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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Don’t do it! XX people share their horrifying and cautionary stories of sex with their ex (Bibi Lynch)
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    If you were going to cheat, you probably wouldn’t do it on a Tuesday at 6.23am.

    Nope, instead you’re going to do it at a time when you have the opportunity. When you’ve got an alibi, you’re not stuck in the office, and you’re not so exhausted you’d much rather just have a lie down alone.

    So it makes sense, then, that a new survey has found that the ‘peak time’ for affairs in the UK is 6.45pm on a Friday night.

    We appreciate the specificity.

    The results come from IllicitEncounters, a dating site designed for married people to have affairs – so they know their stuff when it comes to cheating.

    They surveyed 1,000 people and found that the majority carried out their naughty business at 6.45pm on a Friday, using a social night with coworkers as an excuse for where they’d gone.

    It’s thought that peak affair time happens just after people leave work on a Friday night, leaving on time because it’s the start of the weekend. They usually get home by midnight so they don’t arouse suspicion.

    Preferred days for cheating, in order of most popular to least:

    1. Friday
    2. Tuesday
    3. Thursday
    4. Wednesday
    5. Monday
    6. Saturday
    7. Sunday 

    On average, affair-havers were found to see their sidepiece twice a week, with Tuesday night the second most popular night for getting busy.

    And yes, people having affairs do tend to be fairly predictable in when they’ll go and bone, as 64% of those surveyed said they stick to a regular routine for cheating as it’s the best way to cover their tracks. So if your partner is suddenly going out for a late night with the boys every Wednesday, some suspicion might be wise.

    The most common cover-up cheaters use for their extramarital activities is that they’re working late or seeing friends from work, with 92% of those surveyed having used this reason for their absence.

    Top excuses cheaters give for coming home late:

    1. Out with work colleagues
    2. Going to the gym
    3. Seeing an old friend
    4. Being delayed by traffic
    5. Shopping

    The second most popular excuse was going to the gym or doing other exercise, with 74% of adulterers having tried that one, followed by seeing an old friend, being delayed by traffic, and going shopping.

    IllicitEncounters.com spokesman Christian Grant said: ‘What this new research shows is that cheats are creatures of habit.

    ‘They have strict routines which they tend to stick to when they are seeing their lover.

    ‘If your partner regularly goes out with work colleagues on a Friday night, this should raise suspicions, particularly if they always go out with you the following night. The Saturday night date is partly due to guilt over the Friday night liaison.

    ‘Having a regular routine means that cheats can stick to the same script when being asked about their whereabouts – making it less likely their affair is rumbled.’

    20 signs the spark in a relationship has gone:

    • You have little to no sex
    • You don’t cuddle at night
    • You stop saying ‘I love you’
    • You don’t do things together
    • You don’t go on ‘dates’
    • You ‘let yourself go’
    • Sleeping in different rooms/beds
    • You criticise one another over little things
    • You cheated on them/they cheated
    • You don’t hold hands
    • Not paying compliments
    • You don’t cuddle up on the sofa
    • You opt for sleep over sex
    • You stop kissing each other goodbye
    • The thought of having sex with them is revolting
    • You go to bed at different times
    • You don’t ‘try as hard’ to look nice for a night out
    • You stop celebrating anniversaries/special occasions
    • You’d rather go on holiday with your friends than your partner
    • You spend more time on social media than talking to your partner

    MORE: Sex addiction might be more common than you think

    MORE: Apparently using these these words on your dating profile will get you more matches

    MORE: You can blame your mum if your dating life is rubbish


    ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Don’t do it! XX people share their horrifying and cautionary stories of sex with their ex (Bibi Lynch)ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Don’t do it! XX people share their horrifying and cautionary stories of sex with their ex (Bibi Lynch)ellencscottILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Don’t do it! XX people share their horrifying and cautionary stories of sex with their ex (Bibi Lynch)ILLUSTRATION REQUEST: Don’t do it! XX people share their horrifying and cautionary stories of sex with their ex (Bibi Lynch)ellencscott

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    (Picture: Getty)

    There’s nothing quite like a nice cold drink.

    But imagine if you pull the tab on a can and discover there’s almost nothing but air inside.

    And as if that wasn’t disappointing enough, you then find out that it could have been worth up to £11,000.

    That’s what happened to Dani Anders, from Bristol.

    She tweeted this video of her opening the can and pouring out the few drops of liquid inside, tagging @DietCokeGB and @CocaCola_GB.

    She said: ‘I swear I’m not some kind of magician but please can someone with skills in sorcery @CocaCola_GB @DietCokeGB save my #dietcokebreak #becauseicant.’

    The empty cans are created as the result of a rare factory error that means the cans are filled up with just a small amount of liquid.

    They are so rare, they are sold on Ebay for thousands of pounds.

    One, from a seller based in Australia, is on sale for 20,000 Australian dollars (£11,000).

    (Picture: Ebay.co.uk)

    But at least Dani might get a can to replace her empty one.

    Diet Coke responded to her tweet and told her to get in touch with them.

    MORE: Why do people hate vegans?

    MORE: ‘Hustle porn’ is ruining our lives and making us less productive


    Empty Diet Coke canEmpty Diet Coke canlauraabernethy6Empty Diet Coke canEmpty Diet Coke canlauraabernethy6

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    Getting Freaky: Are 'blue balls' real?
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Schooldays were a heady time; Trying to sneak into the back of Ann Summers for your masturbatory education, and hiding crusty tissues in every possible household crevice.

    Although most schools these days have somewhat robust sex-ed curricula when it comes to biology, rules and expectations when it comes to who comes and when are still left out.

    You might have had playground chats or passed notes about these details, often being given incorrect information by a kid who’d watched way too much porn for their age.

    We might be grown adults now, but that misinformation – bluetoothed to us on Sony Ericssons alongside hardstyle remixes – can stick in our minds.

    Perhaps one of the most pervasive ‘facts’ that’s persisted is blue balls: The idea that men, if aroused and not brought to climax, experience severe pain.

    I’m not an owner of a penis or testicles, so I have to take the word of those who are.

    But there’s always that niggle at the back of my mind, wondering whether it’s just a ploy to keep us all going down there, long after lockjaw has taken hold.

    Getting Freaky investigates.

    Karin O’Sullivan, Clinical Lead at sexual health charity FPA told Metro.co.uk that there is truth in the myth:

    ‘Some men can experience discomfort in their genitals if they’re aroused but don’t reach orgasm.

    ‘This is due to a build-up of blood flow to the testicles and penis due to sexual arousal or stimulation. Without orgasm or decreased arousal – when blood flow will be released – it can build up pressure resulting in sensitivity, pain and discomfort.’

    It’s really not a life or death situation though lads, so don’t get your Calvins in a twist if you don’t finish:

    ‘This discomfort can be relieved by orgasm through sex or masturbation, or will subside on its own. Taking a cold shower, thinking of something else to distract you or doing some physical exercise can help.

    ‘However, if pain persists, you should consult a doctor as it could be due to something more serious such as epididymitis (inflammation of the testicles), testicular torsion, or a sexually transmitted infection.’

    But, as many women will likely attest to, the term isn’t just a physiological one, and ties into pressure and guilt when it comes to sex.

    Dr. Marlene Wasserman, clinical sexologist and couples therapist, told us:

    ”Blue Balls’ has been seen in the masculine domain. It conjures up a literal image of a man who has engorged testicles as he has not been able to be orgasm. It is used as a manipulation to women; as in, ‘I need sex else my balls will explode’.

    ‘Many women continue to believe this and will submit to sex even when they are not interested as they do not want their men to explode their balls. Somehow it becomes the responsibility of women to take care of these blue balls … ridiculous!’

    It’s a massively pervasive idea that if you start having sex – or even simply get a man aroused (as if it’s your fault for being a sex god/goddess) – that you have to continue out of a sense of obligation.

    You’re not a captain, duty-bound to go down with their ship. You’re a human being with sexual agency, and can stop sexual encounters whenever you feel uncomfortable.

    In terms of the ‘pain relief’ men can provide themselves, Dr. Wasserman says that it’s not just about finishing yourself off and forgetting it.

    She deals with couples who have spoken about the topic, and believes it’s never just about the act of sex itself:

    ‘If a male client expresses anger about this in my therapy room, I am always concerned about the power dynamics in this couple, and that’s where my interventions will focus.’

    Of course she will refer them to a urologist if their testicles are swollen or signs of testicular cancer or infection, but that’s really not what blue balls are in their basest sense.

    It’s also not just a male issue. Dr. Wasserman believes that a third of women never orgasm, and that they are the ones who experience what may be called blue balls:

    ‘Since 33% of women are pre-orgasmic, they are the ones who end up with ‘blue balls’ – i.e. engorged genitals as they have not yet had an orgasm.

    ‘During partner play, she will begin to get aroused and because it takes her about 20-30 minutes to become orgasmic (and usually needing clitoral stimulation) and it takes him anything between 3-5 minutes to ejaculate. She is left engorged after he has climaxed, and no one speaks to this blue balls situation.’

    The running joke when it comes to straight couples is that men orgasm before women, so perhaps blue labia would be more fitting a term.

    Male or female, though, slight discomfort caused by your partner choosing to halt an interaction, for whatever reason, is not a tool to use against someone.

    Nothing is less sexy than begging or coercing someone to sleep with you, not to mention the fact it’s against the law to do so.

    Your genitals may be sensitive for a few moments, but being a big baby about your ‘need’ to cum is about as seflish as it’s possible to be.

    Watch a Ted Talk, have a revitalising shower, and cook yourself some pad thai. I promise, you’re going to be fine.

    Until next week, freaks.

    MORE: There’s a ‘peak time for cheating’ and it’s coming this Friday

    MORE: At what age are women most fertile?


    Getting Freaky: Are 'blue balls' real?Getting Freaky: Are 'blue balls' real?jessicacvlGetting Freaky: Are 'blue balls' real?Getting Freaky: Are 'blue balls' real?Getting Freaky: Are 'blue balls' real?jessicacvlGetting Freaky: Are 'blue balls' real?

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    (Picture: Deliveroo)

    Fancy a Friday night treat? Well, you can pick up a free gourmet doughnut on your way home tomorrow.

    Doughnut Time and Deliveroo are giving away thousands of the sweet treats from 5pm.

    You can pick one up outside Euston, Waterloo and St. Paul’s stations.

    (Picture: Deliveroo)

    But you better be quick – there’s only 2000 of the bespoke doughnuts available.

    Joe Groves at Deliveroo said ‘We’re so proud to call London our hometown and wanted to treat Londoners to something delicious.

    ‘Deliveroo has delivered millions of meals across the capital since it was set up 5 years ago and we know our customers love to devour a sweet treat at the end of the week.’

    MORE: Woman opens sealed empty Diet Coke can that could have been worth £11,000

    MORE: Why do people hate vegans?


    Doughnut-711cDoughnut-711clauraabernethy6Doughnut-711cDoughnut-711clauraabernethy6

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    (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

    Teddy coats are having a serious moment.

    The name is pretty self-explanatory – they’re made of a super-snuggly, fluffy material that makes you look like a cuddly teddy bear.

    As the temperature plummets, what could be better than being wrapped up like a bear? Now you get to be warm and right on trend.

    Every high street retailer has a version or two of this season’s must-have. The styles range from casual, cropped jackets, to long, luxurious evening coats – so there really is a teddy for every occasion.

    All you have to do is pick your favourite.

    Faux shearling coat, £95.99

    The best Teddy Bear coats for winter Zara
    (Picture: Zara)

    Zara’s dark green number is knee-length and double-breasted for an extra touch of glamour. The autumnal shade make it perfect for the transitioning seasons, and it will do you well as party season approaches.

    Throw it over jeans or team with a cocktail dress and heels for a night out.

    UO green teddy zip-through jacket, £50

    The best Teddy Bear coats for winter Urban Outfitters
    (Picture: Urban Outfitters)

    A more casual option, this jacket is vibrant, fun and ideal for weekend wearing.

    It’s a classic cut with a zip and two handy pockets at the front. Be bold with colour-blocking or mix it with browns for a seriously autumnal vibe.

    Brown leopard print teddy borg bomber, £34.99

    The best Teddy Bear coats for winter New Look
    (Picture: New Look)

    The leopard print resurgence still has some serious legs. We’re going to be rocking animal print well into the new year, so why not mix your trends and tick two boxes in one.

    The bold design makes it a great statement piece to liven up a little black dress for your Christmas party.

    Luxe faux fur coat, £85

    The best Teddy Bear coats for winter Topshop
    (Picture: Topshop)

    If you really want to stand out from the crowd this season, opt for this pastel-coloured teddy. It doesn’t matter how basic your outfit is underneath, throw this coat on and you’ve got yourself a serious look.

    Pastel tones are usually seen in spring and summer, so rocking lilac in December is unexpected, original and pretty damn cool.

    Faux shearling teddy coat, £129

    The best Teddy Bear coats for winter Stories
    (Picture: & Other Stories)

    If you want a classic look that you’ll probably wear for a couple of winters, this brown option is a good choice. Warm, durable and ridiculously cosy, this coat will make you feel like you’re walking around in your duvet.

    Team it with wide-leg corduroy trousers and patent ankle boots.

    Faux shearling coat, £65

    The best Teddy Bear coats for winter Monki
    (Picture: Monki/HIGHMIND.SE)

    This super-fluffy look will make you feel like an ice queen this winter. Cream is tricky, so you have to be careful to not get it instantly filthy – but if you can keep it pristine, it will add a touch of luxury to any winter look.

    It’s also pretty roomy so you can fit your giant jumpers underneath if you really feel the cold.

    MORE: Girl shocked when her PrettyLittleThing jumpsuit arrives completely see-through

    MORE: When is the M&S Christmas advert out and when will it be on TV?

    MORE: The best Black Friday fashion deals for 2018


    The best Teddy Bear coats for winterThe best Teddy Bear coats for winternataliemorris88The best Teddy Bear coats for winter ZaraThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter Urban OutfittersThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter New LookThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter TopshopThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter StoriesThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter MonkiThe best Teddy Bear coats for winterThe best Teddy Bear coats for winternataliemorris88The best Teddy Bear coats for winter ZaraThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter Urban OutfittersThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter New LookThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter TopshopThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter StoriesThe best Teddy Bear coats for winter Monki

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    (Picture: TUI)

    Black Friday, the annual sales bash, is taking place on 23 November and if you’re lucky you might get your hands on some pretty sweet deals.

    Sure it’s nice bagging yourself a shiny new gadget or racking up the Christmas presents, but is it as nice as securing yourself a banger of a holiday?

    If you are looking for a cheap getaway or some winter sun (who isn’t?) then you might want to get on the Tui website (formerly known as Thompson) for some pretty nifty offers.

    Tui has posted a list of trips to the likes of Spain, Portugal, Greece, and more for Britons looking to make some savings for their next trip abroad.

    (Picture: Getty)

    The travel operator’s official Black Friday deals will kickstart on 19 November, but here are a few top bargains currently available online.

    Hotel Flamingo Oasis, Costa Blanca, Spain, five nights all inclusive, including flights, luggage, and airport transfers is on sale for £244 per person while it was previously available for £466pp.

    Five nights all inclusive at the Riu Paraiso Lanzarote Resort, in Lanzarote will cost you £329pp, down from its usual price tag of £481pp.

    A seven nights bed and breakfast at Quinta da Bela Vista, Funchal, Portugal, will cost you £414pp (was £880pp).

    A seven nights bed and breakfast at Skuggi Hotel, Iceland was £961pp but is now on sale for £691.69pp.

    Tui Family Life Bellevue Resort, in Rabac, Croatia which includes seven nights, all-inclusive is £649pp (was £817pp).

    The Tui Sensimar Atlantic Belvedere Resort & Spa, in Kos, Greece, includes five nights half board for £486.76pp (was £752pp).

    There are plenty of other deals available on the TUI website which is being updated as the travel operators slash their prices further which they will continue to do until 26 November.

    (Picture: Getty)

    At one minute past midnight on Monday, 19 November holidaymakers will be able to take advantage of a wide range of deals across TUI UK brands which includes Crystal Ski and Marella Cruises.

    A Tui spokesperson told Metro.co.uk: ‘Details are top secret until midnight on Monday 19 November however holidaymakers can expect deals on some sensational tailor-made experiences in over 80 destinations in 30 countries around the world and five cruise ships sailing under Marella Cruises.

    ‘These good value deals extend from winter sun to summer beach, multi-centre breaks to diverse cruise itineraries.  Deals will be available across all devices – mobile, app, desktop and tablet.’

    TUI will also be surprising every customer who books a holiday by entering them into a free competition to win the cost of their trip back. Entry is automatic for all customers who book a Black Friday deal online or in store.

    So keep your eyes peeled on the website.

    MORE: When do the Argos Black Friday deals start?

    MORE: Morrisons Black Friday deals have already started with a £10 magnum of Prosecco

    MORE: The best Black Friday fashion deals for 2018


    Tropical hotel, TenerifeTropical hotel, Tenerifefaimabakar1Tropical hotel, TenerifeTropical hotel, Tenerifefaimabakar1

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    METRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondon
    (Caption: BXR London/Metro.co.uk)

    Anthony Joshua is a beast of a man, with the physique of a god.

    Towering at 6ft 6, the athlete is shredded beyond belief – you wouldn’t want to be on the wrong end of his fist.

    The unified world heavyweight champion now holds three of the four major championships in boxing. His success is down to his undeniable natural talent, but also his brutal training regime.

    Now you have the chance to train just like Joshua, at the luxury gym in London where he is a major partner.

    BXR, in Marylebone, focuses on form and technique to help you train like an athlete and get the most out of your workout. And it’s not just about boxing. They do offer sparring and skills classes, but there’s also HIIT sessions, strength training and a mobility studio.

    METRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondon
    (Caption: BXR London/Metro.co.uk)

    Joshua documents his fitness journey on Instagram, which never fails to make us feel bad about ourselves. But it also gives us an insight into how elite athletes train.

    From the videos we can gather it involves silly amounts of cardio and inhuman levels of weight training.

     

    View this post on Instagram

     

    Training files 🥊 #AJBXNG

    A post shared by Anthony Joshua (@anthony_joshua) on

    Instagram Photo

    But you don’t have to be an elite boxer to train like one. BXR wants to make it easier for normal people to workout like the professionals. It all starts with form.

    You can have all the enthusiasm in the world, but if you don’t have your form down – you’re never going to reach your fitness potential.

    Sweat by BXR’s new class Form & Focus helps you master the basics to build a strong foundation for your training programme. If you know how to squat, lunge and lift effectively, then you’ll achieve much more in the gym. And you’ll do it safely.

    The class starts with a thorough warm-up, loosening up your tight muscles, rolling out your hamstrings and your glutes, before building up to more dynamic stretches to get the blood pumping.

    Then the work really begins. Let’s just say it really helps if you like leg day.

    METRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondon
    (Caption: BXR London/Metro.co.uk)

    It’s essentially a HIIT class, but the aim is precision, not speed. You work through different exercises in small groups – focussing on one move for six minutes, with rest time, before moving to the next move.

    It burns. It really burns. But the best thing is feeling like you’ve really learned something. I hadn’t realised I had been doing deadlifts wrong before this class. It’s really useful to spend some time making sure the way you work out is actually effective.

    ‘Whether you are a fitness novice, or simply seeking to lift heavier and with more confidence, Form & Focus is here to set the record straight and teach your mind and body the correct methods of training,’ BXR explains on their website.

    ‘Classes are taught by the elite team of Sweat by BXR trainers in a small group environment of just 12 people per session, to ensure coaches can focus with intense precision on each individual, helping to perfect both form and technique.

    ‘Working in groups of three, sessions feature four basic workouts: deadlifts, squats, push and pulls and overhead lifts.

    ‘Suitable for all ages and fitness levels, Form & Focus allows you to concentrate on the areas you wish to specifically target, helping you to take your training to the next level and enhance results.’

    METRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondon
    (Caption: BXR London/Metro.co.uk)

    The interesting thing about BXR is that it operates on a pay-to-train system. So you don’t have to sign up to an expensive membership to get all the benefits.

    Sessions range from £20 – £40, so it’s definitely not cheap, but for that price you do get access to the super-luxurious facilities, which include a steam room and sauna.

    And because you can pay-as-you-go, you can drop in for a pay-day treat. If sweat and pain is your idea of a treat.

    MORE: A low-carb diet could help you lose weight

    MORE: The struggles of working out with black hair

    MORE: Meet the woman dedicated to making activewear for women of all sizes


    Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like himAnthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like himnataliemorris88METRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondonMETRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondonMETRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondonMETRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondonAnthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like himAnthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like himnataliemorris88METRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondonMETRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondonMETRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondonMETRO GRAB - permission gained by reporter from bxrlondon Anthony Joshua has a swanky gym in London where you can learn to train like him bxrlondon

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    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    Sophie worked with the Fertility Centre to document the journeys of people struggling to have children (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)

    IVF is still something we rarely talk about.

    All too often being unable to have children the old fashioned way (having sex, falling pregnant, and popping out some kids) is seen as a failure, something to be kept secret.

    There’s a layer of embarrassment around needing to undergo a tough and invasive procedure to do what’s supposed to be the most natural thing in the world: creating new life.

    And when the IVF procedure doesn’t work, couples are left to cope with the disappointment in silence.

    Sophie Ingleby’s photo series, Seed, is working to break down that silence.

    The photographer documented the IVF journeys of fifteen couples, charting the highs and crushing lows of trying to have a child.

    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    Egg collection normally takes place five weeks into a cycle of IVF. Those weeks have been filled with drugs injected into the body, which can cause mood swings, sleep deprivation, and skin sensitivity (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)

    Out of those fifteen couples, five had a baby from their first cycle of IVF. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer, and three got pregnant from an additional treatment cycle. That leaves a third who are still trying, and still struggling.

    ‘I came up with the idea of SEED Stories when I was observing an egg transfer,’ Sophie tells Metro.co.uk. ‘Patients are shown their embryo on a monitor before it is transferred.

    ‘Many patients take a photo of it on their mobile – potentially their child’s first photographic portrait; but couples having fertility treatment often visualise their child long before this, seeing the potential of each follicle to hold the seed that will form their child.

    ‘I realised how interested patients were in the clinical imagery and that by taking part in the project, I could give images to them that would help them reflect on their experience whether it turned out to be successful or not.

    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    In a natural menstrual cycle, a woman produces one egg. In IVF, the ovaries are stimulated to produce as many as possible to increase the chances of pregnancy (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)

    Sophie worked with the Fertility Centre at Life in Newcastle upon Tyne, with funding from the Arts Council and support from the North East Photography Network, leaving flyers about her idea for the project in the fertility clinic’s waiting room.

    She first spent months shadowing clinic staff and learning about IVF.

    Couples who were interested then got in touch with Sophie, who arranged to take photos of their journey.

    ‘Patients were interested in the project because they wanted to make a difference,’ says Sophie. ‘They wanted to help other couples going through fertility treatment.’

    ‘For the participants, making the decision to take part in the project was making the decision to share their story. However, many wanted to participant but maintain their anonymity – especially men.

    ‘Participants were often suspicious of how photography has been used to represent IVF in the media.’

    Sophie worked to capture photos at each key stage in the treatment cycles, from the ultrasound images to the hours spent waiting, hoping.

    ‘The participants were so open, sharing their experiences and letting me accompany them and listen in,’ Sophie tells us. ‘I heard the good news and the bad news – I felt for them. It was emotional.

    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2% to 1.9% depending on the age of the woman (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)

    ‘It made me appreciate how lucky I have been to have two children. I saw the couples over many months and one couple on different treatment cycles. I was overjoyed when I met their baby boy.

    ‘I didn’t want to make sensationalist work – seeing a couple devastated by the news that there was no heartbeat from their foetus was not the kind of imagery the project was about.

    ‘I wanted to represent the poignancy in a way that was, firstly, unobtrusive and secondly, that more accurately represented the day to day reality of people having fertility treatment.

    ‘When I was capturing the egg collection portraits, I found myself questioning whether I should be there. It is such an intimate moment – full of anticipation, hope and fear. Sometimes the couples hadn’t even told their family what they were going through.

    ‘I have so much respect for the participants – to open up and share something so personal.

    ‘I felt so privileged to hear their stories and share their experience. I think being there validated their experience, not just photographically, but by listening to what they were going through.’

    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    Worldwide, one in six couples report struggles to have children (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)

    From meeting these couples and photographing their journey, Sophie’s biggest lesson was patience.

    She hopes that the images can provide a portrait of the challenges of fertility treatments, and showcase the reality of the emotional journey to try for a child.

    ‘I think it’s important to keep returning to the statistics: especially the success rates. If you are regularly reading stories of celebrities in their 40s getting pregnant then it would be easy to have an unrealistic view of fertility.

    ‘The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2% to 1.9% depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility.

    ‘For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility.

    The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment.

    ‘I think there is gradually becoming a wider appreciation of how difficult it can be to have a baby, helping people to be more sensitive and supportive – whether that is refraining from asking newlyweds when they are going to have a baby or giving a colleague some leeway while she or he is going through fertility treatment.’

    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)
    SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.
    (Picture: Sophie Ingleby)

    Fertility Month

    This story is part of Fertility Month, a month-long series covering all aspects of fertility.

    For the next four weeks, we will be speaking to people at all stages of the fertility journey as well as doctors, lawyers and fertility experts who can shed light on the most important issues.

    If you have a story to tell or a question to ask, please do get in touch at fertilitystories@metro.co.uk.

    Here is a selection of the stories from Fertility Month so far - and you can find all Fertility Month content here.

    MORE: Fertility Month: Why we are talking about fertility this month

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    MORE: Plastic could be affecting your fertility – here’s how and why

    MORE: How hard is it to get pregnant if you have polycystic ovary syndrome?

    MORE: How to get super sperm like the Danish Vikings

    MORE: What it's like to have an eating disorder while you're pregnant

    MORE: Can you get over not having children when you really wanted to have children?


    SEI_38815142-7e2aSEI_38815142-7e2aellencscottSEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEI_38815142-7e2aSEI_38815142-7e2aellencscottSEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.SEED is about the experience of having IVF and the current cultural context for the treatment. Worldwide, 1in 6 couples struggle to become parents. The success rate of IVF varies from 32.2 percent to 1.9 percent depending on the age of the woman (this affects the amount of eggs a woman has) and the cause of infertility. For one in three couples, the issue is male infertility. The project aims to increase awareness and understanding of fertility treatment. The couples who took part in SEED reflect a range of fertility diagnoses and the associated treatments that are now available ??? from IVF (In vitro fertilisation) and ICSI (Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection) to couples using donor sperm and Pre Genetic Diagnosis as part of their treatment. One in four couples become pregnant from their first cycle of IVF. In this project, out of the sixteen couples that took part, five had a baby from their first cycle. Two couples went on to have a baby from a Frozen Embryo Transfer and one couple from their second treatment cycle. The project has been facilitated by the Fertility Clinic at Life, Newcastle upon Tyne; funded by the Arts Council and supported by the North East Photography Network.

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Gluten-free diets are getting more and more popular for people who want to lose weight, but new research has found that they may not actually be that healthy.

    Any weight loss and reduction in tummy pain are due to eating more vegetables and other fibre-rich foods, – rather than cutting out the protein itself – say scientists.

    An increasing number of people are choosing a gluten-free lifestyle – even though they are not allergic to the sticky substance found in cakes and bread.

    Now a study has shown the diet can help modest slimming and combat bloating and discomfort, but most of the benefits may be driven by eating more by replacing wheat, rye and other grains with vegetables, brown rice, corn, oats and quinoa.

    The researchers, whose findings were published in the journal Nature Communications, said this boosts ‘good’ bacteria in the gut that staves off inflammation and illness.

    Senior lead investigator Professor Oluf Pedersen, of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, said: ‘By now we think our study is a wake-up call to the food industry.

    A display of various gluten free and all natural food, including legumes, nuts, rice and more with a No Gluten symbol displayed in the middle.
    (Picture: Getty)

    ‘Gluten-free may not necessarily be the healthy choice many people think it is.’

    For the study, 60 healthy middle-aged Danes were assigned randomly to two eight-week diets – one low in gluten, at 2g a day, and the other high in gluten, at 18g a day.

    They had a break in between of at least eight weeks when they consumed an average 12g of gluten daily.

    In comparison with the high-gluten regime, the low one induced moderate changes in the intestinal microbiome – or gut bacteria – and reduced self-reported bloating.

    But during this the participants ate more dietary fibres – which the researchers think were responsible for the effects.

    Professor Pedersen said: ‘We demonstrate that, in comparison with a high-gluten diet, a low-gluten, fibre-rich diet induces changes in the structure and function of the complex intestinal ecosystem of bacteria, reduces hydrogen exhalation, and leads to improvements in self-reported bloating.

    ‘Moreover, we observed a modest weight loss, likely due to increased body combustion triggered by the altered gut bacterial functions.’

    (Picture: Getty)

    There’s been debate about whether low-gluten diets should be advised for people without coeliac disease – a severe immune response to even tiny amounts.

    Professor Pedersen and colleagues decided they shouldn’t – even though some healthy individuals may prefer it to combat intestinal discomfort or excess body weight.

    He said: ‘More long-term studies are definitely needed before any public health advice can be given to the general population.

    ‘Especially, because we find dietary fibres – not the absence of gluten alone – to be the primary cause of the changes in intestinal discomfort and body weight.

    ‘Most gluten-free food items available on the market today are massively deprived of dietary fibres and natural nutritional ingredients.

    ‘Therefore, there is an obvious need for availability of fibre-enriched, nutritionally high-quality gluten-free food items which are fresh or minimally processed to consumers who prefer a low-gluten diet.

    ‘Such initiatives may turn out to be key for alleviating gastro-intestinal discomfort and in addition to help facilitating weight control in the general population via modification of the gut microbiota.’

    The two diets were balanced in number of calories and nutrients including the same amount of dietary fibres. But the composition of the latter differed markedly.

    Based on their observations of altered food fermentation patterns of the gut bacteria, the researchers said the effects may not be primarily due to reduced intake of gluten.

    A low-gluten diet has previously been proposed to diminish gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome which occur in up to 20 percent of the Western population.

    Last year a US study of more than 110,000 people found a low-gluten diet increased the risk of a heart attack by about 15 per cent.

    MORE: You can get free doughnuts outside underground stations this Friday

    MORE: Woman opens sealed empty Diet Coke can that could have been worth £11,000


    GLUTEN DIET WARNING - Trendy gluten-free diets do help people to love weight - but "may not be healthy"GLUTEN DIET WARNING - Trendy gluten-free diets do help people to love weight - but GLUTEN DIET WARNING - Trendy gluten-free diets do help people to love weight - but "may not be healthy"GLUTEN DIET WARNING - Trendy gluten-free diets do help people to love weight - but "may not be healthy"hattiegladwellmetroA display of various gluten free and all natural food, including legumes, nuts, rice and more with a No Gluten symbol displayed in the middle.

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    'Self-driving cars will lead to more car sex' - what are the rules around having sex in your car?
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)
    metro illustrations
    ‘Self-driving cars will lead to more car sex’ – what are the rules around having sex in your car?

    A new study has found that we’ll all probably be having sex in driverless cars in the next 20 years.

    An article – in the journal Annals of Tourism Research – looked at how autonomous vehicles will change the landscape of our cities, and one thing is clear: We’ll be shagging.

    The authors, Debbie Hopkins from the University of Oxford and Scott Cohen from the University of Surrey, believe this will be a ‘growing phenomenon’ and that we’ll see a rise in sex tourism, as people opt to have sex in moving cars without the need to actually drive or be spied on by a driver.

    They even surmise that there may be industries akin to ‘Amsterdam’s red light district on the move’.

    It doesn’t seem like a totally crazy thought, given that 49% of Brits have already had sex in a car, and every teen in America has some sort of ‘makeout point’ car park where they spend their formative years tonguing in a Cadillac.

    There will, of course, be other things we’re doing in driverless cars, including sleeping and eating, and hotels and restaurants are more than likely to emerge in these futuristic motors.

    The cars in question will drive themselves, so why shouldn’t we? Will there be any rules around what we do in the cars, even if they belong to us? Will there be road safety implications if we’re too busy having sex to notice potential dangers?

    It’s important to note first and foremost that modesty laws won’t change. You could still be arrested for indecent exposure, public lewdness, or gross indecency if anyone sees you.

    So tinted windows would be a must if you want road head or road sex.

    Similarly, laws around sex work will stay the same whether you’re in a moving car or a hotel or a home.

    Could these be the new shag-pads on the go? (Picture: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

    In terms of when this will take place, Stuart Masson, editor of Car Expert says it’ll likely not be until networked autonomous cars are something we all have. He told Metro.co.uk:

    ‘The default programming will be to stop if there’s any risk, so if a pedestrian steps off a kerb without looking, an autonomous car is more likely to see the pedestrian and stop, rather than swerve or toot a horn.

    ‘Predicting the consequences of AI behaviour is always difficult, but it’s likely that crashes between driverless cars and other road users are unlikely to the the AI’s fault. If anything, we are likely to see other drivers taking advantage of the driverless cars’ caution (pushing in, cutting them off, etc.) by assuming that the computer will stop rather than risk a crash.

    ‘Essentially, you’ll be able to play chicken with an autonomous car because it will always yield…

    ‘Obviously cost will be an issue, as this technology won’t be available on your average Ford Fiesta for a long time yet, but its entirely likely that we’ll see wealthier car owners enjoying the eating/sleeping/sex opportunities of driverless cars as soon as they become available.’

    In terms of danger, the risk won’t be very high, since the algorithms will do all the paying attention.

    Steve Horton, Director of Communication at Road Safety GB told us:

    ‘As and when driverless cars are a reality across the whole travelling public – and by that I mean every car has the same driverless control, then I guess ‘drivers’ and occupants can engage in any activity they choose.

    ‘It’s when drivers do these things AND have to control the vehicle when the real problems start. We think we can multi task but the reality is we take driving for granted and the other activity dominates our attention. Doing anything whilst controlling a large, heavy object means we are not in full control of what is basically a lethal weapon.’

    So, until such time as we have these vehicles en mass, you’re best to avoid having any sort of sexual contact in a moving vehicle.

    This would constitute dangerous driving, and there would be serious legal ramifications

    If leather seats and the smell of pine air freshener are right up your street, though, be sure to park in a Public Sex Environment.

    These are usually in woods, parks, unlit car parks, and areas that make it hard for anyone to see you if it’s dark.

    They’re managed by the police in the sense that there are checks people are consenting and safe, but you won’t be committing a crime by having a quickie in your Corsa.

    You can find these on various dogging and public sex websites, or make a freedom of information request via your local police like this person did.

    Again, you will still be subject to indecency laws, so there is some nuance in how private you need to keep things.

    Essentially, if you have sex at night in an empty location, it’s unlikely you’ll be taken away in handcuffs (at least not in the negative sense).

    If you head down to your supermarket car park and begin going at it, however, you will be caught and charged with breaking the modesty laws listed above.

    No orgasm is worth jail, tbh.

    MORE: Getting Freaky: Are ‘blue balls’ real?

    MORE: There’s a ‘peak time for cheating’ and it’s coming this Friday


    ella byworth car-sex-6ad3ella byworth car-sex-6ad3jessicacvl'Self-driving cars will lead to more car sex' - what are the rules around having sex in your car?ella byworth car-sex-6ad3ella byworth car-sex-6ad3jessicacvl'Self-driving cars will lead to more car sex' - what are the rules around having sex in your car?

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    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Running is great. It clears your head, gets you fit and is super accessible.

    All you need is a pair of trainers and a stretch of road, it doesn’t cost you a thing and you can do it all year-round. It’s no wonder it’s fast becoming the most popular way to exercise in the UK.

    But if you’re a new starter it can be hard to know just how much you should be doing. It can be tempting to think, ‘the more, the better’, but is that true? How often should you actually be running every week?

    The simple answer is that it depends on your experience and your goals. If you’re brand new to running you might want to start at two runs per week, whereas a veteran marathon enthusiast might choose to run nearly every day.

    Tips for new runners

    1. It’s not how fast you go, it’s how you cross the finish line. So when you first start out don’t focus on speed or distance. Focus on the time spent on your feet. Don’t try and run a marathon on day one, run-walking is a great place to start and as the confidence rises the walking will decrease and the running segments will get longer.
    2. Once you’ve fallen in love with running and it’s become something you look forward to, invest in a good pair of running shoes. Try as many pairs as you can and don’t just settle for what you are told to buy in the shop.
    3. Water is your best friend when you start running so hydrate throughout the day.
    4. Embrace a stretching or movement practice that helps lengthen and soothe tight and tired muscles. A weekly session of Yoga can be a great compliment to your new running life.
    5. Be accountable for your training. Take a piece of paper and write a honest letter to yourself about why you want to run and what running means to you. Ask yourself how you will feel when race day comes and you finally cross that finish line. When training gets hard and the enthusiasm begins to falter you can reference this letter for a reminder of why you started.

    Charlie Dark, founder Run Dem Crew 

    If you’re just starting out it’s best to ease into it and build up your tolerance. Running seven days a week when your body isn’t used to it will likely increase your risk of injury and, ultimately, slow your progress down.

    Also, you don’t just want to stick to running. If you’re really want to be a better runner, you need to throw some strength and conditioning training into the mix – that will help get your body in the best shape to really optimise your performance.

    So it’s crucial to mix it up. Vary your run route, how long you run for and the intensity. And make sure you’re keeping a note of your progress.

    Founder of community running movement Run Dem Crew, Charlie Dark, thinks that getting in to running is an intensely individual process.

    ‘Going for a run shouldn’t be a punishment, it should be something you look forward to,’ Charlie tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘Although I’m all for using trackers and apps, I tell my runners not to get to obsessed with the numbers. If it makes you feel good then you will do it more often – until going for a run will feel as natural as brushing your teeth.

    ‘Run as little or as much as makes you feel good inside.’

    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Once you’ve nailed the basics, three runs per week, complemented by conditioning and crucial rest days, would be a great place to start.

    Running on alternate days is a great way to ensure that you give your body rest days, and allow your muscles to recover properly before pounding the pavement again.

    The benefits of running are vast and varied, but there are some potential risk factors. Particularly if you’re doing too much. Dr. Clare Morrison of MedExpress, says you need to really careful of over-training.

    ‘Running is a fantastic form of exercise, however doing it too often can put a strain on your health in a number of ways,’ Dr. Morrison tells us.

    ‘The first is muscle loss. During endurance running your body becomes catabolic, which means you produce higher amounts of the hormone cortisol and experience drops in testosterone levels, which causes your body to burn off muscle.

    ‘Aching joints is also a health problem which is quite common with runners. Most runners experience issues such as shin splints, knee pain, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. Many of these injuries can be prevented with joint supports and proper running shoes.

    ‘Having regular days off from running and steadily increasing speed, rather than heading straight into a sprint can help prevent joint aches. Too much running could also potentially have adverse effects on your heart.’

    Running after injury

    If you have suffered with an injury, you should wait around six weeks to four months before you can run again, in extreme cases it could take as long as a year.

    Once you start running again you should ideally build up the distance and intensity of your runs rather than diving straight in. Before you can run, you must be able to power-walk without pain, this will help determine whether the injured bone can handle the impact of running.

    When you can walk steadily without pain for around 40 minutes, you should be able to try running in small amounts. You should ideally be running only every third day or every other day to give your bones, ligaments and muscles time to get use to the impact and stresses of running.

    Dr. Clare Morrison, MedExpress

    Ultimately, there are no set guidelines about exactly how often you should run or how many miles you should be doing per week. You have to listen to your body.

    Running frequently will improve your endurance, fitness and help you run for longer – so if you’re serious about being a runner, or working toward an even like a half-marathon, make sure you draw up a weekly schedule and stick to it.

    MORE: Anthony Joshua’s fancy London gym will help you train like a pro

    MORE: A low-carb diet could help you lose weight

    MORE: Could getting electric muscle stimulation be a more effective way to work out?


    How running helps my general anxiety disorder (Lousie via The Mix, on email)How running helps my general anxiety disorder (Lousie via The Mix, on email)nataliemorris88metro illustrationsHow running helps my general anxiety disorder (Lousie via The Mix, on email)How running helps my general anxiety disorder (Lousie via The Mix, on email)nataliemorris88metro illustrations

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    Instagram Photo

    Beauty Bay have delighted beauty addicts once again with their Black Friday offering of up to 30% off across the ENTIRE SITE.

    Following on from the success of last year’s Black Friday sale, mega beauty retailer Beauty Bay have over 7,000 products up for grabs from the very best UK and sought-after international brands including ZOEVA, Ofra, Violet Voss and Mario Badescu will be available at a fraction of the full price.

    thumbnail for post ID 8142557You can stay in 450 B&Bs across the world for free by doing chores

    And if that wasn’t already enough to tempt you to spend your entire pay cheque, during the Black Friday sale Beauty Bay will be adding new deals on specific brands.

    We suggest creating a Beauty Bay wish list ahead of time so you can avoid the sales frenzy and missing out on your faves.

    To save you time trawling Beauty Bay’s page upon page of beauty products, we’ve rounded up some of the best deals for you to help you bag a bargain before they’re gone.

    Rose Golden Vol. 2 Luxury Brush Set by ZOEVA, £45.50 WAS £65.00

     Rose Golden Vol. 2 Luxury Brush Set by ZOEVA
    Rose Golden Vol. 2 Luxury Brush Set by ZOEVA (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    There’s £19.50 off this rose gold Zoeva brush set.

    The eight essential brushes have beautiful powder nude handles, rose gold ferrules and a mix of fluffy natural and synthetic bristles. Not only will they look great on your vanity, they will help buff and blend your foundation, concealer and powder to perfection.

    Rose Golden Vol. 2 Luxury Brush Set by ZOEVA, £45.50 (was £65.00)

     

    On The Glow Palette by Ofra, £77.00 WAS £110.00

    On The Glow Palette by Ofra
    On The Glow Palette by Ofra (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    Beauty Bay is offering a whopping £33 off Ofra’s On The Glow Palette.

    This versatile palette includes three full spectrum highlighters, two bronzers and one blush and bronzer trio to help give a lit-from-within glow.

    On The Glow Palette by Ofra, £77.00 (was £110.00)

     

    Brilliant Skin Purifying Pink Clay Mask by Sand & Sky, £27.65 WAS £39.50

    Brilliant Skin Purifying Pink Clay Mask by Sand & Sky
    Brilliant Skin Purifying Pink Clay Mask by Sand & Sky (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    Get £11.85 off Australia’s best-selling face mask Sand & Sky Brilliant Purifying Pink Clay Mask. This clay based, Insta-famous mask, will cleanse and detoxify your skin, leaving it prepped and preened for the party season.

    Brilliant Skin Purifying Pink Clay Mask by Sand & Sky, £27.65 (was £39.50)

     

    Serum Foundation SPF 15 by The Ordinary, £4.60 WAS £5.75

    Serum Foundation SPF 15 by The Ordinary
    Serum Foundation SPF 15 by The Ordinary (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    Grab Holly Willoughby’s favourite Serum Foundation by The Ordinary right here and save £1.15.

    This lightweight, medium coverage serum is available in 21 shades and is suitable for all skin tones.

    Whats more, it’s weightless, smooth and creates a semi-matte flawless finish.

    Serum Foundation SPF 15 by The Ordinary, £4.60 (was £5.75)

     

    Revolution Conceal And Define Concealer, £2.79 WAS £4.00

    Revolution Conceal And Define Concealer
    Revolution Conceal And Define Concealer (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    Save £1.21 on Makeup Revolution’s viral £4 concealer.

    It’s not surprising makeup addicts when made for this concealer as it has the most insane, full-coverage finish yet it’s not cake-y and is under a fiver.

    Revolution Conceal And Define Concealer, £2.79 (was £4.00)

     

    Drying Lotion by Mario Badescu, £11.19 WAS £16.00

    Drying Lotion by Mario Badescu
    Drying Lotion by Mario Badescu (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    Save £4.81 off Mario Badescu best-selling Drying Lotion.

    Formulated with Salicylic Acid, this solution is a great one to have in your stash for busting those pesky blemishes.

    Drying Lotion by Mario Badescu, £11.19 (was £16.00)

     

    Oshun Palette by OPV Beauty, £20.30 WAS £29.00

    Oshun Palette by OPV Beauty (Picture: Beauty Bay)
    Oshun Palette by OPV Beauty (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    Get the Oshun Palette by OPV Beauty right here and save £8.70.

    Just because temperatures are cooling, doesn’t mean your eye makeup has to. The Oshun Palette is full of scorched shades with orange-y undertones – perfect for blue-eyed babes.

    Oshun Palette by OPV Beauty, £20.30 (was £29.00)

     

    Spa Brush Cleaning Mat by Sigma Beauty, £17.47 WAS £24.95

    Spa Brush Cleaning Mat by Sigma Beauty
    Spa Brush Cleaning Mat by Sigma Beauty (Picture: Beauty Bay)

    Save £7.48 and have your makeup brushes like new with this Spa Brush Cleaning Mat.

    We all know the importance of cleaning our makeup brushes, but let’s be honest, it can be a hard task. But this Sigma Beauty Brush Cleaning Mat, although simple is seriously effective at helping to seep away makeup, oil, and impurities from bristles.

    Spa Brush Cleaning Mat by Sigma Beauty, £17.47 (was £24.95)

    Time to stock up on your favourites beautyholics. You can shop up to 30% online at Beauty Bay here.

    MORE: Black Friday deals are available at Tui if you’re looking for a quick getaway

    MORE: When does Game Black Friday start and what are the current deals?


    bbay-carnival-header-e1511033489409-a9b5bbay-carnival-header-e1511033489409-a9b5emilyknott17 Rose Golden Vol. 2 Luxury Brush Set by ZOEVAOn The Glow Palette by OfraBrilliant Skin Purifying Pink Clay Mask by Sand & SkySerum Foundation SPF 15 by The OrdinaryRevolution Conceal And Define ConcealerDrying Lotion by Mario BadescuOshun Palette by OPV Beauty (Picture: Beauty Bay)Spa Brush Cleaning Mat by Sigma Beautybbay-carnival-header-e1511033489409-a9b5bbay-carnival-header-e1511033489409-a9b5emilyknott17 Rose Golden Vol. 2 Luxury Brush Set by ZOEVAOn The Glow Palette by OfraBrilliant Skin Purifying Pink Clay Mask by Sand & SkySerum Foundation SPF 15 by The OrdinaryRevolution Conceal And Define ConcealerDrying Lotion by Mario BadescuOshun Palette by OPV Beauty (Picture: Beauty Bay)Spa Brush Cleaning Mat by Sigma Beauty

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    (Picture: Barterweek.com)

    November might be unseasonably warm this year but we could do with a bit more sunshine.

    A trip abroad seems like a good option right about now.

    But with Christmas coming up, funds are tight.

    Well, next week is barter week, which means you can stay at over 450 B&Bs across the world for free.

    From 19-25 November, you can offer to do a manual, teaching or creative task or even bring something from home to stay in one of the B&Bs, rather than paying the normal rate.

    You can browse the 450 B&Bs in over 60 countries on Barterweek.com.

    The site dedicated to the event is uploaded with entries of the B&Bs ready to open their doors for the barter scheme – by country – and each contains a host wish list, in other words what is being requested in exchange for the free hospitality.

    Once you select the B&B you are interested in and you are able to meet any of the requests posted, just contact the hosts using the appropriate form, start bargaining and when you have come to an agreement, start packing and conclude the barter when you arrive.

    If there is no wish list, the traveller is free to offer a barter of their own, for instance tango lessons or a collectors item of some sort.

    The event is a spinoff of the annual Settimana del Baratto in Italy.

    Some of the businesses even offer to honour your offer outside of Barter Week.

    Let’s take a look at some of the places you can stay.

    Il Palagetto Guest House, Florence, Italy

    If you can offer social media skills, a guided tour of Ireland, origami lessons for children or street art style decoration, you could have a three day stay in this luxurious guest house.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    Il Ghiro, Carloforte, Italy

    The owners of this guesthouse are open to barter offers.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    1720 Quinta da Cancela, Guimaraes, Portugal

    Carpentry, stone masonary and landscaping skills are needed to stay here.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    Ferrieha Farmhouse B&B, Qala, Malta

    If you can create a website or a piece of art, you can stay at this B&B in Malta, complete with a swimming pool.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    Ur-Alde, San Sebastián, Spain

    The owners of this B&B in Spain are open to accepting a variety of skills in return for a stay.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    The Crown, Aldbourne, United Kingdom

    If you don’t fancy going abroad and can offer decorating skills, pub furniture, accommodation for a skiing holiday or horse back riding, you can stay at this property in Devon.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    BnB Varen, Varen, Switzerland

    You can stay here in return for translation skills, graphic design skills, general housekeeping or helping in the garden.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    La maison Blanche aux Volets Bleus, Crédin, France

    The owners of this B&B in France are looking for tips on cooking and how to make the best pizza.

    (Picture: Barter Week)

    MORE: Self-driving cars will ‘lead to more car sex’ – what are the rules around car sex?

    MORE: Photo series captures the hope and disappointment of going through IVF


    Stay for free in 450 places across the world by doing choresStay for free in 450 places across the world by doing choreslauraabernethy6Stay for free in 450 places across the world by doing choresStay for free in 450 places across the world by doing choreslauraabernethy6

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    (backgrounds have been changed) Credit: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Gonorrhoea is coming.

    This particular STI is on the rise, and, even scarier, gonorrhoea is turning into super gonorrhoea, as it’s becoming untreatable and antibiotic-resistant. Great.

    Since 2008, rates of gonorrhoea have increased rapidly, with a bump of 7.5% from 2014 to 2015. It’s most common in young people, with a rate of 26.9% among the 20 to 24 age group.

    The good news is that last week a newly developed antibiotic pill was found to be effective in treating gonorrhoea, so there’s a glimmer of hope for us all.

    The bad news: Gonorrhoea is tricky in that it can quickly become resistant to antibiotics, so if this one doesn’t end up working there’s cause for concern.

    The best treatment is prevention, which is why having safe sex is so important.

    But if prevention doesn’t work, the next best thing is catching an STI early before it worsens and you have the opportunity to spread it to others.

    In the interests of early detection, it’s definitely worth knowing the symptoms. But what’s even more important is going for regular sexual health checks even if you’re symptom-free.

    Around half of women and one in ten men with genital gonorrhoea don’t have any signs or symptoms, and those who do see signs of the infection tend to only experience them weeks or months after they first come into contact with gonorrhoea, when the infection spreads to other parts of the body.

    You can have a test done immediately after having sex, but may need a follow-up two weeks afterwards.

    So, the one thing to take away from this article, before you proceed: Get regular sexual health checks even if you have no symptoms. 

    If you, however, notice any of the below symptoms, they may indicate gonorrhoea.

    Symptoms of gonorrhoea:

    In female genitals:

    • Changes to vaginal discharge, which might be thin, watery, yellow, or green
    • Pain when urinating
    • Lower abdominal pain
    • Bleeding between periods
    • Heavier periods – including for those who are using hormonal contraception

    In male genitals:

    • Unusual discharge from the tip of the penis – the discharge may be white, yellow, or green
    • Pain when urinating
    • Pain or tenderness in the testicles

    In other parts of the body:

    • Gonorrhoea in the rectum may cause anal pain or discharge
    • Gonorrhoea in the eyes can cause pain, swelling, irritation, and discharge

    If you notice any of those symptoms, go to a sexual health clinic or speak to your GP as soon as possible.

    A test will usually involve taking a urine sample and using a swab inside the vagina or around the entrance of the urethra.

    If you’re found to have gonorrhoea, you’ll be treated with antibiotics, usually as an injection and a single dose of tablets. Symptoms should ease two or three days after treatment.

    Three weeks after finishing your treatment, it’s a good idea to have a follow-up test to make sure you’ve got the all-clear. Remember, gonorrhoea isn’t a ‘once and you’re done’ infection – you can catch it again.

    Left untreated, gonorrhoea can spread to other reproductive organs and, in women, can cause pelvic inflammatory disease. This can lead to pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy.

    In men, untreated gonorrhoea can reduce fertility and cause pain in the testicles.

    So as we mentioned, please do get checked.

    MORE: Getting Freaky: Are ‘blue balls’ real?

    MORE: Serious issues with contraception are being ignored, says new study

    MORE: What the BDSM community can teach us about consent


    Masturbation routinesMasturbation routinesellencscott(backgrounds have been changed) Credit: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.ukMasturbation routinesMasturbation routinesellencscott(backgrounds have been changed) Credit: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk

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    (Picture: SWNS)

    A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling on eBay for £16. Yes, £16 for a packet of crisps that has been sat there for 26 years.

    The antiquated packet of cheese and onion, found behind a kitchen cupboard, has a best before date of November 7 1992.

    ‘We found them behind the kitchen units as we’re having a refurb,’ explained crisp archaeologist Damian Connop.

    ‘They look immaculate considering their age. I couldn’t find any information about them, just that they were around in the 80s and 90s.’

    The item’s condition is confusingly listed as: ‘New: A brand-new, unused, unopened and undamaged item.’

    The 26-year-old packet of cheese and onion crisps - SELLING ON EBAY FOR ?26!See SWNS story SWBRcrisps.A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling on eBay - for ?16.The antiquated packet of cheese and onion, found behind a kitchen cupboard, sports a best before date of November 7 1992 - the year John Major became Prime Minister. The item's condition is confusingly listed as; ?New: A brand-new, unused, unopened and undamaged item.? However, eating this particular snack is not recommend, the seller described the packet of Primes Cheese and Onion as an ?archive piece?.
    (Picture: Damian Connop/SWNS.COM)

    Of course, given how old the crisps are, anybody who buys them shouldn’t actually eat them. The packet is for anyone who likes memorabilia, really – with the listing describing the packet of Primes Cheese and Onion as an ‘archive piece’.

    The listing reads: ‘Get your piece of pub snack history with an unopened packet of Primes’ Cheese & Onion crisps, sporting an expiry date of 7 November 1992.

    ‘Date of manufacture is unclear but in excellent condition considering their 26 years behind a kitchen cupboard! Archive piece, not for consumption. Collection available from Park Street, Bristol.’

    Proceeds from the auction will go to One25, a Bristol charity helping women to break free from street sex work, addiction and other life-controlling issues.

    MORE: Gluten-free diets aren’t as healthy as you think, study finds

    MORE: Why do people hate vegans?


    NINETIES NIBBLES - A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling for ?16 on eBay.NINETIES NIBBLES - A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling for ?16 on eBay.hattiegladwellmetroThe 26-year-old packet of cheese and onion crisps - SELLING ON EBAY FOR ?26!See SWNS story SWBRcrisps.A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling on eBay - for ?16.The antiquated packet of cheese and onion, found behind a kitchen cupboard, sports a best before date of November 7 1992 - the year John Major became Prime Minister. The item's condition is confusingly listed as; ?New: A brand-new, unused, unopened and undamaged item.? However, eating this particular snack is not recommend, the seller described the packet of Primes Cheese and Onion as an ?archive piece?.NINETIES NIBBLES - A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling for ?16 on eBay.NINETIES NIBBLES - A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling for ?16 on eBay.hattiegladwellmetroThe 26-year-old packet of cheese and onion crisps - SELLING ON EBAY FOR ?26!See SWNS story SWBRcrisps.A 26-year-old packet of crisps is selling on eBay - for ?16.The antiquated packet of cheese and onion, found behind a kitchen cupboard, sports a best before date of November 7 1992 - the year John Major became Prime Minister. The item's condition is confusingly listed as; ?New: A brand-new, unused, unopened and undamaged item.? However, eating this particular snack is not recommend, the seller described the packet of Primes Cheese and Onion as an ?archive piece?.

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    (Picture: Twitter)

    If you thought colouring your hair ‘unnatural’ colours like blue, pink, or red was just self-expression then you were wrong.

    That’s according to a man on Twitter, anyway, who has been likening women with coloured hair to animals who change colours to show how dangerous they are.

    Alexander J.A Coates, a self-described trainer, writer, and speaker shared his thoughts on Twitter, saying that women who bleach and dye their hair certain hues are signalling their mental state; that they are unhinged and ‘advertising their toxicity and lethality’.

    In a viral thread, he wrote: ‘Animals like poison arrow frogs, venomous snakes, they have bright colors and it lets other animals know to stay away from messing with them. When you see a woman with red, blue, green, purple or rainbow hair, its a sign of mental illness and derangement.’

    His post has 3,000 likes and was supported by other men, though most people reacted with sarcasm and disbelief.

    Alexander compared women changing their natural hair to the phenomenon of aposematism in which animals put up defences such as toxicity, foul taste or smell, sharp spines, or aggressive nature to make it difficult for their predators to eat them.

    His contempt for groovy hair, mostly rainbow, isn’t for women who opt for a natural look like blonde or brunette, however, he just doesn’t have time for ‘Manhater blue or Ihaveamentaldisease pink’, he revealed.

    He demonstrated his point further by using the fictional character of Harley Quinn, saying: ‘She’s more attractive than your typical unnaturally hair colored social justice warrior chick. But would you want to date this girl? She’s literally homicidal.’

    Though many laughed at his claims, his thoughts are unfortunately not new nor alone. Many men have used social media to share their disdain for vibrant hairstyles.

    While some generalised their personal experiences with women with brightly coloured hair (warning people to stay away from such vixens), others tried to tell women that it’s not what men find attractive.

    Naturally, people argued against such statements, saying that women don’t live to serve the male gaze.

    ‘Maybe she thinks her rainbow hair is attractive and isn’t concerned with how a man will see it….maybe everything isn’t about men,’ wrote one woman in response to the tweet.

    The claims that women changing their hair is like aposematism are unfounded as animals use this trick to ward off predators, not the opposite sex, unless Alexander is in fact claiming men are predators.

    If these claims are true and coloured hair does keep away predators then we – meaning men and women – might all do well to run to our nearest salon now. Or pop into Boots after work.

    Anyway, here’s our lifestyle editor getting a fabulous dye job done.

    We’ve contacted Alexander for a comment on this topic but he is yet to reply. We will update the article if he does.

    MORE: It is not a woman’s responsibility to make a man a better human being

    MORE: Stranger helps white adoptive mum to style her black daughter’s hair

    MORE: Boots have revealed their top beauty gifts for Christmas 2018


    Pink hair manga style girl grimacingPink hair manga style girl grimacingfaimabakar1Pink hair manga style girl grimacingPink hair manga style girl grimacingfaimabakar1

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    A hairdresser was filmed giving her client a stunning rainbow coloured look using a paint roller, and the results are amazing.

    37-year-old Kelly O’Leary created the hairstyle by dipping rollers normally used for decorating a house into different dyes.

    The stylist, who runs the Sapphire Hair Lounge in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, then applied the dye to strands of 32-year-old model Amanda Legris’ hair.

    Mesmerising footage shows a hairdresser giving a client rainbow hair using a PAINT ROLLER. See SWNS story SWNYcolor; A hairdresser who gives a client rainbow hair using a PAINT ROLLER. Kelly O'Leary, 37, created the colorful look by dipping rollers normally used for decorating into different dyes. The stylist, who runs the Sapphire Hair Lounge in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, then applied the dye to strands of 32-year-old model Amanda Legris's hair. The end result is an eye-popping blend of orange, purple, pink, blue, green, red and yellow. A clip of the transformation has been watched more than 100,000 times on Instagram. Kelly, a color specialist of 20 years, said: "I do a lot of stage shows so I am always trying to come up with new and interesting techniques. "My model Amanda lets me use her hair a lot, and I really appreciate how she has complete faith in me. "I just went down to our local dollar store and picked up the rollers and the trays. "The paint rollers take up a lot of space so I wouldn?t say they are for everyday use, but it did work quite well. "I also have tried a sponging technique which works a lot better. It is way more practical." Kelly first tested the experimental technique during a hair exhibition in the summer. While Kelly doesn?t plan to introduce paint rollers into her salon?s daily routine, the hair stylist said she would be happy to pull them out for anyone who asked in advance. Kelly said: "When I put it on Instagram, everyone was really excited. "If someone wrote to me and asked, I definitely would be down for doing it. I?d just have to be prepared in advance.
    (Picture: Kelly O’Leary / SWNS.com)

    The end result is an eye-popping blend of orange, purple, pink, blue, green, red and yellow.

    A clip of the transformation has been watched more than 100,000 times on Instagram.

    Kelly, a colour specialist of 20 years, said: ‘I do a lot of stage shows so I am always trying to come up with new and interesting techniques.

    After result of paint rolling. See SWNS story SWNYcolor; A hairdresser who gives a client rainbow hair using a PAINT ROLLER. Kelly O'Leary, 37, created the colorful look by dipping rollers normally used for decorating into different dyes. The stylist, who runs the Sapphire Hair Lounge in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, then applied the dye to strands of 32-year-old model Amanda Legris's hair. The end result is an eye-popping blend of orange, purple, pink, blue, green, red and yellow. A clip of the transformation has been watched more than 100,000 times on Instagram. Kelly, a color specialist of 20 years, said: "I do a lot of stage shows so I am always trying to come up with new and interesting techniques. "My model Amanda lets me use her hair a lot, and I really appreciate how she has complete faith in me. "I just went down to our local dollar store and picked up the rollers and the trays. "The paint rollers take up a lot of space so I wouldn?t say they are for everyday use, but it did work quite well. "I also have tried a sponging technique which works a lot better. It is way more practical." Kelly first tested the experimental technique during a hair exhibition in the summer. While Kelly doesn?t plan to introduce paint rollers into her salon?s daily routine, the hair stylist said she would be happy to pull them out for anyone who asked in advance. Kelly said: "When I put it on Instagram, everyone was really excited. "If someone wrote to me and asked, I definitely would be down for doing it. I?d just have to be prepared in advance.
    (Picture: Kelly O’Leary / SWNS.com)

    ‘My model Amanda lets me use her hair a lot, and I really appreciate how she has complete faith in me.

    ‘I just went down to our local dollar store and picked up the rollers and the trays.

    ‘The paint rollers take up a lot of space so I wouldn’t say they are for everyday use, but it did work quite well.

    After result of paint rolling. See SWNS story SWNYcolor; A hairdresser who gives a client rainbow hair using a PAINT ROLLER. Kelly O'Leary, 37, created the colorful look by dipping rollers normally used for decorating into different dyes. The stylist, who runs the Sapphire Hair Lounge in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, then applied the dye to strands of 32-year-old model Amanda Legris's hair. The end result is an eye-popping blend of orange, purple, pink, blue, green, red and yellow. A clip of the transformation has been watched more than 100,000 times on Instagram. Kelly, a color specialist of 20 years, said: "I do a lot of stage shows so I am always trying to come up with new and interesting techniques. "My model Amanda lets me use her hair a lot, and I really appreciate how she has complete faith in me. "I just went down to our local dollar store and picked up the rollers and the trays. "The paint rollers take up a lot of space so I wouldn?t say they are for everyday use, but it did work quite well. "I also have tried a sponging technique which works a lot better. It is way more practical." Kelly first tested the experimental technique during a hair exhibition in the summer. While Kelly doesn?t plan to introduce paint rollers into her salon?s daily routine, the hair stylist said she would be happy to pull them out for anyone who asked in advance. Kelly said: "When I put it on Instagram, everyone was really excited. "If someone wrote to me and asked, I definitely would be down for doing it. I?d just have to be prepared in advance.
    (Picture: Kelly O’Leary / SWNS.com)

    ‘I also have tried a sponging technique which works a lot better. It is way more practical.’

    Kelly first tested the experimental technique during a hair exhibition in the summer.

    While she doesn’t plan to introduce paint rollers into her salon’s daily routine, the hair stylist said she would be happy to pull them out for anyone who asked in advance.

    Kelly said: ‘When I put it on Instagram, everyone was really excited.

    ‘If someone wrote to me and asked, I definitely would be down for doing it. I’d just have to be prepared in advance.’

    MORE: Men’s bathrooms must come with changing tables if we are to see parental equality

    MORE: 10 best bath oils and salts for Christmas 2018


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    (Picture: REX/Shutterstock/Stella McCartney)

    You would have had to be far away if you missed out on all the royal wedding chat earlier on in the year.

    Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s holy matrimony had us all awwing as we watched the royal couple tie the knot on live television.

    Meghan’s dresses were certainly talk of the town, with Givenchy – her main dressmaker – seeing search results spike, as well as her halter neck Stella McCartney piece that she wore to the wedding reception.

    And now the latter designer has launched her own bridal collection which includes Meghan’s famous evening gown.

    Stella McCartney launches her bridal collection - and there's the halter-neck gown that Meghan Markle made famous Stella McCartney
    (Picture: Stella McCartney)
    Introducing bridal by Stella McCartney
    (Picture: Stella McCartney)

    The British designer has launched an inclusive new line for all ages.

    As well as Meghan’s dress the collection includes includes a wedding suit inspired by the one Bianca Jagger famously wore on her wedding to Mick Jagger.

    And unlike Meghan you won’t need to stitch on your something old to the dress as each look comes with a blue tag that has a personal message from Stella to represent something blue and something new.

    ‘”Made with Love” is a 17-piece bridal collection reimagining wedding dressing for the modern woman; a new perspective on the traditional that is effortless, confident and naturally sexy, made with signature Stella attitude,’ it explains on the Stella McCartney website.

    Introducing bridal by Stella McCartney
    (Picture: Stella McCartney)

    ‘It’s something that I feel very passionately about and is very close to my heart. I think that in this day and age the wedding day is something very different to how it’s traditionally perceived, and I think that the house of Stella McCartney really represents something a little more effortless.’

    Every piece was made in Italy across factories in Puglia, Abruzzo and Marche, made with an environmentally-friendly ethos as garments were crafted using sustainable viscose and updates on traditional couture fabrics.

    Prices range between £675 and £4,300 and in-store appointments can be made online.

    Introducing bridal by Stella McCartney
    (Picture: Stella McCartney)

    MORE: Bride and cross-dressing groom wear matching white dresses at their Vegas wedding

    MORE: Bride shares story of mother in law accidentally texting her about ‘sh*tshow’ wedding dress fitting

    MORE: Man performs the ultimate act of love by proposing with a Greggs Festive Bake


    Meghan Harry Stella McCartneyMeghan Harry Stella McCartneyfaimabakar1Stella McCartney launches her bridal collection - and there's the halter-neck gown that Meghan Markle made famous Stella McCartneyIntroducing bridal by Stella McCartneyIntroducing bridal by Stella McCartneyIntroducing bridal by Stella McCartneyMeghan Harry Stella McCartneyMeghan Harry Stella McCartneyfaimabakar1Stella McCartney launches her bridal collection - and there's the halter-neck gown that Meghan Markle made famous Stella McCartneyIntroducing bridal by Stella McCartneyIntroducing bridal by Stella McCartneyIntroducing bridal by Stella McCartney

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    The image of Suffragette Hilda Burkitt will be on display until 14 December (Photo: Helen Marshall)

    If you visit Birmingham New Street Station today, you won’t fail to see a 200 metre-square photo mosaic revealing the face of Suffragette Hilda Burkitt, commemorating 100 years of women’s right to vote.

    Her image is made up of more than 3,700 crowd-sourced photos and selfies of inspirational women and girls (who identify as female or non-binary), combined with hundreds of historical images focused on women’s suffrage in the early 1900s.

    I have been overwhelmed by the incredible care people have taken in submitting their photos and stories.

    They include narratives of loss and love, of honouring mothers and friends, even oneself.

    And as my daughter comes of age and pursues her own dreams, I look back at my fight, as well the many women who have fought to get to where they are today.

    I can never be in their shoes, but I can be a bridge to express their story.

    Amy Milanian submitted a self-portrait with her newborn baby – she had eight miscarriages before seeing this baby to full term.

    ‘I have been overwhelmed by the incredible care people have taken in submitting their photos and stories.’ (Photo: Helen Marshall)

    Lauren Pountney-Barnes submitted a picture of her great-grandma ‘Nanny Jean’ who was a dancer before war broke out.

    Jean brought up four children alone while her husband served in the RAF, yet still passed on her passion for dance – Lauren is now training to be a ballet dancer and at 98, Nanny Jean is alive and well.

    Luby Cunningham’s image features her daughters. They have been campaigning against and challenging stalking and harassment policies in various institutions, and attended the Women’s March in London this year ‘to honour the Suffragettes and everything they fought for, and the importance of continuing their voice: to challenge inequality and injustice.’

    This artwork marks not just a pivotal historic moment in time for women, but is a personal statement and marker for me and I have strong personal reasons for creating it.

    Years ago, I was a young, single parent compelled to make a living from making art and nothing else, struggling to make ends meet and be a good mother.

    I have taken on challenges that many women face and I am where I am now because of hard graft and determination.

    Women have to be so much to so many people, and still have to work extremely hard to realise their dreams.

    Some of the images sent in by the public that make up The Face of Suffrage (Photo: Helen Marshall)

    This is one of the reasons I chose Hilda Burkitt for the final image. We are familiar with the Pankhursts but I wanted to uncover a brave and daring story that many may be afraid to tell – one that many people may never have heard of before.

    Hilda was convicted of willfully damaging a railway carriage: she threw a stone and broke a window in the last carriage of Prime Minister Herbert Asquith’s train as it pulled out of Birmingham New Street station on his return from a men-only budget meeting.

    She was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment and became the first Suffragette to be force fed – in total, a staggering 292 times whilst incarcerated.

    She, and many like her, were on the front line of the movement. They were working class, desperate, and many were ostracised by their friends and families for what they were doing – they were not the women with placards and petticoats depicted by much mainstream media.

    In this artwork, Hilda looks us right in the eye and reminds us that what we take for granted today only happened, in historical eras, yesterday.

    The Suffragettes sacrificed so much for us, endured extreme treatment, and fought for equal pay, and property, custody and marriage rights – things most of us take for granted today.

    Perhaps the most important aspect of creating this piece has been the coming together of women past and present. I can never be in their shoes, but I can be a bridge to express their story.

    I hope that the image is a positive force for good, will encourage people to learn more about the movement and helps us look forward as well as remembering our history, and reflects the spirit of the suffrage movement full circle.

    The Face of Suffrage, co-produced by GRAIN, will remain in place until 14 December, the date women first voted in the UK. For more information, visit thepeoplespicture.com

    MORE: It is not a woman’s responsibility to make a man a better human being

    MORE: 100 years of votes for women: These are the female heroes who led the suffrage movement

    MORE: Women can now join the SAS and all other military Special Forces


    2018-11-15 04.04.12 - Copy-623e2018-11-15 04.04.12 - Copy-623ermve862018-11-15 04.04.12 - Copy-623e2018-11-15 04.04.12 - Copy-623ermve86

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    (Picture:PA Wire)

    Amazon do not tend to hold back in the torrent of deals they offer up around Black Friday and this year is going to be no different.

    The retail giant is not officially starting their offers until Friday 16 November, but that has not stopped them sneaking a few early deals out

    thumbnail for post ID 8143955Amazon Black Friday deals start tonight but there are early offers on now

    Once they kick off properly on Friday, we will be getting daily deals all the way through to the actual Black Friday on 23 November – and then a few more till Cyber Monday.

    But for you early birds looking to catch a cheap worm or two, here are the deals you can get hold of now.

    Amazon boxes are seen stacked for delivery in the Manhattan borough of New York City, January 29, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo - TM3ECAR1GLA01
    (Picture: REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo)

    Amazon Echo Plus with built-in smart home hub

    Was 139.99. Now £89.99 and free delivery – available here.

    (Picture: Amazon)

    Nespresso EN550.BM Lattissima Touch Automatic Coffee Machine

    Was £279.99. Now £149.00 and free delivery – available here.

    (Picture: Amazon)

    iRobot Roomba 981 Robot Vacuum Cleaner

    Was £899.00. Now £699.99 and free delivery.

    (Picture: Amazon)

    Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 VE 9.7 Inch Wi-Fi Tablet

    Was £399.99. Now £249.99 and free delivery – available here.

    (Picture: Amazon)

    There are plenty more Early Black Friday Deals available here, although there are no details as to when they run out so be sure to check the prices before making the purchase.

    The deals could disappear as quickly as they came. Happy shopping!

    MORE: Early Xbox Black Friday deals offer up to 70% off games

    MORE: Why has the Bitcoin price crashed? Crypto markets slump ahead of ‘hard fork’


    Amazon-b1b5Amazon-b1b5philhaigh26Amazon boxes are seen stacked for delivery in the Manhattan borough of New York City, January 29, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo - TM3ECAR1GLA01Amazon-b1b5Amazon-b1b5philhaigh26Amazon boxes are seen stacked for delivery in the Manhattan borough of New York City, January 29, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo - TM3ECAR1GLA01

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