice.

    When Audrey’s second husband passed away, the children intervened.

    Collect picture of their first wedding of Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 taken back in 1955. Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018. The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.
    On their first wedding back in 1955 (Picture: SWNS.com)

    Ian said, ‘We said to dad, ‘you’re not happy so why not live with mum.’

    ‘And that’s when it happened. They have seen sense.’

    Ian was his dad’s best man, and says that the wedding was like something from a movie.

    He says, ‘It was a fabulous day that had a magical dream like Disney quality. The venue has some fantastic rose gardens that looked great in the autumn sun and they provided a great backdrop for some memorable photos.’

    Although they had planned to have a bigger party at a pub afterwards, Audrey broke her hip and it had to be rescheduled.

    They still enjoyed the jazz music they listened to when they met, however, and will have a great dance when she’s fighting fit once again.

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    SEI_35309373-c69cSEI_35309373-c69cjessicacvlComposite image - Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018 (LEFT) and back in 1955 (RIGHT). The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018. The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.Collect picture of their first wedding of Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 taken back in 1955. Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018. The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.SEI_35309373-c69cSEI_35309373-c69cjessicacvlComposite image - Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018 (LEFT) and back in 1955 (RIGHT). The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018. The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.Collect picture of their first wedding of Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 taken back in 1955. Charlie 88 and Audrey Hailes 83 photographed at their wedding today, October 10, 2018. The couple have spent 40 years divorced and have now fallen back in love and have remarried today at Dartford Registry office, Kent. See NATIONAL story NNMARRY. An elderly couple who spent 40 years divorced have fallen back in love and and have just remarried. Charlie and Audrey Hailes, 88 and 83, tied the knot again at The Manor Gatehouse in Dartford in front of their six children. The couple, who spent most of their lives in Green Street Green, London, before recently moving to Wilmington, divorced in 1978 after falling out.

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    This winter you don’t have to just watch romantic Christmas scenes in movies, but live it in real life. SalzburgerLand makes for a perfect winter getaway. Situated not far from the majestic Austrian Alps, the romantic city of Salzburg offers more than just skiing, although there’s plenty of that too in surrounding areas.

    Steeped in history, Salzburg city sits on the border with Germany, with breathtaking views of the Alps and is split by the Salzach River and is renowned for its baroque architecture. Once home to Mozart and the fictional home of the Trapp family in the Sound of Music, Salzburg has many strings to its bow.

    With British Airways flights from London Gatwick starting from only £31 each way*, in a few hours you can find yourself tracing Julie Andrews’ steps in the Mirabell Gardens and recreating the ‘doe, a deer’ scene, or climbing to the top of Mönchsberg for unforgettable views. In just a short trip, by lunchtime you can even lose yourself in the winding lanes of the Christmas markets as you go from stall to stall snapping up your Christmas treats.

    If you want to get out of the city, and feel the powdery snow beneath your boots, then there is plenty on offer in SalzburgerLand with the Alpine pastures, stunning mountains, breathtaking glaciers and serene lakes to be enjoyed.

    Here’s why you should make Salzburgerland the next place you visit this winter:

    1. Christmas Markets

    Wafts of homemade apple strudel and mulled wine will entice you into the Christmas Market in Cathedral Square. It’s the oldest market in Salzburg and considered one of Europe’s best. With over 100 stalls, you’ll be able to browse locally made trinkets, jewellery and mouth-watering delicacies. You’ll also be able to snap up locally made candles and unique Christmas decorations as you gear up to the big day. But not just a market, there are also advent activities to get you in the spirit, including Christmas stories for children, guided tours and carols performed by the local choirs. Salzburg, and the mountain villages around the whole of Salzburgerland, are known for the array of different markets for visitors and locals alike to enjoy, this is where traditions are kept and the homely atmosphere is enjoyed during advent.

    For more information visit here.

    2. Skiing

    Of course skiing is one of the main attractions for SalzburgerLand, which boasts over 2,000km of pistes. The area is not short of adventure that suits every level of skier. You can also let the stars guide you as you can go night-skiing at Maria Alm, Obertauern and Nagelkopfl Fun Mountain, to name a few. While the Rauris Valleys and Forstau are perfect for young families that want a safe place for little ones to practice on the slopes. There is over 23 ski regions to choose from, and find your perfect spot.

    Making your life a lot easier is the Salzburg Super Ski Card that you can buy that will open up all of the ski runs for you, allowing you to be flexible and make the most of your time, starting at 56 euro a day for an adult.

    For more information on how to get there and make it your best ski trip- visit ba.com/salzburg and salzburgerland.com/en/ski-board

    3. Rest and relaxation

    Unwind with unbeatable scenery and surroundings in SalzburgerLand, instead of thermal undies, why not try a thermal spa instead? There are a number of spas in SalzburgerLand that suit adults and families, but with a wide range of treatments available.

    Tauern Spa Kaprun has its own kidstein – so there’s adult time while the kids enjoy the bubbles and waterfalls as well as the adventure grotto. Who doesn’t love an adventure grotto? With views of the snow-covered summit of Kitzsteinhorn mountain, guests can relax and unwind in a skyline pool on the top floor before enjoying the open fireplace in the lounge.

    You can get your baked goods at the same time as you’re pruning yourself at the Tauern Spa Kaprun, where its baking oven sauna is the place to visit. Yes, you can get fresh bread rolls after your spa session as they are actually baked there – on site!

    Felsentherme, which is located in Bad Gastein, offers extraordinary views of the mountains for guests as they forget their woes in the stone pine sauna or tunnel sauna, alternatively if you’re feeling adventurous there is a nudist terrace with two cold and warm water ‘summit pools’. Apparently there’s nothing like running out of the sauna into the snow stark naked – but we’ll take your word for it.

    To find the right spa for you, visit here.

    4. Eat, drink and be merry

    Christmas markets and Austrian cafes have tasty offerings including traditional bites such as lebkuchen. The ginger biscuits are often prepared for the Christmas markets and are hard to resist. Glühwein, also known as mulled wine, is prepared with a traditional Austrian recipe and can keep you warm as you check out the sights. But, also Salzburg is home to the oldest restaurant in Europe at St Peter’s Abbey. With over 1200 years of history, this monastery is a sight to behold, with its ancient walls and decor.

    Adding to this, you can sample Salzburg’s cuisine with the delightful Via Culinaria. The perfect find for foodies, this experience promises to take you on a culinary journey across nine different themes with 260 ‘taste addresses’, sampling the most delicious local produce – so you are bound to find at least one to that gets your tastebuds going. There’s the Culinary Pathway for Gourmets, the Culinary Pathway for Fish Fans – as well as Meat Eaters and Herb Lovers. With the key ingredients for Via Culinaria being ‘regionality, originality, quality and authenticity’, you know you’re in for a treat. To discover more, click here.

    5. Mozart

    You can’t really come to Salzburg and not appreciate Mozart. The prolific composer was born in the city and is its most famous son. Take a visit to the two places that Mozart called home (try late afternoon when the coach tours depart). His birthplace is on the third floor of Hagenauer House, and is where the child prodigy lived with his family until he was 17. His first violin, which was given to him at the age of six in 1762, is on display here as well as his silk wallet. Mozart’s Residence is home to the museum about the composer – this usually takes around 90 minutes to get around.

    For more information, click here.

    6. Carols

    Speaking of music, if you’re not that into classical music, you can soak up the festive atmosphere with Christmas carols. Did you know that Salzburg is where “Silent Night! Holy Night!” was written? It’s actually been 200 years since the carol was first heard in 1818 in the Nikolas Church, before going on to become a staple of Christmas. SalzburgerLand, proud of its history is celebrating the significant milestone with a festival, an exhibition and a musical.

    If singing Christmas is your thing, then you’ll also be happy to know that Salzburg offers a sing along session with a choirmaster. The doors are open for all to attend a session within a cathedral every Tuesday night. (Ironically, there appears to be no Silent Night in sight!)

    For more information, visit here.

    7. Tobogganing

    Let your hair down, and fly down the mountain in your own toboggan. Now that is not something you can do every day. It’s a true winter classic, which you can do during the crisp day or before getting cosy at night. Not far from the city in Salzburg, in SalzburgerLand, there are a number of sledge runs that’ll get the adrenaline pumping for the most daring thrill seekers, or offer a more leisurely pace for those who want to soak up the twinkly night sky. You can rent out your sledge, or take your own, depending on how seasoned you are. For those that fancy a good Alpine view and want to take it easy, the gondola is the way to go before zipping down into the valley to the cosy mountain huts and their glühwein.

    They also have the world’s longest sledge run in the Wildkogel-Arena which is no less than 14km, which drops sledders an incredible 1,300m in elevation down the mountain during a trip of a lifetime that lasts between 30 – 50 minutes. Whether it’s a racing sled, a snazzy bob or even a traditional toboggan, you can ride whatever you like down the Wildkogel mountain, as long as it’s safe. So what will your ride of a lifetime be?

    For more info, click here.

    8. Snow hiking

    For the more energetic, snow hiking is also an option to get the blood pumping as you work up an appetite for traditional Austrian eats. You can quite literally get back to nature as you head off the beaten runs, and try to spot the Alpine wildlife and marvel at the magnificent glaciers, bringing those Instagram highlights you’ve pored over to real life. Earn the extra jars of mulled wine with a hike through the Alpine forest. One recommended trail is in Rauris Valley, in the Salzburg countryside which will take you three hours, but is well worth the effort to take in the splendour of the 15,000ft peaks.

    For more information, click here.

    9. Stunning views

    The romantic streets of Salzburg with its domes, spires, abbeys and museums are rich in history. The iconic Hohensalzburg Fortress towers over the city and is visible throughout the city streets and forms part of the Salzburg skyline. Popping up here will get you your bearings for the city. SalzburgerLand offers the best of both worlds, with snow covered mountains on one hand, the fast paced river through the middle and the baroque towers of the city buildings.

    Let’s not forget the breathtaking scenario that awaits you from the mountains.

    10. Getting about

    Travelling to Salzburg is great value for a European break with British Airways offering fares starting from £31 each way* from London Gatwick, based on a return fare, with up to 10 flights a week in the peak winter period.

    Once you get to the city, you can buy the Salzburg Card for 37 euros for 48 hours and this gives you unlimited access to public transport as well as entry to the city’s top sights. This makes a weekend getaway more manageable and more room for those Christmas treats.

    To find out more on how to get your card, click here.

    Transporting you to your chosen ski resort from the airport, there are a number of shuttles that you can pick up with ease after your flight.

    When you’re planning your trip to SalzburgerLand, make sure you take advantage of the SalzburgerLand Card. This guest card allows you to pay a visit to all of the top spots, with free or discounted access to around 190 attractions between six and 12 days.

    You can find more information on how to get your card, click here.

    To book your winter break to Salzburg – visit ba.com/salzburg 

    For more information about planning your trip- visit https://www.salzburgerland.com/en/

    *Limited availability. Prices are available each way based on a return ‘Basic’ Euro Traveller fare, from London Gatwick only, and include taxes, fees and charges. Correct as of 01/10/18 but are subject to change at any time. Departing from London Gatwick to Salzburg on select dates between 12/11/18 – 02/12/18 and between 07/01/19 – 20/01/19. See ba.com/gatwick for details.

    Pärchen bei Schlittenfahrt - Winterlandschaft  - SalzburgPärchen bei Schlittenfahrt - Winterlandschaft  - SalzburgclairejrutterPärchen bei Schlittenfahrt - Winterlandschaft - SalzburgPärchen bei Schlittenfahrt - Winterlandschaft - Salzburgclairejrutter

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    Yinka Bokinni is a presenter, DJ, and blogger (Picture: Yinka Bokinni)

    Don’t feel bad if your mornings are spent snoozing three hours past the time you intended to get up, followed by scrolling through Insta and eating toast in bed.

    Contrary to what glossy celeb profiles would have you believe, you’re not the only one with a less than glamorous morning routine.

    Morning Face is our new series giving you a glimpse of the actual morning routines of different brilliant people. So far we’ve woken up with Estée Lalonde, who starts her day by walking her dog and doing a face mask, and Sarah Alexander, whose chronic pain and disability means she usually wakes up exhausted and stiff all over.

    This week we’re seeing how presenter, DJ, and blogger Yinka Bokinni starts her day.

    She starts her morning at around 8am (Picture: Yinka Bokinni)

    Morning, Yinka. What time are you up? 

    I usually wake up between eight and nine each day and I get around seven or eight hours of sleep a night. I love sleep.

    Do you hit the snooze button?

    That depends, in the summer I am up and running around but once the mornings get colder the temptation to snooze becomes that much greater.

    What’s the first thing you do when you open your eyes?

    Yawn. I rarely set an alarm (my body is pretty reliable) so I check to make sure I haven’t over slept and then kiss the boyfriend, on the cheek because… morning breath.

    She’s a morning person (Picture: Yinka Bokinni)

    How do you get ready beauty-wise? 

    I drink a pint of lemon water when I first wake up, I read somewhere that its good for your skin but I am not sure how true that is, it’s just habit now.

    Getting ready takes me anywhere between five and fifty minutes. I can be pretty low maintenance if I need to be so it really does depend on what I’m doing but I feel a little silly if getting ready takes more than an hour.

    I listen to music upstairs and put the telly on downstairs. I come from a big family and am very used to lots of stuff going on. It’s a weird habit.

    How are you feeling first thing?

    I am 100% a morning person, the second I open my eyes I am awake awake, I love the morning.

    The first thing she drinks is a pint of lemon water (Picture: Yinka Bokinni)

    What’s the first thing you eat or drink?

    Water! And a banana. And coffee, of course.

    Then what? 

    I usually get dressed to leave the house so once my clothes are on I’m out the door. If I have a free day I shower and put pyjamas on.

    What do you need to have a good morning?

    A good night’s sleep, anything less than seven hours and I feel off my game the whole day.

    I hate rushing as well. For me a relaxed morning means I have a less stressful day so if it means waking up earlier I would prefer that over getting a lie-in and then having to brush my teeth in the shower because I’m late.

    Once she’s dressed it’s time to head out (Picture: Yinka Bokinni)

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    IMG_2752-6c51IMG_2752-6c51ellencscottIMG_2752-6c51IMG_2752-6c51ellencscott

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    Kittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescued
    (Picture: Cats Protection)

    Neptune, Sinbad and Galene are three brave little kittens who survived an ordeal together.

    They spent over a week trapped inside a car with no food or water on a journey from Cyprus to the UK, which is around 2,000 miles.

    On day 10 of the trip, the small cats were found in a car onboard a military vessel, Eddystone, travelling from Limassol in Cyprus to Southampton.

    The ship staff rescued the kitties and gave them their names. Now they’ve been given a clean bill of health by a vet and began a three-month stay in quarantine, paid for by Cats Protection who will find them a new home.

    Kittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescued
    (Picture: Cats Protection)
    Kittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescued
    (Picture: Cats Protection)

    ‘The staff were surprised to see three kittens sitting on the car’s dashboard staring out at them,’ said Patrick Fortnum, the ship’s agent.

    ‘The kittens were about three or four weeks old and were in remarkably good condition considering they’d had no food or water for a week. Their survival is miraculous.

    ‘Our staff quarantined them in an empty cabin for four days and kept them fed and warm. The kittens were very friendly and weren’t timid or shy at all.

    Kittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescued
    (Picture: Cats Protection)

    ‘We don’t know how they got into the car and they must have kept very quiet when the car was driven onto the boat because the driver didn’t hear or see anything odd.’

    ‘The car was locked at the port of Limassol so it’s possible their mum had exited the car sometime before and is still on the island.’

    Cats Protection has said the cost of the kittens’ quarantine and finding them a new home is likely to reach over £2,000 so they are relying on donations.

    If you would like to donate towards the cost of helping the kittens you can do so through JustGiving.

    MORE: Here’s why conkers are dangerous for your dog

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    MORE: Cat lovers, rejoice: You can now buy a pussy themed merkin


    SEI_35345590-22b2SEI_35345590-22b2faimabakar1Kittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescuedKittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescuedKittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescuedKittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescuedSEI_35345590-22b2SEI_35345590-22b2faimabakar1Kittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescuedKittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescuedKittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescuedKittens locked in a car for a week on journey from cyprus to UK rescued

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    (Picture: Retreat into Wonderland/SWNS.COM)

    Animal rights campaigners are desperately trying to raise money for an MRI in hopes of saving an epileptic pig.

    Angel the pig’s health is believed to have deteriorated due to either meningitis or starvation when she was a baby – now she is suffering from blindness, muscle spasms and seizures.

    She was immediately checked into an animal sanctuary in Herne Bay, Kent, back in March and was not expected to last the night.

    But Angel has come on ‘leaps and bounds’.

    Collect of Angel the disabled pig at the Retreat into Wonderland animal sanctuary, who needs ?3,000 to help her cope with constant spasms, seizures, and blindness.See national news story NNpiggy.A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to live, animal rights campaigners say. Angel the pig's health is believed to have deteriorated due to either meningitis or starvation when she was a youngster. She was immediately checked into an animal sanctuary in Herne Bay, Kent, back in March and was not expected to last the night.But she has come on 'leaps and bounds' despite suffering from muscle spasms and seizures - which make her cry out. The black speckled porker has also lost almost all of her sight.
    (Picture: Retreat into Wonderland/SWNS.COM)

    The black speckled pig has lost almost all of her sight, and now needs £3,000 for an MRI scan, and to have her liver and her bloods checked in hopes of finding out what is wrong with her, all to try to save her life.

    Jen Silk from the Retreat into Wonderland says the sanctuary is in a race against time to raise funds needed for treatment.

    She said: ‘We started to realise that when she’d walk, one side of her body wouldn’t move properly and she’d have muscle spasms.

    Collect of Angel the disabled pig at the Retreat into Wonderland animal sanctuary, who needs ?3,000 to help her cope with constant spasms, seizures, and blindness.See national news story NNpiggy.A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to live, animal rights campaigners say. Angel the pig's health is believed to have deteriorated due to either meningitis or starvation when she was a youngster. She was immediately checked into an animal sanctuary in Herne Bay, Kent, back in March and was not expected to last the night.But she has come on 'leaps and bounds' despite suffering from muscle spasms and seizures - which make her cry out. The black speckled porker has also lost almost all of her sight.
    (Picture: Retreat into Wonderland/SWNS.COM)

    ‘She keeps getting seizures and they have made her lose most of her sight. It’s very upsetting because she lets out a cry whenever she gets one and she gets very distraught afterwards.

    ‘Our vet seems to think she either had meningitis when she was a youngster and it hadn’t been treated or it could be a result of starvation.’

    According to Jen, there’s only one vet who can give Angel the treatment needed, and she’s based in Bristol.

    Appeal for Angel the pig to have MRI scan (Picture: Jen Silk)
    (Picture: Jen Silk)

    And so, she has set up a GoFundMe page to raise the money needed.

    She added: ‘It seems to be that with every seizure she loses more of her eyesight.

    ‘She’s such a happy, friendly girl. Because she’s so young she deserves that chance to live.

    ‘Angel is not in any pain and she is happy.

    ‘We are an animal sanctuary and all the time she is willing to fight and it is humane then we fight with her – because that is what we are signed up to do as a sanctuary.’

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    A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to liveA disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to livehattiegladwellmetroCollect of Angel the disabled pig at the Retreat into Wonderland animal sanctuary, who needs ?3,000 to help her cope with constant spasms, seizures, and blindness.See national news story NNpiggy.A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to live, animal rights campaigners say. Angel the pig's health is believed to have deteriorated due to either meningitis or starvation when she was a youngster. She was immediately checked into an animal sanctuary in Herne Bay, Kent, back in March and was not expected to last the night.But she has come on 'leaps and bounds' despite suffering from muscle spasms and seizures - which make her cry out. The black speckled porker has also lost almost all of her sight.Collect of Angel the disabled pig at the Retreat into Wonderland animal sanctuary, who needs ?3,000 to help her cope with constant spasms, seizures, and blindness.See national news story NNpiggy.A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to live, animal rights campaigners say. Angel the pig's health is believed to have deteriorated due to either meningitis or starvation when she was a youngster. She was immediately checked into an animal sanctuary in Herne Bay, Kent, back in March and was not expected to last the night.But she has come on 'leaps and bounds' despite suffering from muscle spasms and seizures - which make her cry out. The black speckled porker has also lost almost all of her sight.Appeal for Angel the pig to have MRI scan (Picture: Jen Silk)A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to liveA disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to livehattiegladwellmetroCollect of Angel the disabled pig at the Retreat into Wonderland animal sanctuary, who needs ?3,000 to help her cope with constant spasms, seizures, and blindness.See national news story NNpiggy.A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to live, animal rights campaigners say. Angel the pig's health is believed to have deteriorated due to either meningitis or starvation when she was a youngster. She was immediately checked into an animal sanctuary in Herne Bay, Kent, back in March and was not expected to last the night.But she has come on 'leaps and bounds' despite suffering from muscle spasms and seizures - which make her cry out. The black speckled porker has also lost almost all of her sight.Collect of Angel the disabled pig at the Retreat into Wonderland animal sanctuary, who needs ?3,000 to help her cope with constant spasms, seizures, and blindness.See national news story NNpiggy.A disabled pig suffering from seizures, muscle spasms and blindness needs ?3,000 to live, animal rights campaigners say. Angel the pig's health is believed to have deteriorated due to either meningitis or starvation when she was a youngster. She was immediately checked into an animal sanctuary in Herne Bay, Kent, back in March and was not expected to last the night.But she has come on 'leaps and bounds' despite suffering from muscle spasms and seizures - which make her cry out. The black speckled porker has also lost almost all of her sight.Appeal for Angel the pig to have MRI scan (Picture: Jen Silk)

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    Business people working at desks in office
    (Picture: Sam Diephuis/Blend Images LLC)

    Hey, remember last week when research noted that standing desks might improve work performance?

    Well, here’s another reason to convince your boss to buy in to the standing desk revolution: The Health Secretary thinks it’s a good idea.

    At the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress in London, Health Secretary Matt Hancock urged employers to offer standing desks and implement standing meetings.

    He said: ‘Workplaces can make a difference; encouraging breaks, offering standing desks, having standing meetings – which in my experience tend to finish quicker too.

    ‘Our message should be that movement is medicine.’

    Research shows that the use of stand or sit desks reduces the amount of time workers spend sitting, which in turn improves work performance, reduces fatigue, and reduces the likelihood of musculoskeletal issues.

    Metro.co.uk’s picture desk editor Steve Legere has been using a stand and sit desk for the last year, and describes it as a ‘game changer’.

    (Picture: Getty)

    ‘I have a neck issue caused from many years of training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and other combat sports,’ says Steve. ‘Which, when sitting for too long feels like needles in the top of my spine. Prolonged sitting is very uncomfortable indeed.

    ‘The standing desk basically gave me instant relief and I find if I rotate two hours standing and two hours sitting it keeps pain to a minimum.

    ‘Plus the feeling of actually looking forward to sitting down rather than “having” to sit down is a bonus.’

    While we know the dangers of a sedentary lifestyle, there’s ongoing debate about whether standing desks are the right solution.

    Claims that standing burns half the calories used by sitting have been debunked by a Harvard study that found the use of standing desks only burns an extra eight calories an hour compared to sitting. One study suggests that using standing desks may increase your risk of cardiovascular disease.

    It’s thought that the best solution is not necessarily to stand all day, but to make a habit of regular movement.

    So rather than getting rid of your chair, you alternate between sitting, standing, and moving around the office, whether that’s walking downstairs to grab a coffee or using the toilet on a different floor.

    A 2016 study suggests that spending two minutes of each hour walking reduces your risk of early death by a third.

    In short: If you’re keen to try a standing desk, there’s plenty of data to back up your need. Show it to your boss and convince them to give everyone the option to sit and stand as they choose.

    Standing meetings may also be a good shout, if only because they’ll speed things up as everyone is keen to get back to the sweet comforts of a deskchair.

    But no matter what type of desk you have, one quick thing you can do to boost your health is to move around every hour. Set an alarm on your phone if you need to, and encourage your deskmates to have a wander.

    MORE: Sainsbury’s is testing out talking tables to combat loneliness

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    Ask your boss for a standing deskAsk your boss for a standing deskellencscottBusiness people working at desks in officeAsk your boss for a standing deskAsk your boss for a standing deskellencscottBusiness people working at desks in office

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    This is why we need to keep telling the stories of the Windrush Generation Illustration by Dave Anderson
    The Windrush stories are in danger of being forgotten (Picture: Dave Anderson/Metro.co.uk)

    It was impossible to miss the news about the Windrush scandal as it unfolded earlier this year. Heartbreaking stories of British citizens torn away from their families and homes, denied benefits, healthcare and reentry to the country.

    But, as the scandal drops off the headlines, and the first generation of Windrush immigrants begins dying out, it’s vital that we keep the conversation going.

    The Windrush Generation is a term used to describe those arriving in the UK between 1948 and 1971 from Caribbean countries. They came under the impression that they were going to be UK citizens as they were travelling from British colonies.

    But when the Home Office destroyed landing cards belonging to Windrush migrants in 2010, their position in this country became unstable.

    File photo 22/06/48 of Jamaican immigrants welcomed by RAF officials from the Colonial Office after the ex-troopship HMT 'Empire Windrush' landed them at Tilbury. A day celebrating the Windrush generation and their descendants is to be held annually and will be supported by a grant of up to half-a-million pounds, the Government has announced.
    (Picture: PA Wire)

    Writer and deputy editor of Gal-Dem, Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff, is a third-generation Windrush immigrant – meaning her grandparents came over to the UK around 60 years ago. She thinks it’s more important than ever to keep telling their stories.

    ‘I always felt quite removed from my Caribbean heritage, and I always had such an interest in it from when I was really young. I think for a lot of us third-gens, our parents and grandparents aren’t very open with their experiences, so there’s a lot we don’t know,’ Charlie tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘Black history is so often sidelined. People do not know about the impacts of British colonialism and slavery – the Windrush story is so intrinsically tied to that.’

    Charlie has edited a new book that tackles just that. Mother Country: Real Stories of the Windrush Generation, addresses the lasting impacts of this mass migration to the UK and the true, heart-wrenching stories of displacement and resettlement in an, often hostile, new environment.

    The book sheds light on the untold stories of the Windrush Generation (Picture: Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff)

    ‘It was really important to me that David Lammy MP wrote the foreword to the book. He has made such strides in reminding people that this is actually about slavery. Which is a really important thing to highlight.

    ‘The same people who would say, “oh I don’t see colour”, would also probably say, “slavery was a long time ago, it’s in the past.” But no, because in our living memories, the people who are descended from slaves ended up here and we’re still seeing the effects of that.

    ‘It’s all part of the same narrative, it hasn’t gone away.’

    The book itself is a collection of essays and first-person accounts detailing the untold stories of the Windrush Generation. From first-generation immigrants forced to leave a child behind as they travelled to the other side of the world, to third-generation descendants, who have never stepped foot in the Carribbean, hearing these stories from their grandparents for the first time.

    Charlie thinks that the trauma of familial displacement can be passed down through the generations, so it’s important for descendants to learn about their history and understand how we got to where we are.

    For Charlie, writing the book was a journey of personal discovery (Picture: Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff)

    ‘Even though we might not be having those conversations, we can still feel it,’ she explains.

    ‘We are the first generation now who are making real, sustained gains in accessing education and high-powered career paths. But the barriers that we’re hitting, very much relate to the struggles that our grandparents and parents went through.

    ‘When I interviewed my own nanny about her Windrush story, she was a bus conductor when she moved over in 1960, and I hadn’t ever really put myself in her shoes like that.

    ‘She would go on to the buses after Enoch Powell’s infamous “Rivers of blood” speech, and she would hear people chanting, “Enoch, Enoch!” – which was terrifying for her.

    ‘Imagine being a young black woman on the buses facing that. She was in such a vulnerable position. And she just had to stop going up to the top decks to inspect tickets – she couldn’t be alone with them up there.’

    ‘The vast majority of the book is actually made up of second-generation immigrants, but a lot of the first generation are dying or they have Alzheimer’s and their memories are fading.

    ‘So many of the second-gens I spoke to told me how much they wished they had sat down and had those conversations with their parents. For the ones who did, I think it was a really cathartic process for them.

    ‘I think it is our responsibility, as third-generation descendants, to keep those narratives alive, and make our parents have those difficult conversations.’

    People, Immigration, pic: 22nd June 1948, Immigrants from the Caribbean island of Jamaica arrive at Tilbury, London, on board the " Empire Windrush", this party are 5 young boxers and their Manager (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)
    (Picture: Getty)

    But the narrative of the Windrush Generation isn’t only characterised by suffering and displacement. Charlie says that a lot of the people she interviewed had stories of hope and spoke of the transcendental power of a love strong enough to cross oceans.

    ‘The oldest woman I spoke to was 103. She had a fair few children and she had to leave them in Jamaica. They stayed with her sister and actually had a really lovey upbringing with their aunt.

    ‘When they finally came over to live with their mum in England, she went to meet them at the airport and she was so ridiculously excited that she was physically jumping above the crowd to try and spot them.

    ‘Her daughters told me that the first memory they have of her is seeing this little woman just bouncing with super-human ability in this airport terminal.’

    Mother Country is published by Headline and will be available from 18 October.

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    SEI_35337971-db92SEI_35337971-db92nataliemorris88This is why we need to keep telling the stories of the Windrush Generation Illustration by Dave AndersonFile photo 22/06/48 of Jamaican immigrants welcomed by RAF officials from the Colonial Office after the ex-troopship HMT 'Empire Windrush' landed them at Tilbury. A day celebrating the Windrush generation and their descendants is to be held annually and will be supported by a grant of up to half-a-million pounds, the Government has announced.People, Immigration, pic: 22nd June 1948, Immigrants from the Caribbean island of Jamaica arrive at Tilbury, London, on board the SEI_35337971-db92SEI_35337971-db92nataliemorris88This is why we need to keep telling the stories of the Windrush Generation Illustration by Dave AndersonFile photo 22/06/48 of Jamaican immigrants welcomed by RAF officials from the Colonial Office after the ex-troopship HMT 'Empire Windrush' landed them at Tilbury. A day celebrating the Windrush generation and their descendants is to be held annually and will be supported by a grant of up to half-a-million pounds, the Government has announced.People, Immigration, pic: 22nd June 1948, Immigrants from the Caribbean island of Jamaica arrive at Tilbury, London, on board the " Empire Windrush", this party are 5 young boxers and their Manager (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)

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    Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Taylim Prince from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Alice Mann/PA)

    In case you hadn’t guessed, winning the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize is a big deal.

    Thousands of images are submitted each year (4,462 this year, to be exact) to battle to be named the best portrait and go on display in the National Portrait Gallery – a huge honour for any artist.

    Out of a 50-strong shortlist, Alice Mann has scooped the 2018 prize with her portraits of all-female teams of drum majorettes.

    It’s the first time in the competition’s history that judges have awarded the first prize to a series of pictures rather than an individual photograph, so, as we said, the win is a very big deal.

    The judges said that the girls’ ‘pristine and vibrant outfits […] jar with the rundown surroundings, lending a surreal and enigmatic atmosphere to the portraits.’

    You don’t need to use that kind of artsy language to enjoy the pictures, thankfully. They’re just brilliant photos.

    A portrait of a London mother cradling her daughter, by Enda Bowe, won second prize, and joint third prize went to Max Marstow’s portrait of a pair of shoppers and Joey Lawrence’s image of a child in a jungle in Sierra Leone.

    Take a look at the first prize winning images below.

    Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Keisha Ncube from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Alice Mann/PA Wire)
    Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Tanique Williams from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Alice Mann/PA Wire)
    Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Wakiesha Titus and Riley Van Harte from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
    (Picture: Alice Mann/PA Wire)

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    Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait PrizeTaylor Wessing Photographic Portrait PrizeellencscottUndated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Taylim Prince from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Keisha Ncube from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Tanique Williams from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Wakiesha Titus and Riley Van Harte from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait PrizeTaylor Wessing Photographic Portrait PrizeellencscottUndated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Taylim Prince from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Keisha Ncube from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Tanique Williams from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.Undated handout photo issued by the National Portrait Gallery of Wakiesha Titus and Riley Van Harte from the series Drummies by Alice Mann, which has won this year's Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. The ?15,000 award was presented to the South African photographer, who is based in London, at an awards ceremony at the National Portrait Gallery. See PA story ARTS Portrait. Photo credit should read: Alice Mann/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

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    ***ILLUSTRATION REQUEST*** Why cancelling my wedding was the best thing that ever happened to me (for May 18th)
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Most of us have come to the consensus that feminism is about choice. Yes, you can be a feminist and watch Love Island. Yes, you can be a feminist and wear pink.

    But when it comes to weddings, many of us still find it difficult to reconcile our feminist beliefs with some of the conventions of heterosexual marriage.

    For example – taking your partner’s name. It could be argued that the tradition of the woman losing her maiden name and automatically taking her husband’s is an erasure of her identity.

    Why should it fall to the woman to sacrifice her family name, which has likely been an integral part of her identity for her entire life up until this point?

    For some, the wedding ring is a symbol of eternal love, worn on the fourth finger for a direct connection to the heart. But for others, the ring is a symbol of ownership.

    Traditionally it is only women who wear engagement rings, a physical signifier that they are ‘taken’, that they already belong to someone.

    Being physically given away by a man, only to be given to another man. This one’s not exactly veiled. The message couldn’t be clearer. The bride used to belong to her father, now she belongs to her husband. Hurrah! Happy wedding day!

    ‘To honour and obey,’ again, not so subtle. This vow, which many couples now chose to omit from their ceremony, gives the clear impression that the husband has the power over his wife.

    By promising to ‘obey’, a woman is automatically placed beneath her partner in the hierarchies of power.

    I take issue with the virginal connotations of the white dress. An image of the bride as a pure, unspoiled creature of angelic innocence. Because a woman who has had pre-marital sex is ruined and spent and unworthy of love. Obviously.

    When it comes to the speeches, traditionally female voices are all but drowned out. The best man, father of the bride and often the groom hog the mic – no women are invited to speak.

    If the bride and female family members are silenced at the ceremony, it doesn’t bode well for an equal footing going forward.

    **ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** X mistakes I've already made while planning my wedding - 500 words (Abby)
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    I’m being intentionally facetious, and for many people these archaic traditions no longer represent the things they once did. And there are a litany of other reasons why people want to get married.

    Namely, love. A public declaration of your love and devotion for your partner. A proclamation, in front of the people you both care about the most, that you want to commit yourselves to each other.

    Anna, a 27-year-old artist, wants to get married. She doesn’t think that her desire for marriage compromises her identity as a feminist.

    ‘Choosing to share your life with someone has nothing to do with your ability to be a feminist and to empower women,’ she tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘We’re not necessarily talking about a woman marrying a man, it could be a woman marrying a woman, or a man marrying a man. Marriage can mean so many different things.

    ‘There are old traditions that are tied up with marriage – but many of them have really evolved over the years. My personal view of marriage is a sharing of love and responsibility and trust. It’s more of a partnership than someone belonging to someone else.

    ‘If you find someone in your life that you want to treat as an equal, and you want to share your life with them – I think that can only improve and support your ability to be independent and empower other people around you.’

    Rather than inhibiting your freedom, Anna says a happy and successful marriage can actually make you a better feminist.

    ‘Happy relationships foster an environment for you to be your best self. And when you’re doing that, you’ll be able to support other people too. Marriage doesn’t have to be this little unit of two people, and that’s all it ever is. It’s bigger than that.

    ‘I think some people have warped ideas about feminism these days. They think you have to be this strong, independent woman who doesn’t need anyone and does everything by herself, and doesn’t need support.

    ‘But that’s bullsh*t. That’s not what feminism is. Everybody needs a support system. Everybody needs a community. Whether that’s family, or a friendship group, or a partner.

    ‘It doesn’t make you any less of a feminist because you choose to share your life with somebody. Feminism is about empowering other women and bringing equality to the whole system. It doesn’t have any bearing on love or relationships.’

    Why I waited till marriage to have sex (Tola) Marriage couple wedding day church Picture: Dave Anderson for Metro.co.uk
    (Picture: Dave Anderson for Metro.co.uk)

    There are so many different ways to get married – and your wedding can look exactly like you want it to. Double-barrel names? No problem. Don’t want a church or vows? Totally fine. So is it really the case that weddings and feminism have to be mutually exclusive?

    If we now have the power to make our weddings completely personal to us – surely it’s possible to maintain your feminist values whilst also wearing the diamante princess dress of your childhood dreams.

    Tips for a fairy tale feminist wedding

    ‘Miss out the to obey vow. There are so many other alternatives now. Be inspired by the Duchesses of Cambridge and Sussex, who didn’t include these vows in their wedding speeches to two of the most powerful men in England!

    ‘If you want to switch up your wedding vows to be more pro-feminist, swap old phrases for new, or write them yourself.

    ‘Feminists will agree that you can still rock a white dress no matter your sexual history, as being a modern woman is all about making your own choices. However, if you do want to break free from this trend, the coloured dress is definitely making its way back into fashion. Or opt for a three-piece suit.

    ‘The idea that the bridal party should be entirely made up of women (and vice versa) is just outdated. Nowadays, there’s no need to segregate your friends based on gender.

    ‘Just involve the people in your wedding who you want to involve. There’s nothing to stop you from having bridesmen or groomsmaids.

    ‘Despite all these tips to have a feminist wedding, remember that the best way to have a truly feminist wedding is to do whatever you want. If you love tradition, keep it. If you don’t, forget it!’

    Lisa Forde, wedding etiquette expert and Director of wedding stationary company, Tree of Hearts

    Hayley is getting married in 2020, and she and her partner are planning to adapt the ceremony to make it much more feminist-friendly.

    ‘We are having a humanist ceremony with no religion or tradition attached. This means it can be more relaxed, and we can tailor it to who we are as a couple. We’re getting married in a forest, and having a very informal, relaxed wedding,’ Hayley explains.

    ‘We are going dress shopping together, so the wedding day won’t be the first day he sees the dress. This would have made me really uncomfortable. I want my partner to have a part in such an important decision and be part of that journey. I also won’t be wearing a veil.

    Hayley took her fiance with her to shop for her wedding dress (Picture: Hayley Smith)

    ‘My dad isn’t giving me away. And we aren’t having separate hen and stag parties, we’re going to have a joint celebration before the wedding.’

    The changes are pretty significant, but for Hayley and her fiancé, it was important to start their marriage as they mean to go on.

    ‘Neither of us are traditional and we don’t agree with a lot of the traditions relating to a wedding. We think they are incredibly archaic and quite limiting. We want our personalities and our relationship to shine through on the wedding day so it’s important for us to have a day that is close to our values and ethos as a couple.

    ‘I don’t want it to be all about the bride being given away, and unveiled and kissed, that’s not who I am at all. I want it to be a celebration of love and two people who love each other. I would feel like a huge hypocrite if I had a non-feminist wedding.’

    So why get married at all? Hayley explains that it wasn’t always on the cards.

    ‘It isn’t something we both knew was going to happen. But we felt it was a way to celebrate our love and show each other we are committed to each other. I want to be a part of his family, and he wants to be a part of mine and marriage is a wonderful way to do all of these things.

    ‘I think people are more aware of the outdated traditions now, and even wedding suppliers are creating feminist wedding campaigns to appeal to a new audience.

    ‘It’s millennials now who are getting married, and they are more aware of what weddings and marriage means, and are creating their own traditions and weddings.’

    Weddings means different things to different people. The important thing to remember is that ultimately it’s down to choice. Whether you choose to follow conventions, adapt conventions, or throw the rule book out the window – that’s something for you and your partner to consider.

    In the end, it’s what comes after the wedding that’s probably more important when it comes to feminism and politics – the marriage and how you treat each other in a partnership.

    MORE: Pete Davidson joked about split from Ariana Grande just two weeks before calling off wedding

    MORE: Mrs Hinch and her cleaning obsession is dragging women back to the 1950s

    MORE: Woman quits job and ditches modern life to become a 1950s housewife


    **ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** X mistakes I've already made while planning my wedding - 500 words (Abby)**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** X mistakes I've already made while planning my wedding - 500 words (Abby)nataliemorris88***ILLUSTRATION REQUEST*** Why cancelling my wedding was the best thing that ever happened to me (for May 18th)Why I waited till marriage to have sex (Tola) Marriage couple wedding day church Picture: Dave Anderson for Metro.co.uk**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** X mistakes I've already made while planning my wedding - 500 words (Abby)**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** X mistakes I've already made while planning my wedding - 500 words (Abby)nataliemorris88***ILLUSTRATION REQUEST*** Why cancelling my wedding was the best thing that ever happened to me (for May 18th)Why I waited till marriage to have sex (Tola) Marriage couple wedding day church Picture: Dave Anderson for Metro.co.uk

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    Zitrusfr?chte, Holztisch, Studio
    (Getty Images/Westend61)

    We all know vitamin C can help fight a cold but it turns out eating a piece of a citrus fruit a day could help to fend off more serious illnesses – including cancer and heart disease.

    In their book ‘Eat Better, Live Longer: Understand What Your Body Needs to Stay Healthy’, nutritionists Dr Sarah Brewer and Juliette Kellow say citrus fruits are key for a long life.

    They say we should aim to eat at least one orange, mandarin, satsuma, grapefruits, lemon or lime a day.

    The best way to eat the fruits is raw and at room temperature, as they release more juice when they are warm.

    The pair also claim that the peel contains considerably more antioxidants than the juice, so we should use the grated zest to add flavour to our food.

    Zitrusfr?chte, Holztisch, Studio
    (Picture: lacaosa/Getty Images)

    Including more vitamin C in our diet has various benefits.

    It can be used to make collagen, which helps repair tissues, heal wounds and makes our skin look smoother. The nutritionists point to one study of American women that found high intakes of vitamin C reduced wrinkles by 11 per cent.

    Vitamin C has also been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease – one study of almost 115,000 adults found that people with the highest amounts of citrus fruits in their diet had a 28% reduced risk of stroke.

    Citrus fruits can also help to lower cholesterol levels in humans, though Brewer and Kellow recommend eating the whole orange rather than just the juice as most of the hesperidin, the substance thought to lower cholesterol, is found in the white pith and peel.

    ‘Numerous studies show diets high in citrus fruits protect against many diseases, including cancer, arthritis, heart disease, cataracts, and diabetes.

    ‘The evidence suggests citrus fruits may help reduce the risk of cancer of the oesophagus, mouth, larynx, pharynx, and stomach by 40-50 per cent. The protective nutrients of citrus fruits – fibre, vitamin C, potassium, folate and flavonoids – are located in different parts,’ the nutritionists said.


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