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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    Terrible Facebook frame
    (Picture: @bryonygundy)

    We know it’s hard to avoid Facebook – but would you want the artwork on your walls to pay tribute to it?

    Well, if the answer is yes, we have the perfect thing for you.

    Bryony Gundy posted this picture of a framed poem about the social media network on Twitter.

    She described it as ‘truly one of the worst pieces of home decor I’ve ever seen’ and it seems other Twitter users agree.

    The artwork lists some words that we could associate with Facebook in an acrostic poem, including ‘family & friends’, ‘attitude’, ‘communicate’, ‘exciting’, ‘behave’, ‘oops’, ‘opportunity’ and ‘keep in touch’.

    Bryony said the print is from Homesense and according to the label, it costs £6.99, although the recommended retail price is £13.

    And she inspired others to post some of the interesting pieces they’ve seen in various shops.

    We have contacted Homesense for comment and will update the article accordingly.

    MORE: Eating chocolate could boost men’s sex drives

    MORE: Bride who called off her wedding gives a stranger everything she had booked for the big day

    MORE: Woman becomes friends with the stranger who saved her life with CPR


    Terrible Facebook frameTerrible Facebook framelauraabernethy6Terrible Facebook frameTerrible Facebook frameTerrible Facebook framelauraabernethy6Terrible Facebook frame

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    PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266
    (Picture: Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video)

    Getting as far away from this planet is a nice option sometimes, but not really possible unless you’re an astronaut.

    You can emulate that feeling here on terra firma, though, in this UFO glamping pod.

    Blast off to Templeton in Wales (just north of Tenby) and stay at Spodnic, which is the brainchild of Martin and Carol Anne Johnson.

    PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266
    (Picture: Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video)

    They were featured on Channel 4’s Amazing Spaces with the pod, which sleeps up to four people.

    The pod has a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private hot tub.

    It’s around £110 a night to book, and you can bring your dog as long as it’s kept on a lead in unfenced areas.

    PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: INSIDE OF SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266
    (Picture: Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video)

    You may actually recognise Spodnic, as the structure came from the 2012 Olympics. It was used to house the generator that powered the games.

    After the Olympics, the Johnsons took it back home and made it into the cosy hideaway it is today.

    Martin says of its creation, ‘I was always into sci-fi. I’m of that age where I first remember seeing Stars War come out and watched Doctor Who and Star Trek.

    PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: KITCHEN FOR SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD GUESTS) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266
    (Picture: Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video)

    ‘I was always looking for something different because there are planes out there, helicopters, railway carriages, you name it. I wanted something unique.

    ‘We don’t get that much passing traffic where we are but the electricity board were flying over checking the pylons about half a mile away earlier in the year.

    PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266
    (Picture: Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video)

    ‘Next thing, the helicopter is doing circuits above us because he’d spotted the ‘UFO’ from the air.’

    It’s an interesting juxtapistion, with the spaceship building and futuristic finishings set on a backdrop of the Pembrokeshire countryside and the couple’s many chickens.

    The location – a village called Templeton – is somewhat remote, and there isn’t even a local shop, so bring provisions or ask Martin and Caroline to order in from local producers.

    There is a pub nearby, though, and you can easily head on to a nearby village for more excitement. Failing that, just stay in the gaff and live your space odyssey fantasies.

    MORE: World’s largest peanut is cracked by strong winds

    MORE: Facebook poem print labelled ‘one of the worst pieces of home decor ever’


    Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and VideoKennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and VideojessicacvlPIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: INSIDE OF SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: KITCHEN FOR SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD GUESTS) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and VideoKennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and VideojessicacvlPIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: INSIDE OF SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: KITCHEN FOR SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD GUESTS) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266PIC FROM Kennedy News and Media/ N Lowe Photo and Video (PICTURED: SPODNIC UFO GLAMPING POD ) A sci-fi fan is inviting would-be astronauts to enjoy a night in his UFO glamping pod - so realistic it's prompted helicopters to circle overhead. Former electrician Martin Johnson and his wife Carol Anne built 'Spodnic', a UFO-style pod, using an old shed from the London Olympics. Special features inside the ??110-per-night pod include a rotating double bed, a bunk bed and a pillar heater, while outside, guests also have access to a private jacuzzi. SEE KENNEDY NEWS COPY - 0161 697 4266

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    (Picture: Realisation)

    If you follow anyone in fashion or any influencers on Instagram, chances are you’ll have seen this skirt all over your phone.

    It’s called the Naomi, it’s made by fashion brand Realisation, and let’s face it, we can see why it’s so popular.

    Super flattering (who doesn’t love an elasticated waist?) with an on-trend leopard print, it’s casual enough to wear with a tee and trainers, but could be super smart with heels and a black polo neck.

    (Picture: Realisation)

    If you want to emulate the look you’ve seen all over Instagram, you can order the Naomi for $180 (£138). Sadly it only goes up to a UK size 14.

    If you’re bigger than a 14, or £138 is a bit spenny for you (to be fair, it is silk) then we’ve helpfully rounded up all the other gorgeous leopard print skirts on the market right now.

    (Picture: Realisation)

    They’re the perfect buy right now, while the weather is deeply confusing and can be arctic in the morning but summery in the afternoon, but a leopard print skirt will see you through into the winter, looking just as chic with an over sized knit as it does with a light tee.

    If you’ve already got a leopard print midi and you’re looking for other ways to keep your AW18 wardrobe on point, block colour silk (or silk looking) midis are a great investment. We love this one, this one and this one.

    MORE: ‘Shoplifter stole shirt emblazoned with the slogan “Call my lawyer”‘

    MORE: ‘Mansize’ tissues scrapped by Kleenex because they’re sexist


    nai-fbd6nai-fbd6rebeccacnreidnai-fbd6nai-fbd6rebeccacnreid

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    ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Brown men don’t cry – how a culture of shame stops South Asian men talking about mental health (Rupen Gahir Kalsi)
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Suicide is the number one killer of men under the age of 45 in the UK.

    This is an unacceptable situation but there’s still confusion about what needs to change.

    While the sentiment of encouraging men to talk about their mental health is valuable, it overlooks the reality that many men don’t feel able to share their feelings freely with their support network, and others might not have a support network at all. And that’s where artificial intelligence (AI) is looking to step in.

    According to men’s mental health campaigner and journalist Martin Daubney, AI is a valuable resource in the fight against male suicide.

    Many of us will only have experienced AI, at least consciously, as Alexa, Siri or when using customer service.

    But in this context, it can be a lifeline for men who are unable to share with the people in their lives or who don’t have anyone to share with.

    Research has found that men are much more likely to share their feelings with an AI than a person.

    HARR-e, the early version of a mental health AI, was created by grooming company Harry’s.

    As it stands HARR-e is not a full blown mental-health care bot. It’s an early version of what will hopefully come to fruition. At the moment the primary function of it, as well as giving men a place to put their feelings, is to gather data.

    The plan is that the data will help Harry’s to understand what men really need in terms of mental health care right now.

    Explaining how HARR-e works, Harry’s write:

    ‘HARR-e is a “listening bot”, and via a short survey, we want to find out a bit about you; what gives you a better sense of well-being and which areas in your life heighten anxiety.

    ‘Ai will then compile a detailed snapshot of what British men think about work, relationships, body image, mental health, and anything else that gives you cause for concern. The more you tell it, the more HARR-e will learn.

    ‘We have discovered that men are three times more likely to talk through technology about their intimate, personal issues than humans. Key to that is 100% anonymity – and you get that here. No data about you is ever stored by HARR-e.

    ‘We want to help change the way we listen to men. At this stage we are unable to offer a solution to your problems but hope to use the learnings to determine how, where and even when more advanced Ai could provide mental health support for men.

    ‘After the survey, there’s also a bunch of stuff for you to enjoy: inspiring videos, podcasts and jokes along the way.’

    Discussing the project, Martin Daubney, who is leading the project with Harry’s, told Metro.co.uk: ‘Instead of urging men to talk more, we just need to change the way we listen, and where, and when we do it. Men need a different mental health support network to women, and HARR-e is proving that AI clearly has huge potential to be an important tool in the box.

    ‘The response to HARR-e so far has been amazing. Men are opening up in a genuinely full and frank manner that has blown us away; about intimate mental health matters, work stresses and relationship issues. Crucially, they do this under the veil of 100% anonymity and a lack of fear of being judged.’

    If you’d like to join the discussion, you can do so here.

    If you are struggling with your mental health, please speak to your GP or The Samaritans. 

    MORE: Do you actually care about Brexit or do you just love whinging?

    MORE: Deaf Rave allows people who can’t hear to go out clubbing


    ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Brown men don’t cry – how a culture of shame stops South Asian men talking about mental health (Rupen Gahir Kalsi)ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Brown men don’t cry – how a culture of shame stops South Asian men talking about mental health (Rupen Gahir Kalsi)rebeccacnreidILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Brown men don’t cry – how a culture of shame stops South Asian men talking about mental health (Rupen Gahir Kalsi)ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Brown men don’t cry – how a culture of shame stops South Asian men talking about mental health (Rupen Gahir Kalsi)ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Brown men don’t cry – how a culture of shame stops South Asian men talking about mental health (Rupen Gahir Kalsi)rebeccacnreidILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Brown men don’t cry – how a culture of shame stops South Asian men talking about mental health (Rupen Gahir Kalsi)

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Flu season can start as early as October, which means it’s time for those who need it to get their vaccination.

    This can help prevent vulnerable people contracting flu, which helps stop them getting ill and possibly passing it on to others.

    Although flu doesn’t tend to be deadly, some with weak immune systems have died from the virus, making it extra important to stay protected.

    Here’s everything you need to know about the flu jab?

    Nasal influenza vaccine on a medical tray.

    The flu vaccine is offered to at-risk groups free on the NHS.

    However, as well as older and pregnant people, and those with weak immune systems, it’s urged that children between age 2 and 3 and those at school up to year 5 should also be vaccinated.

    Who gets the flu vaccine on the NHS?

    • Anyone aged 65 and over
    • Pregnant women
    • Children and adults with an underlying health condition (such as long-term heart or respiratory disease)
    • Children and adults with weakened immune systems

    There are three ways the vaccine can be administered.

    The first is via a nasal spray, which is given to children between 2 and 17. This contains a live (but weakened) version of the flu, which doesn’t cause the recipient to get the flu but multiplies and boosts immunity to it.

    The second is a ‘dead’ version of the flu in the form of an injection. This is administered to people between 18 and 65 who have underlying health conditions, or those who are otherwise unable to have the live vaccine.

    It produces a less strong immune response as it is weaker, so boosters may be required. However, it helps protect those who might have an adverse reaction to the live one.

    Both of these protect against four different strains of flu.

    The third is for those 65 and over, and is an injection with adjuvants added. These help boost the immune system alongside the flu dose, which is deemed to be more effective for older people.

    This protects against three strains.

    (Picture: Getty)

    The vaccine is altered yearly to fight newer strains. However, there are no 100% guarantees that you won’t catch the virus even after having the jab.

    It’s the best protection you have, though, if you’re susceptible to catching it, and you should top up your vaccine once a year.

    Regardless of whether you have the vaccine or not, keeping your immune system as strong as possible is advised.

    Wash your hands frequently, and if coughing and sneezing try not to do it into your hands but into the crook of your elbow to prevent the spread of bacteria. Try to eat well and exercise to boost immunity.

    If you do catch flu, symptoms will most likely clear up in about a week. If they persist any longer than this, or you’re in the at-risk group, get in touch with your GP.

    MORE: Meet HARR-e, the online AI taking on the male mental health crisis

    MORE: Deaf Rave allows people who can’t hear to go out clubbing


    Nurse giving flu jab to senior manNurse giving flu jab to senior manjessicacvlNurse giving flu jab to senior manNurse giving flu jab to senior manjessicacvl

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    Multi ethnic group of friends - caucasian and afro american - toasting with beer glasses in the pub. Close up of glasses and hands. Defocused people.
    (Picture: Getty)

    If your dream is to get paid to go to the pub and drink your beer, you’re in luck, because that’s finally a thing.

    Hungry Horse pubs in Chester and Ellesmere Port are looking for customers to drink beer, eat pub grub and watch sports – and they’ll get paid for absolutely all of it.

    The Oaklands in Chester, The Rake in Little Stanney and The Hungry Horse at Cheshire Oaks are all looking for someone to do all of the above for £500. Yes, £500 to drink beer, eat pub food and watch the football. Amazing.

    But there is a catch. Because isn’t there always?

    The pubs are actually looking for a local spokesperson to represent the pub company in return for the money – so whoever lands the job lands the freebies.

    A view of a two pints of Guinness inside J. O'Connell Dublin Pub. On Friday, April 13, 2018, in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
    (Picture: Getty)

    But it’s not a hard job – especially as it includes drinking on the job, eating fish and chips and lasagna, and going to entertainment events, as well as playing darts or doing karaoke.

    The only thing that really makes it a job is that you’ll be required to visit a number of local Hungry Horse pubs to provide feedback and recommendations to help make the pub even better.

    If you think spending your life in the pub for money is your kind of thing, you can apply here, to explain why you should be Hungry Horse’s first ‘Pub-licist’.

    They’re looking for someone who’s a pub quiz pro and knows good pub food. Applications close 13 November.

    The pubs in your area that want to PAY you ?500 to drink beer and watch sport Hungry Horse Pub Ellsemere Port Picture: Google Maps METROGRAB
    (Picture: Google Maps)

    Leanne Mortimer, general manager at the Rake, said: ‘Nothing beats the atmosphere and comradery of a local pub – and it really is the guests who make it such a great place to be.

    ‘We’re searching for a pub fanatic who just loves a trip to their local, to become our first ever Pub-licist and help us to become the best pub the community.

    ‘So, if you fancy taking part in a pub quiz, sipping on a cold beer or tucking into traditional pub classics – all while getting paid to do so, then we want to hear from you. We’d love it if the UK’s first ever Pub-licist was from Cheshire!’

    MORE: Christmas music on repeat could be bad for our mental health

    MORE: Asda is selling white chocolate and salted caramel cheese for £1


    Friends toasting with beer in a pubFriends toasting with beer in a pubhattiegladwellmetroMulti ethnic group of friends - caucasian and afro american - toasting with beer glasses in the pub. Close up of glasses and hands. Defocused people.A view of a two pints of Guinness inside J. O'Connell Dublin Pub. On Friday, April 13, 2018, in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images)The pubs in your area that want to PAY you ?500 to drink beer and watch sport Hungry Horse Pub Ellsemere Port Picture: Google Maps METROGRABFriends toasting with beer in a pubFriends toasting with beer in a pubhattiegladwellmetroMulti ethnic group of friends - caucasian and afro american - toasting with beer glasses in the pub. Close up of glasses and hands. Defocused people.A view of a two pints of Guinness inside J. O'Connell Dublin Pub. On Friday, April 13, 2018, in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images)The pubs in your area that want to PAY you ?500 to drink beer and watch sport Hungry Horse Pub Ellsemere Port Picture: Google Maps METROGRAB

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    A children’s ward at a hospital has been given toy cars so that the kids can drive themselves to surgery.

    The electric cars are being used at a hospital in Leicester, to make the poorly kids’ experiences more positive.

    Children booked in for operations will get to drive the cars through the wards and corridors, straight down to theatre.

    Bosses at the Leicester Royal Infirmary introduced the cars earlier this week.

    Sophia Fagan was one of the first young patients to get behind the wheel and get a test drive.

    The six-year-old from Market Harborough had eight teeth removed on Wednesday, after suffering from painful abscesses.

    The fleet of five cars was provided to the hospital by Volvo retailer, Sturgess Motor Group.

    PIC FROM Caters News - (PICTURED: Local Volvo retailer goes the extra mile to help children get to surgery at Leicester Royal Infirmary by donating electronic vehicles for young patients to travel to the operating theatre.) - Patients at a childrens hospital have been given a new burst of life after a surprise donation by a local Volvo dealership. Sturgess Motor group donated a fleet of electronic vehicles to Leicester Royal Infirmary for young patients to travel to the operating theatre. The new cars were donated to make the operation experience less daunting for patients.SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Caters News)

    Sophia, who says her little red car was ‘tricky’ to control to begin with, was a natural behind the wheel and she drove herself to theatre with a big smile on her face.

    ‘I was excited to drive it and I found it fun,’ she said.

    ‘I was scared about the operation and this made it much better. Hospitals are scary and I was very nervous.’

    The idea to introduce the cars came after nurses wanted to make a trip to the theatre less stressful for youngsters.

    Volvo stepped in and offered this quirky way of transporting children to surgery.

    Sophia’s operation lasted an hour and she is now recovering at home with mum, Samantha Fagan, 37, and her husband, Christoper, 31.

    Hairdresser, Samantha said: ‘It made the whole experience a lot easier for both of us.

    PIC FROM Caters News - (PICTURED: Local Volvo retailer goes the extra mile to help children get to surgery at Leicester Royal Infirmary by donating electronic vehicles for young patients to travel to the operating theatre.) - Patients at a childrens hospital have been given a new burst of life after a surprise donation by a local Volvo dealership. Sturgess Motor group donated a fleet of electronic vehicles to Leicester Royal Infirmary for young patients to travel to the operating theatre. The new cars were donated to make the operation experience less daunting for patients.SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Caters News)

    ‘I think I was more nervous than Sophia was. It was a nice experience and quite funny to watch.

    ‘I enjoyed it and it was comforting to see her smiling.

    ‘It would be great if they could do it with every patient because it really made a difference. She loved it.

    ‘Hospitals can be overwhelming for little ones so it was a great help.’

    Julie Clerc, matron at University Hospitals of Leicester said: ‘Surgery can be an extremely daunting time for most people, let alone a child.

    ‘We do everything we can to make the journey from the ward to the theatre as comfortable as possible but sometimes the experience can unnerve the most confident person.

    ‘We wanted to think of ways that would make the trip more enjoyable for the younger children.’

    Chris Sturgess, chairman of Sturgess Motor Group, added: ‘The children’s hospital at Leicester Royal Infirmary have taken care of members of the Sturgess family, and this was one way we felt that we could give back.

    ‘It was an honour to deliver these five electric cars to the children in an attempt to make their experience less daunting whilst going to the operating theatre.’

    Once the vehicles have had their full MOTs, they will be in full operation and ready to help make children’s journeys to surgery much easier, less daunting experience.

    MORE: A pub wants to pay someone £500 to drink beer, eat food and watch sports

    MORE: Same-sex penguin couple Magic and Sphen are to become parents


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    (Picture: Ainee Fatima)

    A teacher has found herself extremely popular Twitter after sharing a video of herself marking her student’s paper using a meme.

    27-year-old Ainee Fatima teaches at East Leyden High School, Illinois, and is currently teaching high school seniors.

    She had been thinking about using meme stickers to mark her students’ work for a while, because some of their answers were ‘so ridiculous and funny’ that she needed the kids to see the faces she was making.

    She tells Metro.co.uk: ‘I thought, “why not just show them?” So I printed out the Nick Young Meme and the Gordon Ramsay one to keep some positive ones on hand too.’

    Ainee says she loves both of the memes she uses but finds herself making the Nick Young face ‘generally in life’.

    She added: ‘So many people have sent me more memes to add to my sticker collection, it’s been hilarious.’

    So far, Ainee’s tweet has received more than 100,000 retweets and 400,000 likes. She captioned it with: ‘I love grading with my new stickers!’

    Ainee said: ‘I started using memes because of two reasons, it was kind of appropriate for my class which is a Media Studies English class and we study social media, the impact of it, music, movies, politics and pop culture so the meme sharing has been a regular part of my classroom culture for my students.

    ‘Second, I wanted to take the pressure off negative grades and give the students a laugh.’

    According to Ainee, her students love that she marks their work with memes.

    She explained: ‘The kids loved it, they started laughing and those who didn’t receive one asked me if they could have one!’

    However, she’s unsure how their parents have reacted – but she says all of them are super supportive so she’s sure they’ll find it as funny and lighthearted as she does.

    MORE: Sainsbury’s and Asda launch a cheese-filled advent calendar

    MORE: A pub wants to pay someone £500 to drink beer, eat food and watch sports


    Teachers marks papers with memes Picture: METROGRABTeachers marks papers with memes Picture: METROGRABhattiegladwellmetroTeachers marks papers with memes Picture: METROGRABTeachers marks papers with memes Picture: METROGRABhattiegladwellmetro

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    Crocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard style
    (Picture: Crocs)

    Crocs are back, and this time they’re here in slipper form.

    Yes, Crocs, the shoes people only ever wear in the kitchen or to take the bins out (or occasionally at London Fashion Week), are here in the form of slippers and they come in a bunch of fancy colours, including walnut, pepper, candy pink and chambray blue.

    They sound very posh, don’t they?

    Crocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard style
    (Picture: Crocs)

    The Crocs slippers come from the official Crocs website and are available in loads of sizes for £24.99.

    They’ve already had a few very good reviews, and have been dubbed a ‘great house shoe’.

    One person said: ‘First of all, if you are buying these because you want a traditional pair of crocs with some extra warmth, these are not your shoe.

    Crocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard style
    (Picture: Crocs)

    ‘These are house slippers and have a minimal amount of padding between you and the ground. But for me, that’s perfect as I like more of the barefoot feel while still having a little bit of cushion and insulation. I absolutely love these slippers.’

    Another added: ‘Best slippers I ever had’.

    Since their release, the Crocs slippers have also been making their way over to Twitter, where people have admitted they’re also thinking about buying a pair.

    So there we have it, even the internet are keen on the Crocs slippers.

    We might just have to give in and buy a pair ourselves.

    MORE: The ‘it’ skirt you need in your life for autumn 2018

    MORE: Gourmet Burger Kitchen’s claims they sell ‘proper Indian’ food aren’t going down well


    Crocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard styleCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard stylehattiegladwellmetroCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard styleCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard styleCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard styleCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard styleCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard stylehattiegladwellmetroCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard styleCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard styleCrocs now come in horrifying SLIPPER form? and they?re even worse than the standard style

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    Mark Lambert plays rugby for the Harlequins (Picture: Steve Bardens/Getty Images for Harlequins)

    Picture the classic image of the rugby players’ changing-room: large, grizzly blokes preparing for a game, the smell of sweat and muscle rub in the air.

    Some are shouting at the group, others are in quiet contemplation before the war to come, while one or two – overcome with nerves – might have disappeared to the toilets.

    Fast-forward a couple of hours and the same group is celebrating wildly or commiserating solemnly. Their bodies have just gone through the ringer.

    The physical aspects of rugby are well advertised, and without them little would be achieved on the field. If you are not fit, strong, powerful and resilient as an individual, and as a collective, then your successes will be limited.

    But what is not as openly discussed is the mental element associated with this type of team sport; when players – like myself – get injuries and fail to be selected, or face more unseen challenges such as anxiety, anger or problems away from the game.

    There is a stigma attached to mental weakness among men – especially for those who are seen as physically robust –  and there shouldn’t be.

    For professional athletes, there is a constant challenge of striking a balance between everyday life and a career in elite sport, and the sacrifices needed on all sides to make that work.

    That is why I am so proud to be a part of the ‘Man of More Words’ campaign, which urges men to speak up about their mental health.

    The Movember Foundation and Harlequins Foundation has united to stop men dying too young, and a big part of that is the acknowledgement that for many men, being open about their feelings is difficult.

    The effects of that inhibition can be tragic, with more than 800,000 deaths by suicide globally each year, of which 75% are men.

    I have friends in the game who have experienced suicide personally – but what is far more common is issues of anger, anxiety and fear.

    My own challenges came in the shape of dealing with serious injury when I was younger. Twice before the age of 21, I thought I might be facing the end of my career due to serious knee and head injuries.

    This really shook me, as I was just beginning a dream career and with friends away at university, it became a time of isolation and uncertainty.

    It was my family that helped pull me out of that low time, and I will always be grateful for that.

    More recently, at the other end of my career, I have faced the uncertainty of contract issues and the possibility of the game I love being taken away from me before I am ready to leave.

    Fortunately I have built a very strong support network around me, so I always have people I can talk to.

    The flip side is that if I can ever play that role for someone else, I am happy to do so.

    From personal experience, I can appreciate that the load can be lifted by sharing with someone. It is even more powerful when it’s men opening up to each other.

    Bonds formed in sports can be especially strong, because of the shared physical challenges that people go through together.

    Many of my closest friendships have been built through my time in rugby.

    What brought us together was the hard work we went through to build our team. What is really at the core of it though is that we genuinely care about each other.

    This is built through hours spent together on long coach trips or across dinner tables, playing cards and killing time in all the stupid ways you can imagine. That is when you really learn about people.

    We might all look like silverback gorillas but the basis of our relationships is emotion.

    My hope is that the surface level banter of the changing-room or in the bar can turn into conversations that have a really powerful impact on the mental health of men.

    I’ve already seen rugby players such as Joe Marler, Danny Care and Dave Ward open up in a film that we were involved in for World Suicide Prevention Day with Movember, and hopefully this will spread spread through the stands and among fans, so more people feel comfortable open up, too.

    So check in with your friends, listen to how they are doing and let them know you are there for them – you never know the power a conversation can have.

    Talking is something that rugby players, and men in general, tend to be pretty bad at – but it is time to end that stigma.

    I hope rugby can lead the way.

    You can watch members of the Harlequins take part in the Movember Foundation’s ‘Be a Man of More Words’ campaign here

    Need support? Contact the Samaritans

    For emotional support you can call the Samaritans 24-hour helpline on 116 123, email jo@samaritans.org, visit a Samaritans branch in person or go to the Samaritans website.

    MORE: When it comes to suicide prevention – we must be aiming for zero deaths

    MORE: 17 men explain why they were too afraid to seek help for their mental illness

    MORE: We talk sport, mental health and Harlequins on this week’s Mentally Yours


    Harlequins v Scarlets - Anglo-Welsh CupHarlequins v Scarlets - Anglo-Welsh CupallieabgarianHarlequins v Scarlets - Anglo-Welsh CupHarlequins v Scarlets - Anglo-Welsh Cupallieabgarian

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    (Picture: Funko)

    We’re only in October, and shops have already released a bunch of different advent calendars, including ones filled with cheese, and McVitie’s biscuits.

    But if you’re not someone who likes to eat first thing in the morning – and you’re a Harry Potter fan – you’ll be happy to know you can now get a magical advent calendar which comes with 24 Harry Potter themed Funko dolls.

    Funko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)
    (Picture: Funko)

    The advent calendar is going to feature ‘the Wizarding World’s favourite witches, wizards, beasts, ghosts and house elves’, and of course Harry, Ron and Hermione come as little Funkos.

    Funko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)
    (Picture: Funko)

    The product description reads: ‘This Harry Potter advent calendar promises a very jolly Christmas indeed, especially when paired with treacle tart and a mug of hot Butterbeer. Celebrate the season with Harry Potter, Hermione Granger with a time turner, Ron Weasley, and more!

    ‘You never know who you are going to get!’

    Funko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)
    (Picture: Funko)

    And if you fancy it, you could open your Harry Potter advent calendar while snuggled up in one of Molly Weasley’s oversized ugly Christmas jumper.

    Okay, they’re not made by Molly herself but they are currently available in Primark, in navy and blue with Harry and Ron’s initials in a lovely sparkly gold.

    MORE: Colour changing Harry Potter candles will sort you into a Hogwarts house

    MORE: Costa launches new festive cups and Christmas menu


    Count down to Christmas with this magical Harry Potter advent calendarCount down to Christmas with this magical Harry Potter advent calendarhattiegladwellmetroFunko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)Funko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)Funko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)Count down to Christmas with this magical Harry Potter advent calendarCount down to Christmas with this magical Harry Potter advent calendarhattiegladwellmetroFunko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)Funko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)Funko Advent Calendar - Harry Potter (Picture: Funko)

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Diet trends come and go.

    5:2, Dukan, Atkins, South Beach, Mediterranean diet, Keto – they’ve all had their moment in the sun, working for some people and being abandoned by others.

    But now there’s a new kid on the block. The DASH diet.

    DASH stands for dietary attempts to stop hypertension, and as the name suggests, it’s a diet designed to prevent or reverse hypertension.

    Hypertension is another name for having high blood pressure. High blood pressure is dangerous as it puts you at a higher risk of having a heart attack.

    The diet consists of eating mostly fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods; includes meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans.

    (Picture: Getty)

    The DASH diet is limited in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, red meat, and added fats. Which, to be honest, is the same as most diets. If there’s one where you’re allowed to eat all the sugar and processed carbs that you want and still look like a Victoria Secret model, please do let us know.

    On the DASH diet you are still encouraged to watch your calorie intake, sticking to a maximum of 2,000 a day for a woman or 2,500 for a man.

    As well as helping to lower your blood pressure, the DASH diet can help with weight loss, as any balanced, calorie controlled diet can. However, it is not a dramatic weight loss plan such as the ketogenic diet.

    You can find out more about the DASH diet here.

    If you’re thinking of trying to lose a significant amount of weight, you should speak to your GP who will be able to provide support and advice. 


    gettyimages-909077456gettyimages-909077456rebeccacnreidgettyimages-909077456gettyimages-909077456rebeccacnreid

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    Caption: Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (Picture: AP; WireImage; Rex; Getty)

    Meghan Markle is having a ball on her first overseas tour as the Duchess of Sussex if her outfit changes are anything to go by.

    Harry and Meghan are currently on their royal tour of Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga and Meghan has been sailing through it in a variety of stylish, chic and plain gorgeous outfits.

    Oh to be a Duchess.

    In fact, it’s getting us ridiculously excited about Meghan’s maternity wardrobe. Her style is pretty stellar as it is, but we fully expect that her maternity choices will be even more glorious.

    To help us all keep track and refer back to these joyous and stylish times, we’ll be updating this post with every outfit Meghan wears during her trip to Australia. Buckle in.

    DAY ONE:

    Meghan wears a white Karen Gee dress at Admirality House

    Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex attend a welcome ceremony at Admiral House in Sydney by The Governor General Sir Peter Cosgrove and and Lady Cosgrove. Pictured: Prince Harry,the Duke of Sussex Ref: SPL5033573 151018 NON-EXCLUSIVE Picture by: SplashNews.com Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles: 310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 0207 644 7656 Milan: +39 02 4399 8577 Sydney: +61 02 9240 7700 photodesk@splashnews.com World Rights,
    (Picture: Splash News)

    For a visit to the official Sydney residence of the Governor-General of Australia, Peter Cosgrove, and Lady Cosgrove – and her first appearance since announcing her pregnancy – Meghan opted for a sleek white shift dress by Australian designer Karen Gee.

    The dress, known as ‘The Blessed Dress’, promptly sold out and crashed the Karen Gee website. It costs AUD1,800 (£971.99)

    Meghan completed her look with Stuart Weitzman nude suede pumps.

     

    Meghan wears a Brandon Maxwell khaki shirt dress for an afternoon reception

    The Duchess of Sussex attends a reception hosted by the Governor-General at Admiralty House in Sydney on the first day of the Royal couple's visit to Australia. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. Harry and Meghan will take part in 76 engagements in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand over their 16-day trip to the Pacific region. See PA story ROYAL Tour. Photo credit should read: Andrew Parsons/PA Wire
    (Picture: Andrew Parsons/PA Wire)

    Meghan did a quick change for the afternoon reception at Admiralty House, swapping her white shift for a khaki shirt dress by Brandon Maxwell.

    Brandon Maxwell is a favourite of Meghan – she previously wore their design, a yellow shift dress, at the Commonwealth Youth Event in July.

    Just like the white shift, the green khaki dress has already sold out, but we know it cost £1,728. Whew.

    The Duchess accessorised the dress with Dior nude heels and jewellery previously owned by Princess Diana – a bracelet and butterfly earrings.

     

    DAY TWO:

    Meghan goes casual for a visit to Mountain View Farm in Dubbo

    Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex arrive at Dubbo Airport Pictured: Meghan,the Duchess of Sussex Ref: SPL5033939 171018 NON-EXCLUSIVE Picture by: SplashNews.com Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles: 310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 0207 644 7656 Milan: +39 02 4399 8577 Sydney: +61 02 9240 7700 photodesk@splashnews.com World Rights,
    (Picture: Splash News)

    For a rainy visit to the Mountain View Farm in Dubbo, the Duchess of Sussex kept things casual in a shirt, blazer, and jeans.

    The blazer is the creation of Meghan’s pal Serena Williams, from the tennis champion’s Boss collection. It features a red and blue check, has an oversized fit, and costs $145 (£110). Naturally it has already sold out.

    If you’re keen to wear the same jeans as Meghan, you’ll need to head to Outland – she’s wearing their Harriet style in black, which cost £140.

    Mandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9934625bp) Meghan Duchess of Sussex attends a Dubbo community BBQ in Victoria Park Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 17 Oct 2018 The Duke and Duchess travel to Victoria Park to join people from Dubbo and the surrounding areas for a BBQ picnic in the park to celebrate community spirit within the region. His Royal Highness gave an address as well.
    (Picture: Tim Rooke/REX)

    That crisp white shirt is the work of Maison Kitsuné. It’s still in stock through Matches for £192.

    Meghan completed her outfit with J. Crew’s Sadie ankle boots, earrings by Sydney-based designer Natalie Marie, a Natalie Marie initial necklace with the letter M, and the Pascale Monvoisin Cauri necklace.

    She wore her hair in an excellent ponytail.

     

    DAY THREE:

    Meghan wears a blue Dion Lee dress to visit Melbourne

    Image ?Licensed to i-Images Picture Agency. 18/10/2018. Melbourne, Australia. Prince Harry & Meghan Markle Royal Tour-Day Three. Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex accompanied by his wife Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, during a walkabout at Government House in Melbourne, on day three of their tour of Australia. Picture by Andrew Parsons / i-Images
    (Picture: Andrew Parsons / i-Images)

    Arriving in Melbourne, Meghan topped her Folded Sail navy dress by Australia designer Dion Lee (already sold out, of course) with a Martin Grant trench coat.

    Her bag is £850 by Gucci, her navy shoes are Manolo Blahnik, and she’s wearing a gold cuff bracelet by Shaun Leane.

    Those necklaces you can spot were a gift from some children.

    Mandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9936538ac) Meghan Duchess of Sussex Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 18 Oct 2018 Their Royal Highnesses will fly to Melbourne where the day will begin with a short walk to Government House, meeting members of the public along the way in the grounds of the Royal Botanic Gardens, before attending an official Reception at Government House. A diverse group of young Victorian leaders and community members will attend the Reception, including Queen's Young Leader Hunter Johnson, founder of The Man Cave mental health initiative. The Duke and Duchess will also meet representatives from Aubot, Farmwall and F1 in Schools
    (Picture: Tim Rooke/REX)

     

    Then swaps to a Club Monaco dress and flats for a trip to the beach

    Mandatory Credit: Photo by Matt Baron/REX (9936539ah) Meghan Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry at South Melbourne Beach Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Austraila, Day 3, Melbourne - 18 Oct 2018
    (Picture: Matt Baron/REX)

    Honestly, if the Duchess of Sussex had gone to the beach in Manolo Blahniks we would have suspected she’s super-human, so we’re glad she made a quick change to flats.

    While Meghan kept on her trench coats, bag, and jewellery from earlier in the day, for a visit to the beach she swapped her navy dress for a £325 black shift by Club Monaco and traded in heels for the same flats she wore when she arrived in Australia; Rothy’s The Point Black Flats.

    Could this mean ballet-style flats are making a comeback? We hope so.

     

    DAY FOUR:

    Meghan wears a striped Martin Grant maxi dress to Bondi Beach

    SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 19: Meghan, Duchess of Sussex talks to members of OneWave, an awareness group for mental health and wellbeing at South Bondi Beach on October 19, 2018 in Sydney, Australia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on their official 16-day Autumn tour visiting cities in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand. (Photo by Paul Edwards - Pool/Getty Images)
    (Picture: Getty Images)

    Keeping with the beach theme, Meghan wore a striped maxi sundress by Martin Grant  – an Australian label – for day four of the royal tour.

    The dress is still available to buy and will set you back £1,080.

    It’s not the first time she’s worn a Martin grant piece, opting for a trench coat from his collection on day two of the tour.

    AAP via Press Association Images. Britain's Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and his wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex arrive at Bondi Beach, in Sydney, Australia, Friday, October 19, 2018. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on a 3-week tour of Australia, New Zealand, Tonga, and Fiji and are in Sydney to launch the 2018 Invictus Games, an Olympic-style event for disabled and ill service people. (AAP Image/Joel Carrett)
    (Picture: AAP)

    She wore Castañer espadrille wedges, costing £90, with the dress and kept things relatively simply with her hair in a ponytail.

    Mandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9937668dp) Meghan Duchess of Sussex with local surfing community group 'OneWave' on Bondi Beach Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 19 Oct 2018 Their Royal Highnesses meet the founder of OneWave, Grant Trebilco, who shares his own story of how surfing and the ocean inspired him to found OneWave and to spark conversations about mental health.
    Meghan looked beach-ready in her stylish outfit (Picture: Rex Features)

     

    Then switches to a two-toned Roksanda Athena dress for a school visit

    Her second look of the day, for when she and Harry visited a school was a Roksanda Athena dress in navy, costing £1,400, with a blue border.

    She swapped the sandals for Stuart Weitzman The Legend Pumps in being, costing £280, and had changed her ponytail to a soft up-do.

    The Duchess of Sussex during a visit to Macarthur Girls High School in Sydney on the fourth day of Duke and Duchess of Sussex's visit to Australia. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 18, 2018. See PA story ROYAL Tour. Photo credit should read: Phil Noble/PA Wire
    The Duchess of Sussex visits the Macarthur Girls High School in Sydney (Picture: PA)

    Meghan and Harry’s tour kicked off on Tuesday 16 October and will culminate on Wednesday 31 October.

    MORE: Prince Harry berates fan saying ‘you can’t give flowers that big to my wife’

    MORE: Prince Harry and Meghan receive first baby gifts as they kick-start Australia tour


    Meghan Markle outfits compMeghan Markle outfits compamyduncanukmetroPrince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex attend a welcome ceremony at Admiral House in Sydney by The Governor General Sir Peter Cosgrove and and Lady Cosgrove. Pictured: Prince Harry,the Duke of Sussex Ref: SPL5033573 151018 NON-EXCLUSIVE Picture by: SplashNews.com Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles: 310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 0207 644 7656 Milan: +39 02 4399 8577 Sydney: +61 02 9240 7700 photodesk@splashnews.com World Rights,The Duchess of Sussex attends a reception hosted by the Governor-General at Admiralty House in Sydney on the first day of the Royal couple's visit to Australia. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. Harry and Meghan will take part in 76 engagements in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand over their 16-day trip to the Pacific region. See PA story ROYAL Tour. Photo credit should read: Andrew Parsons/PA WirePrince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex arrive at Dubbo Airport Pictured: Meghan,the Duchess of Sussex Ref: SPL5033939 171018 NON-EXCLUSIVE Picture by: SplashNews.com Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles: 310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 0207 644 7656 Milan: +39 02 4399 8577 Sydney: +61 02 9240 7700 photodesk@splashnews.com World Rights,Mandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9934625bp) Meghan Duchess of Sussex attends a Dubbo community BBQ in Victoria Park Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 17 Oct 2018 The Duke and Duchess travel to Victoria Park to join people from Dubbo and the surrounding areas for a BBQ picnic in the park to celebrate community spirit within the region. His Royal Highness gave an address as well.Image ?Licensed to i-Images Picture Agency. 18/10/2018. Melbourne, Australia. Prince Harry & Meghan Markle Royal Tour-Day Three. Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex accompanied by his wife Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, during a walkabout at Government House in Melbourne, on day three of their tour of Australia. Picture by Andrew Parsons / i-ImagesMandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9936538ac) Meghan Duchess of Sussex Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 18 Oct 2018 Their Royal Highnesses will fly to Melbourne where the day will begin with a short walk to Government House, meeting members of the public along the way in the grounds of the Royal Botanic Gardens, before attending an official Reception at Government House. A diverse group of young Victorian leaders and community members will attend the Reception, including Queen's Young Leader Hunter Johnson, founder of The Man Cave mental health initiative. The Duke and Duchess will also meet representatives from Aubot, Farmwall and F1 in SchoolsMandatory Credit: Photo by Matt Baron/REX (9936539ah) Meghan Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry at South Melbourne Beach Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Austraila, Day 3, Melbourne - 18 Oct 2018SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 19: Meghan, Duchess of Sussex talks to members of OneWave, an awareness group for mental health and wellbeing at South Bondi Beach on October 19, 2018 in Sydney, Australia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on their official 16-day Autumn tour visiting cities in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand. (Photo by Paul Edwards - Pool/Getty Images)AAP via Press Association Images. Britain's Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and his wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex arrive at Bondi Beach, in Sydney, Australia, Friday, October 19, 2018. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on a 3-week tour of Australia, New Zealand, Tonga, and Fiji and are in Sydney to launch the 2018 Invictus Games, an Olympic-style event for disabled and ill service people. (AAP Image/Joel Carrett)Mandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9937668dp) Meghan Duchess of Sussex with local surfing community group 'OneWave' on Bondi Beach Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 19 Oct 2018 Their Royal Highnesses meet the founder of OneWave, Grant Trebilco, who shares his own story of how surfing and the ocean inspired him to found OneWave and to spark conversations about mental health.The Duchess of Sussex during a visit to Macarthur Girls High School in Sydney on the fourth day of Duke and Duchess of Sussex's visit to Australia. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 18, 2018. See PA story ROYAL Tour. Photo credit should read: Phil Noble/PA WireMeghan Markle outfits compMeghan Markle outfits compamyduncanukmetroPrince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex attend a welcome ceremony at Admiral House in Sydney by The Governor General Sir Peter Cosgrove and and Lady Cosgrove. Pictured: Prince Harry,the Duke of Sussex Ref: SPL5033573 151018 NON-EXCLUSIVE Picture by: SplashNews.com Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles: 310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 0207 644 7656 Milan: +39 02 4399 8577 Sydney: +61 02 9240 7700 photodesk@splashnews.com World Rights,The Duchess of Sussex attends a reception hosted by the Governor-General at Admiralty House in Sydney on the first day of the Royal couple's visit to Australia. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday October 16, 2018. Harry and Meghan will take part in 76 engagements in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand over their 16-day trip to the Pacific region. See PA story ROYAL Tour. Photo credit should read: Andrew Parsons/PA WirePrince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex arrive at Dubbo Airport Pictured: Meghan,the Duchess of Sussex Ref: SPL5033939 171018 NON-EXCLUSIVE Picture by: SplashNews.com Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles: 310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 0207 644 7656 Milan: +39 02 4399 8577 Sydney: +61 02 9240 7700 photodesk@splashnews.com World Rights,Mandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9934625bp) Meghan Duchess of Sussex attends a Dubbo community BBQ in Victoria Park Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 17 Oct 2018 The Duke and Duchess travel to Victoria Park to join people from Dubbo and the surrounding areas for a BBQ picnic in the park to celebrate community spirit within the region. His Royal Highness gave an address as well.Image ?Licensed to i-Images Picture Agency. 18/10/2018. Melbourne, Australia. Prince Harry & Meghan Markle Royal Tour-Day Three. Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex accompanied by his wife Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, during a walkabout at Government House in Melbourne, on day three of their tour of Australia. Picture by Andrew Parsons / i-ImagesMandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9936538ac) Meghan Duchess of Sussex Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 18 Oct 2018 Their Royal Highnesses will fly to Melbourne where the day will begin with a short walk to Government House, meeting members of the public along the way in the grounds of the Royal Botanic Gardens, before attending an official Reception at Government House. A diverse group of young Victorian leaders and community members will attend the Reception, including Queen's Young Leader Hunter Johnson, founder of The Man Cave mental health initiative. The Duke and Duchess will also meet representatives from Aubot, Farmwall and F1 in SchoolsMandatory Credit: Photo by Matt Baron/REX (9936539ah) Meghan Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry at South Melbourne Beach Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Austraila, Day 3, Melbourne - 18 Oct 2018SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 19: Meghan, Duchess of Sussex talks to members of OneWave, an awareness group for mental health and wellbeing at South Bondi Beach on October 19, 2018 in Sydney, Australia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on their official 16-day Autumn tour visiting cities in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand. (Photo by Paul Edwards - Pool/Getty Images)AAP via Press Association Images. Britain's Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and his wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex arrive at Bondi Beach, in Sydney, Australia, Friday, October 19, 2018. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on a 3-week tour of Australia, New Zealand, Tonga, and Fiji and are in Sydney to launch the 2018 Invictus Games, an Olympic-style event for disabled and ill service people. (AAP Image/Joel Carrett)Mandatory Credit: Photo by Tim Rooke/REX (9937668dp) Meghan Duchess of Sussex with local surfing community group 'OneWave' on Bondi Beach Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex tour of Australia - 19 Oct 2018 Their Royal Highnesses meet the founder of OneWave, Grant Trebilco, who shares his own story of how surfing and the ocean inspired him to found OneWave and to spark conversations about mental health.The Duchess of Sussex during a visit to Macarthur Girls High School in Sydney on the fourth day of Duke and Duchess of Sussex's visit to Australia. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 18, 2018. See PA story ROYAL Tour. Photo credit should read: Phil Noble/PA Wire

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    The hunt for this year’s most romantic couple is still going.

    Photographer Matthew Dippel captured a proposal on his lens, while wandering about in Yosemite Park, a national park in the Sierra Nevada mountains, California.

    The picture, which shows a man kneeling in front of his budding bride at Taft Point (fingers crossed she said yes), caused Twitter frenzy when Dippel asked the world to help him identify the couple, so that he could share his photo with them.

    ‘Twitter help, idk [sic] who these two are but I hope this finds them. I took this at Taft Point at Yosemite National Park, on October 6th, 2018,’ Dippel captioned his tweet.

    He uploaded the picture on 17 October, and as of nine hours ago – despite over 106,000 retweets – the couple still remain a mystery pair.

    Dippel wrote: ‘Update #2: Still no luck. A lot of people saying they found them but doesn’t turn out to be the right couple. If you honestly think you found them message me please! I can’t keep scrolling through the comments to look. Thanks everyone.’

    Meanwhile, within the thread, some people are uploading pics of their own. One user, called ChapsTV, posted a picture of himself in June, doing a handstand dangerously close to the edge of the cliff.

    Others are taking a more humorous view to the search, with one user photoshopping the picture so that it looks as if someone is getting a blowjob.

    Romance is alive, you guys.

    You can see the thread here. If you recognise the couple (or know someone who got engaged in Yosemite Park on 6 October), send me an email at almara.abgarian@metro.co.uk.

    MORE: Retired florist finds marriage proposal note from 1780, hidden in a puzzle purse

    MORE: These real-life proposal stories prove that any proposal can be perfect

    MORE: What to do if a proposal goes wrong


    Proposal-f109Proposal-f109allieabgarianProposal-f109Proposal-f109allieabgarian

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    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Yoga has turned into a bit of a fashion show.

    What began as an ancient spiritual practice to improve the body and mind has turned into a flexibility contest, with fitness influencers showing off their £100 leggings in sponsored posts found in the #YogaEveryDamnDay hashtag.

    It can be off-putting for those of us who aren’t hypermobile/mega-toned/able to afford expensive garms.

    When I first started doing yoga, I lived in Primark kit – you could get an entire outfit for £17 and it did the job just fine.

    It blew my mind that people were out there spending £80 on leggings when you could get a pair for £8. ‘What fools!’ I thought – until years later when I was earning a bit more and decided to treat myself to a pair of leopard print Teeki leggings.

    They were expensive (£60) but Teeki leggings are made from recycled water bottles, have cool prints, and are designed with a panel at the crotch (rather than a camel toe inducing seam), so I assumed that’s what I was paying for.

    Then came the hallowed day I was gifted my first pair of Lululemon leggings – the Lululemon Wunder Under hi-rise 7/8 tight (£78),which were ridiculously comfy, held their shape and moved with me – and suddenly I understood. All these Lululemon d*ckheads I had been making fun of all these years – just like that, I was one of them.

    Turns out I’m not the only one who’s succumbed to a fancy legging: ‘I’ve spent a fortune on some pairs of leggings and also had cheaper ones, but my favourite and go-to pairs are the most expensive,’ says Claire, 32, who’s been practicing hot yoga for over a decade.

    ‘My favourite brand is Onzie, and my fave leggings from there cost the same as two week’s worth of food shopping, but it was worth it.

    ‘It’s like investing in a good pair of trainers if you’re a runner. The fabric sculpts and holds you in which is nice considering you have to stare at yourself for a solid 60 minutes.

    ‘It means they don’t cling to you with the sweat, and you can move freely in them throughout an entire class.’

    So, what makes a £60 pair of leggings different to an £6 pair?

    After years of wearing leggings on all points of the spectrum, I wanted to find out once and for all what difference a hefty price tag has – aside from on your bank balance – and what we should be looking for when buying yoga kit.

    You don’t want that crotch seam splitting (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Fabric

    The fabric you’re looking for in a yoga pant is different to what you’re looking for in a running legging – stretch is way more important when it comes to all those lunges and warriors.

    My favourite yoga leggings ever are the Lululemon Align pant (£88), as they’re super thin (when I’m cycling in them, I sometimes have to glance down and check that I actually remembered to put them on, as I feel naked), incredibly soft, and ridiculously stretchy, while also holding you in. The dream.

    I put my detective hat on to find out why they feel so good. Turns out it’s a four-way stretch. Four-way-what-now?

    Here comes the science – stretch fabrics either have a two-way or a four-way stretch. Two-way stretch means the fabric stretches in one direction, four-way means it stretches in both directions, allowing unrestricted movement.

    Tipping my yoga clothes out onto the floor to tug at the fabrics, I discover that my cheap yet trusty Primark and Forever 21 leggings can only be stretched lengthways, therefore are two-way.

    The more expensive Teeki, Liquido and Lululemon offerings can be stretched lengthways and widthways.

    ‘A higher elastane content in fabric will give additional stretch which is great for particularly dynamic workouts,’ explains Rosie Cook, CEO of swimwwear brand Deakin and Blue.

    ‘The way a fabric feels on your skin is also important e.g. if it’s super soft, so there’s no rubbing or itching.’

    It’s also good to look out for sweat-wicking fabric if you’re into more dynamic forms of yoga – this will draw moisture away from your skin and up to the fabric’s surface, helping it to evaporate, thus making you feel less gross.

    Natural fabrics like cotton retain moisture, so if you’re into sweaty flows – although it goes against your mum’s advice about always choosing natural fibres – you’re better off looking for leggings with sweat-wicking material like polyester/nylon/Lycra blends.

    If you do prefer natural fibres, bamboo fabric is moisture-wicking and anti-bacterial, although it’s not commonly used. You can find bamboo yoga gear at places like Bamboo Clothing, Carrot Banana Peach and Asquith.

    However, remember that even the most expensive leggings won’t eliminate sweat patches – while I adore my khaki Lululemon Align pants, they do give my sweaty crotch away. *shrugs*

    Design

    Sometimes, something as simple as a high waistband can make all the difference to a yoga legging.

    ‘A high waistband won’t roll as you move so won’t need adjusting,’ explains Rosie.

    I have a pair of £18 high-waisted leggings from Forever 21, which have gone a bit baggy and aren’t as flexible as my more expensive pairs, but they stay put because of the higher waistband.

    A lower waistband on cheaper leggings could mean you spend your class worrying about your butt crack instead of being present in balasana – which is good to know.

    My Lululemon and Teeki leggings are designed with a panel in the crotch area, rather than just a seam, which is way more comfortable – and avoids the dreaded camel toe, even when going commando while practicing in hot countries.

    Higher quality leggings will last longer (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Durability

    It’s been three years and I’m still wearing my leopard print Teeki leggings to death – they’ve gone a bit baggy on the legs from intensive wear, but are high-waisted so there’s no issues with them falling down.

    I also still occasionally wear my old cheaper Primark and Forever 21 offerings (it’s nice to switch it up, y’know?) but they definitely lost their shape a lot quicker than my pricier pairs.

    You also don’t want the stitching to come apart at the seams (imagine accidentally exposing your butt to the person behind you during a sun salutation) so make sure you’re getting quality workmanship.

    Long story short –  spending £10 on a pair of leggings is such a false economy if you’re having to replace them every six months.

    Ethics

    When you go out and buy new garms, it’s pretty easy to forget that a real-life human sat and made them –  a real-life human who may get paid less in a month than it cost you to buy the item.

    It became harder to ignore that fact back in April 2013 when the eight-storey Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,100 workers and injuring over 2,500.

    Brands all over the world used that factory, including Primark, Matalan and Mango – brands you probably have in your closet. Meaning that we were all responsible – and still are.

    If Rana Plaza has taught us anything, it’s that we should all be asking more questions about where our clothes come from.

    ‘Brands that pride themselves on their ethical and sustainable credentials will typically reference this on their websites so you can get a feel for why their pricing might be higher than others,’ says Rosie.

    ‘Although, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to work out that if you are paying £5 for your leggings then the person who made them almost certainly isn’t being paid fairly to do so, let alone the conditions they might be having to work in.’

    Primark has an extensive ethics section on their website and were one of the first to hold their hands up and sign the Bangladesh Accord (to regulate fire and building safety) following the tragedy, so don’t assume that a low or high price point equates to ethical standards – do your research.

    The Fashion Revolution movement was set up following the disaster, which calls for a more transparent supply chain in the fashion industry. Its website is a great read if you’re interested in being more ethical when it comes to your wardrobe.

    So, is it worth splashing the cash on fancy leggings?

    Yes, but only if you can afford it, and only if they’re actually fancy – it’s important to remember that a higher price doesn’t necessarily mean you’re ticking all the above boxes.

    A company can buy a load of yoga leggings from a factory and slap a hefty price tag on it, tricking you into thinking you’re buying a luxury product with clever marketing.

    I practiced for years in cheap leggings, which I raved about until I upgraded, so it goes to show that you don’t need spenny garms to do yoga – higher quality ones can just be a bit of a bonus. It’s not like wearing Lululemon automatically means you zen out on a higher plane.

    Do the yoga teachers in Rishikesh flounce around in fancy floral spandex? Exactly.

    We in the West have bastardised the entire practice with our tight tops, branded clothing and garish prints – traditional Indian yogis still wear dhotis (long pieces of fabric wrapped around the waist and legs, then knotted at the waist).

    To be honest, doing yoga in your undies in your bedroom can be just as good as doing it in £100 leggings at a luxe studio, so long as you’re getting what you need out of it.

    However, if you do prefer to wear modern yoga gear, the check out the below for a few suggestions on where to start shopping.

    Namaste, bitches.

    Where to buy yoga leggings on every budget

    Low budget (<£20)

    Primark

    You can always rely on Primark for cool prints at low prices, often as low as £8.

    M&S

    Marks and Spencer sports leggings tend to average around £25, although they do sell cheaper yoga leggings, like these M&S polyester/elastane quick dry leggings (£15).

    There’s also the M&S quick dry yoga bottom (£16) which is super comfy, and a really nice relaxed fit for less dynamic yoga. (Also great for plane journeys.21

    Forever 21

    While Forever 21 do a great range of leggings that average around £18, it’s often a pain in the butt trying to find your size in stock, so be prepared.

     

    Mid budget (£20-£50)

    H&M

    H&M has good workout gear, and leggings tend to average around the £20 mark. Look out for their Conscious range, which uses fabrics made from stuff like recycled polyester.

    Fabletics

    Fabletics sells a ridiculous variety of styles and prints, and leggings average around £40, unless you join as a member, which entitles you to discount.

     

    High budget (>£50)

    Liquido

    These guys do beautifully patterned, colourful leggings with a choice of three fabric technologies, for £60. They don’t repeat patterns, so you’re less likely to bump into someone else at your studio wearing the same loud print. Plus, they’re sweatshop-free.

    Teeki

    Teeki also does ridiculously cool prints for around £60, and they’re made in the US from sustainable or recycled goods.

    The eco brand has a great section on sustainability on its website.

    Lululemon

    Leggings average at £80 but they’re made with quality fabric and design, and will last you ages.

    The Canadian brand has a whole section on their website regarding sustainability and a responsible supply chain, and they support great charities like Ourmala, which offers free yoga to refugees in the UK.

    MORE: How to get into yoga if you're not flexible

    MORE: How to take care of your mental health when travelling alone

    MORE: Why all runners need yoga


    Yoga poses for sexYoga poses for sexlisambowmanYoga poses for sexYoga poses for sexlisambowman

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    MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**
    (Picture: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images)

    A house once owned by a Suffolk-born man who was hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale.

    The £459,000 ($600,000) property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous for having been the home of John Proctor, a victim of the Salem witch trials.

    The 3,910 sq ft home was built in 1638, when it was part of Salem.

    MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**
    (Picture: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images)

    John was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings such as forcing a former servant to touch the ‘Devil’s Book’.

    His life influenced Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film with the same name.

    MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**
    (Picture: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images)

    The property has six bedrooms, and estate agent Joe Cipoletta, from J. Barrett and Co., says it’s ‘a grand example of colonial and American History’ and features ‘period detail with the functionality of today’s needs.’

    The listing adds: ‘Large eat-in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering.

    ‘All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool.’

    MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**
    (Picture: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images)
    MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**
    (Picture: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images)

    John Proctor’s House has been owned by a family for the past three decades, but the owner passed away on 8 October at the age of 90.

    Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: ‘The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that’s what we are in the process of doing.’

    If you’re after a house with horrifying history – or thrilling, depending on your stance on witches – then this is your place.

    MORE: Penthouse with 85ft long entertainment room is selling for £10 million

    MORE: What I Rent: Warren and Jenny, £830 each a month for a flat in Southwark

    MORE: A castle that comes with a lordship title is on the market for £1.2 million


    For Sale: House Owned By Man Hanged In Salem Witch TrialsFor Sale: House Owned By Man Hanged In Salem Witch TrialshattiegladwellmetroMANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the For Sale: House Owned By Man Hanged In Salem Witch TrialsFor Sale: House Owned By Man Hanged In Salem Witch TrialshattiegladwellmetroMANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images Just in time for Halloween... a house owned by a Suffolk-born man hanged for witchcraft has gone on sale. The $600,000 property in Peabody, Massachusetts, is infamous as having been where John Proctor lived, a victim of the Salem witch trials. The 3,910sq-foot home was built in 1638 when it was part of Salem. Proctor, who was brought to America aged three, was a landowner in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, after being accused of wrongdoings including forcing a former servant to touch the "Devil's Book". His life influenced Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in a 1996 film. Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta, of J. Barrett and Co., says the six-bedroom property is "a grand example of Colonial and American History" and features "period detail with the functionality of today's needs." Further description details include: "Large eat in kitchen with plenty of workspace. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering. All the bedrooms offer storage and ample space to relax. Enjoy the summers around your oversized inground pool." John Proctor's House has been owned by a family for the past 30 years, however, the owner died 8 October at the age of 90. Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News: "The Peabody Historical Society is looking to see if they can financially handle it and that's what we are in the process of doing." Where: Peabody, Massachusetts, United States When: 01 Oct 2018 Credit: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images **All usages and enquiries, please contact info@cover-images.com - +44 (0)20 3397 3000MANDATORY CREDIT: J Barrett & Company/Cover Images. Only for use in this story. Editorial Use Only. No stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission**

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    (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

    Apparently, we all have a ‘sausage roll gene’ which helps us choose what to eat from a buffet – and researchers think it could help promote healthy eating.

    A study has found that what we select from the fridge, a buffet or menu is all down to signals in an overlooked part of the brain, which is linked with reward and pleasure.

    This perception had thought to only play a secondary role when humans choose from a selection of food options, but tests have showed that the ventral pallidum in rats fired up when they were presented with their favourite sugary treats.

    Neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins University in the US say their findings could be ‘critical’ to understanding why some dietary options excite us and others don’t.

    The discovery could lead to new treatments which encourage healthy eating and combat the obesity epidemic.

    Two sausage rolls on a wooden surface.
    (Picture: Getty)

    Lead author David Ottenheimer said: ‘We found a region in the brain that reflects our perception of food in a strikingly dominant way. The level of brain activity we saw exceeded our expectations by far.

    ‘Our data suggest that further investigation of ventral pallidum will be critical for understanding how we make decisions about eating.

    ‘If we want to figure out why a food can be exciting in one scenario and disappointing in another, ventral pallidum could be the key.’

    His team wanted to measure how the brain determines what and how much to eat, when someone has several food options with similar nutritional values.

    The process happens very quickly as we move along buffets, browse restaurants menus or glance into the fridge.

    Even when presented with a choice, the dish that’s the favourite will likely be eaten faster and with bigger bites.

    The research team found that when rats were given two similar sugary drinks for several days – their preferred sucrose and the less popular maltodextrin (food additive).

    The ventral pallidum would fire up when the rats realised they were getting what they wanted. But the brain area would became ‘disappointed’ and the rats didn’t lick the treat faster when they realised they were drinking maltodextrin, according to the findings published in the journal, Nature Communications.

    friends, men, women, garden, food, pizza, bread, salad, table, sun
    (Picture: Getty)

    When the scientists repeated the test with the same rats but replaced the sucrose water with plain water, they observed the same neutron activity as when the rodents realised they were drinking maltodextrin.

    These findings suggest the brain area was making context-dependent decisions, zeroing in on the best food option at any given time, according to the researchers.

    Study senior author Professor Patricia Janak said: ‘Because the signaling by ventral pallidum neurons changes immediately when the rat changes his ranking of which flavour is his favourite, we see this response as providing a real-time read-out of what you like best from currently available options.’

    Next on the agenda is for researchers explore if the signalling in the brain area was used to reinforce existing food-seeking actions or used to inform future decisions and bias them towards one food reward over the other.

    In the meantime – sausage roll, anyone?

    MORE: What is the DASH diet and could it work for you?

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    MORE: Your salt probably has plastic in it


    Sausage roll geneSausage roll genehattiegladwellmetroTwo sausage rolls on a wooden surface.friends, men, women, garden, food, pizza, bread, salad, table, sunSausage roll geneSausage roll genehattiegladwellmetroTwo sausage rolls on a wooden surface.friends, men, women, garden, food, pizza, bread, salad, table, sun

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    (Picture: Mercury Press)

    A makeup artist who had enjoyed clear skin for most of her life developed severe acne when she was 21 years old and, out of desperation, used undiluted Dettol to clean her face.

    Ella Gorton, now 25, had only ever experienced the odd spot throughout her teenage years, but while on a girls’ holiday in Mexico in 2014, saw her skin break out.

    With qualifications in skincare, the beautician spent the next two years ‘trying everything’ to get rid of the acne.

    Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job, and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers looking at her.

    At her lowest point, after trying every ointment and antibiotic available, Ella became so desperate that she resorted to washing her face in pure Dettol, before finally accepting a prescription for Roaccutane (a medication used to treat severe acne) in October 2016.

    Despite her fears over using the ‘controversial’ drug, which has been linked to 20 suicides and can have serious psychological and physical side effects, Ella decided it was ‘worth the risk’.

    Ella from Swinton, Greater Manchester, said: ‘I had never suffered from acne, I would just get the odd hormonal spot. Then I was on a girls’ holiday and I started getting these really sore lumps around my mouth.

    ‘I didn’t know what was bringing them up. I thought maybe I was using the wrong sun cream for my skin.

    ‘I think at first I was in denial. I kept telling myself it would eventually clear up, but it just kept getting worse. You never expect to get acne at that age.

    ‘By the time I went to the doctor a few months later, he showed me this chart. There are five stages and I was a stage three.

    ‘I remembered seeing the same chart when I was studying skincare at college and thinking how awful it was. So when the doctor was then showing that chart to me, I was so upset. I just couldn’t believe we were talking about my skin.

    ‘It was extremely painful. I had to learn to sleep on my back because if I slept with my face touching the pillow it would be too sore and sometimes the cysts would burst in the night and cover the pillow with blood.’

    MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons acne started to reduce in redness after she started to take the controversial drug roaccutane) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.
    (Picture: Mercury Press)

    After two courses of the specialised acne medication, she has seen amazing results and is back to her confident self – happily showing off her radiant makeup-free skin.

    The acne really affected her confidence and was also having a detrimental effect on her mental health.

    Ella said: ‘Being a makeup artist and having acne is the worst. I felt like people were looking at me and thinking “she’s not doing my makeup, she can’t even look after her own skin”.

    ‘I would scrub my skin until it bled. I got so desperate I even tried washing my face with pure Dettol, which was so dangerous. It made no difference, nothing did.

    ‘It’s so scary looking back to think I was willing to do absolutely anything.’

    Dettol warns against using the product undiluted, and on its website states it should be used with ‘one capful to half pint of warm water’.

    MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons adult acne lft her in a lot of pain) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.
    (Picture: Mercury Press)

    After visiting her GP in late 2014, Ella was advised she may need to take Roaccutane, also known as Isotretinoin, but decided to try other, milder medications first.

    Over the next two years, she was prescribed various courses of antibiotics and creams but her skin never improved. Once all other options were exhausted, Ella accepted her GP’s referral to hospital to get a prescription for Roaccutane but the wait was going to be lengthy.

    Seeing their daughter’s growing despair, her parents, Megan Gorton, 53, and Craig Gorton, 56, offered to pay for her to see a private dermatologist.

    Just a couple of weeks later, Ella started on her first course of Roaccutane, taking 50mg a day for the next four and a half months.

    While she didn’t experience any of the more serious potential side effects of the drug, Ella did suffer extremely dry lips, dried out hair and nose bleeds.

    But taking such a short course of Roaccutane saw her acne return in October 2017. A second, longer course of the medication, ended in June this year and has worked completely, with Ella now celebrating both Roaccutane and being acne-free.

    ‘When my GP first mentioned Roaccutane in 2014, I really didn’t want to take it. I asked to try all the other options first. I’d only ever heard bad things about it and its links to depression, and I didn’t want to risk it.

    ‘But I spent years trying everything and spending so much money on all these different products.

    ‘Every time I went back to the GP he could see how distressed I was getting and eventually he told me again he thought I should have a referral to the hospital to get Roaccutane and I accepted it.

    ‘I did have a few side effects but nothing too severe. Everyone gets the dry lips and my hair was so dry I never had to wash it – which was quite handy actually.

    ‘I got a few nose bleeds too but I consider myself really lucky that I didn’t get anything too serious.’

    MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gorton, 25, suffered with severe adult acne) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.
    (Picture: Mercury Press)

    ‘My skin got worse before it got better because all the toxins started coming out, but after the first few weeks, the improvements I saw every day were incredible.

    ‘I knew it was a risk doing such a short first course and my acne did start to come back, but I just did a longer course the second time around and now my skin is completely clear.

    ‘I’m so much happier and more confident since my skin has cleared up.’

    Ella says putting makeup on is now a ‘joy’ for her as it doesn’t hurt her anymore.

    She said: ‘I would recommend Roaccutane to anyone suffering with acne. There are risks but they’re so worth it. Looking back now, I wish I’d never hesitated about taking it. I just wasted so much of my time feeling trapped in my own skin.

    Roche, the Swiss health care company that develops Roaccutane, is pleased to hear that Ella had such a positive experience with treating her condition.

    A Roche spokesperson said: ‘More than 17 million patients worldwide have received Roaccutane since it was first introduced in 1982 and we are pleased that Ella had a positive experience using it to treat her condition.

    ‘That said, we understand that patients may be concerned about the possible side effects of any medicine. The association between isotretinoin and depression has been reviewed by regulators and a link has not been proved or disproved.

    ‘It’s also known that severe acne can affect the mood and self-esteem of some sufferers, sometimes leading to depression.

    ‘The information provided with Roaccutane carries a warning that some patients may experience mood changes, including an increase in depression.

    ‘It is important that, before they start taking the medicine, every patient tells their doctor if they are depressed, or if they have felt this way in the past.

    ‘If anyone believes they have suffered a side effect to any Roche medicine they should report it to us directly or to the MHRA via its yellow card system.’

    Consult with your healthcare professional before using medical treatments for serious skincare issues. 

    MORE: Cult Beauty have revealed their best sellers of 2018

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    MORE: BEAUTY BAY launching vegan-friendly and cruelty free cosmetics brand


    MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons bumpy red skin made it difficult and painful to apply make-up) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons bumpy red skin made it difficult and painful to apply make-up) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.hattiegladwellmetroMERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons acne started to reduce in redness after she started to take the controversial drug roaccutane) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons adult acne lft her in a lot of pain) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gorton, 25, suffered with severe adult acne) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons bumpy red skin made it difficult and painful to apply make-up) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons bumpy red skin made it difficult and painful to apply make-up) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.hattiegladwellmetroMERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons acne started to reduce in redness after she started to take the controversial drug roaccutane) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gortons adult acne lft her in a lot of pain) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.MERCURY PRESS 19/10/18 (Pictured: Ella Gorton, 25, suffered with severe adult acne) A makeup artist who enjoyed clear skin all her life until suddenly developing severe adult acne aged 21 became so desperate and insecure that she would wash her face with undiluted Dettol. Ella Gorton, 25, only ever experienced the odd spot throughout puberty and her late teens but during a girls holiday to Mexico in 2014, painful bumps starting emerging around her mouth. The baffled beautician, who also has qualifications in skincare, spent the next two years trying everything and spending fortunes on high-end products to soothe the angry red cysts and pustules covering her once smooth face. Her painful and bumpy skin made Ella so insecure that she felt like people questioned her ability to do her job and she found herself constantly looking at the ground to avoid strangers glares. See Mercury copy.

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    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)

    There’ll be a lot of laundry done in Greater Manchester this evening.

    Earlier today, dogs and their humans descended onto a farmer’s field in Altrincham to take part in the Muddy Dog Challenge – an initiative organised by Battersea Cats and Dogs Home.

    The charity, which is based in London, is running the UK-wide project in six areas including Windsor, Nottingham, Manchester, Peterborough, Cardiff and Tunbridge Wells.

    And it was, as promised, a very muddy affair.

    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)
    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)
    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)
    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)

    The events are being held to raise money for – you guessed it – cats and dogs.

    Depending on which one you go along to, there will be an obstacle course that is either 2.5km or 5km long.

    And for dog owners with precious pooches (or those who love dogs but don’t have one of their own), don’t worry. You can run solo, too.

    ‘The event went superbly, incredibly well organised and great to see so many people taking part. All thanks to the many volunteers scattered about keeping everything in order,’ said Peter Harrop, who wrestled through the mud with his dog Ted.

    ‘We certainly had fun raising money for a fantastic charity.’

    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)
    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)
    (Picture: Dan Rowlands/SWNS.com)

    Because what better way to show your support for your pooch than to dive into mud together.

    Let’s just hope the contestants didn’t wear expensive workout clothes for this one.

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    276851077_Dogs_and_their_owners_take_on_the_muddy_dog_challenge_5K_run_around_a_farmers_field_in_Alt-9a9a276851077_Dogs_and_their_owners_take_on_the_muddy_dog_challenge_5K_run_around_a_farmers_field_in_Alt-9a9aallieabgarian276851077_Dogs_and_their_owners_take_on_the_muddy_dog_challenge_5K_run_around_a_farmers_field_in_Alt-9a9a276851077_Dogs_and_their_owners_take_on_the_muddy_dog_challenge_5K_run_around_a_farmers_field_in_Alt-9a9aallieabgarian

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    (Picture: Anna McInarnay/ Caters News)

    It’s not always easy getting pregnant, but Anna, 35, and Renee McInarnay, 36, a same-sex couple who wanted kids, never thought it would be.

    The pair are now parents, having both undergone IVF treatment, fallen pregnant and given birth just two days apart.

    This despite being told the chance of success was just 38% due to their respective ages, and even lower in Renee’s case – as she has polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    They documented the long, laborious struggle online and have spoken out about the abuse received at the hands of trolls.

    (Picture: Anna McInarnay/ Caters News)
    (Picture: Anna McInarnay/ Caters News)

    The couple, who live in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, US, had almost given up when the news arrived via a phone call, telling them that Anna was pregnant.

    It didn’t end there; Renee, who had only produced one egg for fertilisation, was also with child.

    On Saturday October 13, Emma Reese was born to Renee, weighing 3.23kg (7lb 13oz).

    Anna then gave birth to Avonlea Grace, weighing just slightly less at 3.22kg (7lb 1oz), just two days, seven hours and 48 minutes later.

    (Picture: Anna McInarnay/ Caters News)

    Because of complications, both births were carried out by C-section after long labours.

    The couple have since spoken about how they hope their struggle and against the odds tale can inspire others in similar situations.

    ‘The fortune we have had has laid heavily on our hearts, it’s not lost us that we had this amazing opportunity,’ Anna said to Daily Mail Online.

    ‘We want everyone trying to have a family to know that our hearts are with them. We had an amazing experience where some people struggle for years and years.

    ‘Anyone who wants a family should be able to have a family through any means they can do.’

    MORE: Expecting a baby? Mums share top tips on becoming a parent

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    MORE: Mum with fear of Halloween wants to pay someone to take her kids trick-or-treating


    COUPLE GIVE BIRTH ON SAME DAYCOUPLE GIVE BIRTH ON SAME DAYfranciscogarcia92COUPLE GIVE BIRTH ON SAME DAYCOUPLE GIVE BIRTH ON SAME DAYfranciscogarcia92

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