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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

older | 1 | .... | 1516 | 1517 | (Page 1518) | 1519 | 1520 | .... | 1850 | newer

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    I just wanted to know what was happening to me – what was happening to Tracey (Photo: Metro.co.uk)

    It all started four years ago when I noticed something about me just wasn’t right.

    I was in my early 50s, and was struggling to remember things that had always been so familiar.

    It was this pattern of forgetting things that were never usually a problem for me to remember – as well as feeling anxious and confused – that made me go to the doctors.

    I just wanted to know what was happening to me – what was happening to Tracey.

    At first I was told it could be depression, but the anti-depressants didn’t work. Then I was told it was most likely the menopause, but Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) also didn’t work.

    It was only when my symptoms kept getting worse that I started to push for it to be checked out further – to explore whether it could be dementia.

    My doctor did some basic memory tests and referred me to the memory clinic where two years of visits, cognitive tests and brain scans commenced.

    I felt like due to my age, nobody believed me. Yet simple things that I knew and trusted myself to do were changing.

    It was difficult to make sense of what was happening to me and I started to feel unreliable. This wasn’t just ‘forgetfulness’. I knew it wasn’t.

    I felt like due to my age, nobody believed me. Yet simple things that I knew and trusted myself to do were changing.

    But still, medical professionals didn’t see my age as one where you could have dementia.

    I was finally sent for a SPECT scan – a type of nuclear imaging test that uses a radioactive substance and a special camera to create 3D pictures – which shows which areas of the brain are working.

    Although I struggled to get a formal diagnosis for nearly four years, the memory clinic wrote a letter to my employer suggesting simple things to be put in place to help with my memory.

    Unfortunately, this was brushed aside by management as they didn’t think that it could be anything but work stress or an ‘age thing’.

    So, I gave up my job. I had worked as a school secretary in Bristol for almost six years, but now I no longer recognised faces or remembered names and found myself getting confused.

    I felt very self-conscious and worried about what people thought of me. Although no one ever said anything to me, I didn’t want people to see this version of myself, where I just couldn’t seem to cope with things anymore.

    When the doctor called to tell me that I have dementia, I felt a sense of relief. I finally began to understand why I was changing.

    My husband and sons – who are such a source of strength to me – have struggled, but together, we learned how to adapt to living with dementia (Photo: Metro.co.uk)

    My husband came with me to discuss my diagnosis with my doctor.  We were told that I have ‘fronto-temporal dementia,’ and it felt like the bottom had fallen out of our worlds.

    We were both in a state of shock. And a more difficult task was still to come – I had to tell my sons.

    I called the Alzheimer’s Society Helpline because I initially didn’t know how to deal with my diagnosis.

    The helpline helped me come to terms with my diagnosis and understand that my life doesn’t end just because I have dementia.

    People like me, of working age, still have a substantial contribution to make and a lot to give.

    Yes, my diagnosis is the first thing I think about when I wake up and the last thing I think about when I go to bed, but I try not to let it completely take over.

    It’s worrying that there is such a misunderstanding around the condition, with the first thing people think of when you say ‘dementia’ is an old person in a care home who can’t remember anyone or anything.

    We need to do more as a society to raise awareness of this condition.

    People need to know that you can have dementia at any age and a diagnosis does not mean your life stops. A diagnosis only opens the door to support and medication – and the earlier you get that, the better your experience will be.

    People need to know that you can have dementia at any age and a diagnosis does not mean your life stops.

    Although I feel different from how I used to be, I’m still me.

    On those days when I need a bit of support from people who understand, I turn to Alzheimer’s Society’s Talking Point, an online community where you can chat and share experiences with people who are going through the same thing.

    My husband and sons – who are such a source of strength to me – have struggled, but together, we learned how to adapt to living with dementia.

    We had future plans, and we still do, but they’ve had to change to suit me and the unknown road that lies ahead.

    It will be tough, but we’re determined – I’m determined – not to give up and still live life to the full.

    Call Alzheimer’s Society’s National Dementia Helpline on 0300 222 11 22 if you’d like to talk to someone for information, support or advice about dementia.

    You can also sign up to Talking Point, Alzheimer’s Society’s online community where you can ask questions, share experiences and get information and practical tips on living with dementia.

    MORE: When I was homeless I was terrified I'd die too young

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    Labels ForgetfulLabels Forgetfulcharleyross92Labels ForgetfulLabels Forgetfulcharleyross92

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    (Picture: Valentina Marie)

    Valentina Maria, who calls herself a ‘blow job queen’, is a webcam model selling content on her social media profiles to those willing to pay big bucks.

    When she realised that people were willing to pay to view what she was posting online, the New Yorker decided to turn it into a full-time career.

    Now she is a top earner at Teddy’s Girls – a platform that hosts models selling content on their private Snapchats for either a monthly or annual subscription.

    For Valentina, that means making an income of $4,000 (£3,104) to $5,000 (£3,881) a week.

    Woman explains how she earns thousands of dollars by selling her Snapchat
    (Picture: Valentina Marie)

    After breaking her leg while working at a tanning salon, Valentina was cooped up at home and needed a way to make money.

    ‘I already had a following on Instagram just for the regular pics that I was posting, and then I broke my knee and had to get taken out of work at my job,’ Valentina explained to Metro.co.uk.

    ‘People messaged me all the time asking if I had a Premium and I never even knew what it was, but since I no longer had any money coming in I decided to go for it, it’s the best decision I ever made.’

    Premium is a private Snapchat account where you can share content of adult sexual nature in return for cash meaning you can post nude pictures/videos (shows) for people to pay to see.

    Woman explains how she earns thousands of dollars by selling her Snapchat
    (Picture: Valentina Marie)

    Valentina explained how Premium differs to porn and why she prefers an app like Snapchat to provide the service.

    She said: ‘The appeal of it is that where on Pornhub, for example, you can watch your favourite girls but you can’t talk to them.

    ‘On the Premium, you can actually have a conversation with the girl, you can sext with her, make requests, get customs. It’s more one-on-one than regular porn, more intimate.’

    ‘Snapchat is my favourite to use because the shows disappear within 24 hours, and you can see if someone is screen recording your videos, or screenshotting, which I don’t allow.

    ‘Also I like being able to control my Snapchat and who’s on it and who sees what, on other sites, I wouldn’t really have that.’

    Woman explains how she earns thousands of dollars by selling her Snapchat
    (Picture: Valentina Marie)

    Valentina’s prices vary; to join her Premium for a month, customers have to pay $25. To join for life, it’s $100 (£77.62). On top of that, she also makes money from tips which can be any amount.

    On her channel, she provides lots of oral and anal shows.

    She is also open to receiving pictures and videos of her customers but she never meets them or has physical contact with them.

    ‘I never meet anybody. Everything I do is strictly online. Always. No exceptions.

    ‘Personally, I think it’s a great way to make money because I get to stay at home, make my own hours, work whenever I feel like it basically. And I mean it could take someone all day at a regular job to make $100, I can make that in a minute.’

    More power to you, Valentina.

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    (Pictures: John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

    These pictures show what London looked like in the 1960s.

    The collection of photographs has been restored and released in a new book.

    The postcards were produced by photographer John Hinde, a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard.

    Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management.

    Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking.

    Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right.

    He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards.

    Battersea Park Lido London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failin
    Battersea Park Lido London by John Hinde (Picture: John Hinde/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Battersea Park Funfair London by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and f
    Battersea Park Funfair London by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    City of London Policeman by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failin
    City of London Policeman by Elmar Ludwig (Picture; Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Piccadilly by Night London by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and fail
    Piccadilly by Night London by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection)

     

    Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing
    Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde (Picture: John Hinde/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    The House of Parliament and the River Thames by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???
    The House of Parliament and the River Thames by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Trafalgar Square Fountains London by John Hinde.jpg ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,
    Trafalgar Square Fountains London by John Hinde (Picture: John Hinde/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing to
    Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde (Picture: John Hinde/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Piccadilly Circus London by David Noble ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing
    Piccadilly Circus London by David Noble (Picture; David Noble/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Post Office Tower London by Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and faili
    Post Office Tower London by Edmund Nagele (Picture: Edmund Nagele/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing
    Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde (Picture: John Hinde/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Royal Festival Hall London Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failin
    Caption: Royal Festival Hall London Edmund Nagele (Picture: Edmund Nagele/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

    It wasn’t just postcards of London that he produced.

    John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography.

    During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ‘Britain in Pictures’ and ‘Garden in Colour’ and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ‘Citizens in war – and after’ published in 1945.

    After a short stint in Chipperfield’s Circus, and failing to make a success of his own, he started John Hinde Ltd in Ireland in 1956.

    During the following 16 years, he and his studio of photographers travelled Great Britain, Ireland, many European and African countries taking photographs to produce as postcards.

    When the company was sold in 1972, it was the world’s most successful postcard company with annual sales of over 50 million postcards.

    Let’s take a look at some of the images from across UK and Ireland.

    The Bathing Pool Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and faili
    The Bathing Pool Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig (PictureElmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Bottons funfair at night Great Yarmouth by Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Ci
    Bottons funfair at night Great Yarmouth by Edmund Nagele (Picture: Edmund Nagele/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)
    Dreamland Amusement Park Margate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, an
    Dreamland Amusement Park Margate by Elmar Ludwig (Picture:Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    The Apron Dublin Airport by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing
    The Apron Dublin Airport by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    The East African Picnic Game Park Longleat Wiltshire by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipper
    The East African Picnic Game Park Longleat Wiltshire by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Motor Racing at St Ouens Bay Jersey by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,
    Motor Racing at St Ouens Bay Jersey by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    On the road to Keem Strand, Achill Island, Co Mayo Ireland by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chi
    On the road to Keem Strand, Achill Island, Co Mayo Ireland by John Hinde (Picture: John HindeJohn Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    Pentewan Sands Cornwall by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing
    Pentewan Sands Cornwall by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    The Promenade Havre des Pas Jersey by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,
    The Promenade Havre des Pas Jersey by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

     

    The Inner Harbour Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failin
    The Inner Harbour Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig (Picture: Elmar Ludwig/John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)
    John Hinde Collection ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing to make a success o
    The cover of the John Hinde Collection book (Picture: John Hinde Collection/John Hinde Ltd)

    The John Hinde Collection, a collection of 53 images over 68 pages, is available now, costing £16.

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    John Hinde collection showcases London in the 60's and it looks SO differentJohn Hinde collection showcases London in the 60's and it looks SO differentlauraabernethy6Battersea Park Lido London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinBattersea Park Funfair London by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and fCity of London Policeman by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinPiccadilly by Night London by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failPiccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingThe House of Parliament and the River Thames by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???Trafalgar Square Fountains London by John Hinde.jpg ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing toPiccadilly Circus London by David Noble ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingPost Office Tower London by Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failiPiccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingRoyal Festival Hall London Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinThe Bathing Pool Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failiBottons funfair at night Great Yarmouth by Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s CiDreamland Amusement Park Margate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, anThe Apron Dublin Airport by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingThe East African Picnic Game Park Longleat Wiltshire by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in ChipperMotor Racing at St Ouens Bay Jersey by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,On the road to Keem Strand, Achill Island, Co Mayo Ireland by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in ChiPentewan Sands Cornwall by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingThe Promenade Havre des Pas Jersey by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,The Inner Harbour Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinJohn Hinde Collection ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing to make a success oJohn Hinde collection showcases London in the 60's and it looks SO differentJohn Hinde collection showcases London in the 60's and it looks SO differentlauraabernethy6Battersea Park Lido London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinBattersea Park Funfair London by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and fCity of London Policeman by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinPiccadilly by Night London by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failPiccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingThe House of Parliament and the River Thames by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???Trafalgar Square Fountains London by John Hinde.jpg ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,Piccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing toPiccadilly Circus London by David Noble ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingPost Office Tower London by Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failiPiccadilly Circus London by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingRoyal Festival Hall London Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinThe Bathing Pool Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failiBottons funfair at night Great Yarmouth by Edmund Nagele ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s CiDreamland Amusement Park Margate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, anThe Apron Dublin Airport by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingThe East African Picnic Game Park Longleat Wiltshire by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in ChipperMotor Racing at St Ouens Bay Jersey by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,On the road to Keem Strand, Achill Island, Co Mayo Ireland by John Hinde ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in ChiPentewan Sands Cornwall by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failingThe Promenade Havre des Pas Jersey by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus,The Inner Harbour Ramsgate by Elmar Ludwig ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failinJohn Hinde Collection ???John Hinde Collection??? ??? the book This is the first time the restored original transparencies that were used to produce the world-famous John Hinde postcards have been printed in a book. Some have the corresponding postcard opposite to show how they differ, some are given the space they deserve as standalone photographs. In some cases, details were chosen to show the quality of the original photographs. John Hinde, a photographer, innovator and entrepreneur, was a key figure in the development of the colour photograph as a postcard. Each photograph is innovative in its use of colour and stage-management. Shot with large format cameras, the production of these photographs was an extraordinary undertaking. Sometimes photographs could take a day and a half to get right. He used vibrant, highly saturated colours to depict a proverbially beautiful image produced to the highest standards. He was making an image for the man on the street not the photography critic. The images represent and document Britain???s post-war leisure boom. John Hinde equated vibrant colours with happiness and thought his pictures should convey a positive, good feeling. He created these images to give tourists the colourful memories he thought they would want from their holidays - fifty years later the images do a similar thing for the generations that grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. The images are part of the fabric of memory. They provide fleeting glimpses of lost time. John Hinde was born in Somerset in 1916 and had always been interested in photography. During the 1940s he took photographs for many series of books, including ???Britain in Pictures??? and ???Garden in Colour??? and famously he photographed London during the blitz, which were used to illustrate ???Citizens in war ??? and after??? published in 1945. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society in 1943. After a short stint in Chipperfield???s Circus, and failing to make a success o

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    Derek Cobia, Payton and Amy. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.
    Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, invested $15,000 to renovate an old school bus to travel the country (Picture: The Frugal RVer / SWNS)

    Derek Cobia and his wife Amy, from Atlanta, Georgia, say their lives used to revolve around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they didn’t need.

    So Derek, 33, and Amy, 32, decided to change things up, selling their home and buying an old school bus to live in.

    After renovating the bus, the family – including their three-year-old daughter Payson – decided to travel the country together.

    Now they’ve visited 33 U.S states in the last 18 months.

    Derek Cobia, Payton and Amy. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.
    They’ve travelled to 33 states with their three-year-old daughter Payson (Picture: The Frugal RVer / SWNS)

    Derek and Amy got used to living in a mobile home when they swapped their house for a caravan in a local campsite, paying $65,000 for the RV for a year.

    During their time at the campsite, Derek, a financial adviser, and Amy, a teacher, became inspired by the full-time travelling families that passed through.

    But with the RV costing a lot of money plus requiring payments for repairs, the married couple decided to swap it for an old school bus which they bought on eBay for $3,000.

    Now their mobile home comes with slar panels, a composting toilet and a bathtub big enough for two people as well as a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold-up beds.

    Derek Cobia and Payton. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.
    (Picture: The Frugal RVer / SWNS)
    The Interior of the bus. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.
    (Picture: The Frugal RVer / SWNS)

    ‘I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It’s the greatest thing we have ever done,’ said Amy.

    ‘At first, it was hard, I’m a clean person and was used to showering at least once a day.

    ‘It used to stress me out when Payson got dirty but she doesn’t need to have a bath every single day.

    ‘She’s perfectly healthy and if she is dirty I just wash her down with a warm soapy cloth at night if we aren’t hooked up to water. It’s hard sometimes not to have WiFi service everywhere we go.

    ‘I need to be connected to WIFI for the part-time work I do, and if there’s no service it can be really tough.’

    But ultimately, they enjoy being switched off.

    Payton and Amy Cobia. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.
    (Picture: The Frugal RVer / SWNS)

    ‘Our biggest goal was to reduce our costs and increase our sustainability. We wanted to be as eco-friendly as possible,’ added Derek.

    ‘We wanted to put in solar panels so we could have electricity when we were off the grid and a composting toilet.’

    The whole experience has been enriching for their toddler too, added the couple.

    ‘Prayson is not afraid of anything and she is so social. She’ll just walk up to anyone and start talking.

    Derek Cobia, Payton and Amy. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.
    (Picture: The Frugal RVer / SWNS)

    ‘I think this lifestyle has made her a really well-rounded little person. She knows the difference between a mountain and a volcano, a river, and a lake. She’s more aware of her surroundings.

    ‘We’ve been so lucky to see some of the country’s most beautiful national parks.

    ‘My favourite state has to be Oregon. It’s so beautiful, the coast is amazing.’

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    MORE: You can now buy a house in Sicily for £1 – here’s how


    Payton and Amy Cobia. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.Payton and Amy Cobia. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. Payton and Amy Cobia. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.Payton and Amy Cobia. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.faimabakar1Derek Cobia, Payton and Amy. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.Derek Cobia, Payton and Amy. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.Derek Cobia and Payton. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.The Interior of the bus. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.Payton and Amy Cobia. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.Derek Cobia, Payton and Amy. See SWNS story BRNYbus; This family have dropped out of the rat race to live in an eco-friendly school bus. Derek Cobia, 33, and his wife Amy, 32, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and filling their four-bedroom home with things they ?didn?t need?. Now their days are spent on the open road - visiting 33 states in the last 18-months. "Most of America is so glued to their phones, they don?t spend quality family time together," said Derek. "I never want to go back to our old lifestyle. It?s the greatest thing we have ever done in our relationship," agreed Amy. The couple have invested $15,000 to renovate their bus with solar panels, a composting toilet and a bath tub big enough for two people. The 28ft by 8ft interior also contains a working kitchen, a wood-burning stove and fold up beds. The journey began in 2015 when they sold their house in Atlanta, Georgia, and moved to a local campsite with their daughter Payson, three, where they lived in a $65,000 RV for a year.

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    (Pictures: SWNS)

    These triplets were conceived at different times.

    Their mum Beata Bienias, 36, had been trying to have a baby for a decade and was about to have an embryro transfer.

    But she had no idea that when the embryo, which went on to become Amelia, was implanted, she was already pregnant with twins Matylda and Borys.

    She said: ‘It was all very confusing, but my first scan showed that the twins were conceived just a few days before Amelia.

    ‘They tell you at the fertility clinic that you can’t have sex for the four days before your egg collection, because the hormones mean more eggs are fertilised than normal.

    ‘But I think we must have done – because on the scan you can see that the twins were conceived some time in the week before the embryo transfer.’

    Before falling pregnant, Beata had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone.

    But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.

    Beata Bienias, 36 who lost five stone in order to get pregnant by IVF and then had triplets, Borris (camo), Amelia (pink) and Matilda (blue). See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.
    Borris (camo), Amelia (pink) and Matilda (blue) (Picture: SWNS)

    But miraculously she had also conceived twins just days before her embryo transfer.

    The pregnancy has been described by one fertility expert as ‘almost impossible’.

    It means Beata and her husband Pawel, 40, are now parents to four-week-old Amelia and twins Matylda and Borys.

    The besotted mum was told by stunned doctors her non-identical twins were conceived naturally just a few days before her IVF embryo transfer on May 2 last year.

    And the stunned parents were still unaware that Beata was already pregnant at the time she discovered her IVF treatment had been successful.

    Factory worker Beata, from Corsham, Wilts., said: ‘It was the biggest miracle. I never thought something this incredible could happen to me.

    Beata Bienias after lossing 5 stone. See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.
    Beata Bienias after lossing 5 stone (Picure: SWNS)

    ‘I spent many days thinking that maybe I was the person who would never have a baby.

    ‘I never, ever thought there would be three in there.

    ‘I still can’t quite believe it when I look at the three of them. I’m so happy,’ she added.

    Fertility expert Emma Cannon, who has worked in the field for 25 years and founded the Emma Cannon Clinic in Chelsea, London, was stunned to hear of Beata’s triplets.

    She said: ‘In my 25 years as a fertility specialist, I have only come across one or two scenarios in which women have fallen pregnant whilst undergoing IVF treatment.

    ‘But this has happened before the embryo transfer takes place – and they then choose to proceed with the natural pregnancy, and do not proceed with the IVF cycle.

    ‘I have never encountered anyone who has conceived naturally before, or around the time of, embryo transfer, and then gone on to become pregnant via the IVF cycle as well.

    ‘But I also know that there is much we do not understand and miracles do happen. I wish Beata all the very best with her three little miracles.’ Emma added.

    Recalling the moment she found out she was having three babies, Beata added: ‘The sonographer turned to my husband and asked if he wanted to sit down.

    ‘Then she us there were three babies in there.’

    For almost four years prior to falling pregnant, Beata had visited a fertility clinic in Bath, where she was advised to lose weight to increase her chances of getting pregnant.

    In the summer of 2017, she signed up for the Cambridge Weight Plan, and shed an impressive five stone in just six months.

    Beata said: ‘My motivation was really high. I wanted to be pregnant.

    Beata Bienias, 36 30 weeks pregnant. See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.
    Beata at 30 weeks pregnant (Picture: SWNS)

    ‘Losing the weight made me really happy. I was really proud of my weight going down and down each week. It was brilliant.’

    By February 2018, Beata was given the thumbs-up by her GP and weight loss consultant to begin having blood tests for IVF.

    She began having the injections in April, and the embryo transfer took place on May 2.

    She said: ‘It was amazing. It was a really emotional time. I couldn’t wait for the moment to collect my eggs. I cried when I had the embryo put inside me.’

    But the rules around what Beata could and could not do during this time were tight – including not having sex for the four days leading up to her embryo transfer.

    She continued: ‘They tell you to wait for 14 days before taking a pregnancy test, but I couldn’t wait, and I did one after nine days.

    ‘When I saw those two lines, I went out and did about five or six more tests, just to make sure. It was just amazing.’

    With what she thought was just one baby growing in her womb, Beata and Pawel then went on holiday for two weeks to celebrate.

    And when they returned, the couple went for their first scan at the fertility clinic in Bath.

    Beata recalls: ‘When I sat down the sonographer told me not to be nervous if they couldn’t see anything the first time.

    Beata Bienias, 36 who lost five stone in order to get pregnant by IVF and then had triplets, Borris (camo), Amelia (pink) and Matilda (blue). See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.
    Caption: Beata and her triplets (Picture: Francis Hawkins / SWNS)

    ‘But then she turned to my husband and asked if he wanted to sit down. He said he would stay standing – and then she told us there were three babies on the scan.’

    Beata continued: ‘It was the biggest miracle. I never, ever thought there would be three in there.

    ‘We were told the two twins were conceived naturally. I couldn’t believe it – after so many years of trying and getting nothing, and then having IVF and conceiving naturally.’

    The thrilled mum added: ‘The pregnancy was brilliant, it was really smooth.

    ‘I was really worried in the beginning, when I heard I was having triplets. But nothing was an issue. I really enjoyed it.

    ‘Everyone who looked after me was amazing – I had great care from staff at Royal United Hospital in Bath.’

    Amelia, Matylda and Borys were born by Caesarian section at the Royal United Hospital on December 13, when the pregnancy had reached 34 weeks.

    Amelia was born weighing 5lbs 2oz, Matylda weighed 4lb 5oz, and little Borys weighed just 4lbs.

    But Beata said all three babies are doing well and are ‘growing too fast’.

    Besotted Beata said: ‘I am enjoying everything – even when they wee in bed and I have to clean it up.

    ‘I feed them nearly every three hours, and I go for walks with them every day.

    ‘My husband is absolutely proud of his three babies, and cuddles them every day when he gets home from work.

    ‘I had no idea what to expect from being a mum-of-three all of a sudden. But I’m so happy,’ she added.

    MORE: Postcard collection shows how different London looked in the 1960s

    MORE: Family sells four-bedroom home to live in a renovated school bus and travel the country


    IVF weight lossIVF weight losslauraabernethy6Beata Bienias, 36 who lost five stone in order to get pregnant by IVF and then had triplets, Borris (camo), Amelia (pink) and Matilda (blue). See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.Beata Bienias after lossing 5 stone. See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.Beata Bienias, 36 30 weeks pregnant. See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.Beata Bienias, 36 who lost five stone in order to get pregnant by IVF and then had triplets, Borris (camo), Amelia (pink) and Matilda (blue). See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.IVF weight lossIVF weight losslauraabernethy6Beata Bienias, 36 who lost five stone in order to get pregnant by IVF and then had triplets, Borris (camo), Amelia (pink) and Matilda (blue). See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.Beata Bienias after lossing 5 stone. See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.Beata Bienias, 36 30 weeks pregnant. See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.Beata Bienias, 36 who lost five stone in order to get pregnant by IVF and then had triplets, Borris (camo), Amelia (pink) and Matilda (blue). See SWNS story SWBRtriplets: A mum who struggled to fall pregnant for a decade had TRIPLETS after she conceived one baby through IVF and twins naturally - in the same WEEK. Beata Bienias, 36, had begun to give up hope of ever becoming a mother due to issues with her health including polycystic ovaries, brought on by weighing over 17 stone. But she lost weight and the new mum got more than she ever dreamed of when she finally fell pregnant with one baby through IVF.

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    You might not know what ASMR is but you’ve probably heard it.

    Do you enjoy the sound of rustling leaves or people whispering in videos or the sound soap makes when cut into hundreds of tiny cubes?

    ASMR is kind of like when your eyes get a kick out of looking at aesthetically pleasing things, but for the ears.

    And now there’s a new thing people are doing for kicks; watching biscuits or as our friends across the pond like to call it, cookies, being decorated.

    The satisfactory videos are similar to ASMR and give you the tingles, helping to relax and feel calm.

    Watching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcU
    (Picture: YouTube/Awesome Cookie)

    Food videos have long been a major trend on the internet with most of us being satisfied by watching ingredients come together to make foods and desserts that look oh-so-easy that we’ll probably never recreate.

    But they’re vastly popular. Now if you peruse YouTube or scroll through Twitter or Instagram, you’ll find plenty of timelapses of small biscuits being decorated with icing, sprinkles and the like.

    Those who are particular stans of the cookie decoration videos might even enjoy almost hour-long compilations of different biccies being designed.

    Watching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcU
    (Picture: YouTube/Awesome Cookie)
    Watching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcU
    (Picture: YouTube/Awesome Cookie)

    The videos can range from 10 minutes to 57 minutes and have anywhere from thousands to millions of viewers.

    There are even channels dedicated to the craft, one of which – Amazing Cookies – has over 85,000 followers.

    One master baker, Amber Spiegel, has made so many deliciously intricate bakes that she has over a million followers on Instagram.

    Baking novelty biscuits, cakes, and macarons, Amber’s main game is cookie decoration, and she also holds classes to teach others how to master the craft.

    Instagram Photo

    Watching cake decorations is also a popular trend on social media but cookies seem to have a bit more of an edge, with smaller surface areas meaning bakers have to get creative when it comes to doing them up.

    There’s just something about watching food come together that we mere mortals can’t get enough of.

    If you feel like delving into the world of cookie decoration, here are some videos for you to procrastinate with. Be warned though, you could end up down a rabbit hole.

    MORE: What is a flexitarian diet?

    MORE: Man’s incredible story of a spider in the loo will put you off pooing at work

    MORE: What time does the McDonald’s breakfast stop and what is on the breakfast menu?


    cookie-ad42cookie-ad42faimabakar1Watching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcUWatching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcUWatching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcUcookie-ad42cookie-ad42faimabakar1Watching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcUWatching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcUWatching cookie decorating is the new ASMR Provider: YouTube/Awesome Cookie Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbAot2lqcU

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    (Picture:: Kheris Rogers)

    American student Kheris Rogers was one of four black students at her school in Los Angeles.

    As a result, she was bullied for her dark complexion. Even in the first grade, Kheris would take longer baths hoping she could wash away some of her darkness.

    Kheris also remembered a time when a teacher handed her a black crayon while students were asked to create self-portraits. The other black children were handed brown crayons.

    After moving schools, and embracing the words of her grandmother, ‘flexin’ in my complexion’ – Kheris created a t-shirt with the wise words.

    Then her sister Taylor tweeted an image of Kheris wearing the tee which quickly went viral and even actress Lupita Nyong’o was seen wearing the shirt.

    (Picture: Kheris Rogers)

    Kheris told Metro.co.uk how the idea for the shirts came to be.

    ‘I wanted to figure out a way of how I could combine my love for inspiring others and my passion for fashion,’ she said.

    ‘When I first went viral, so many people around the world from different cultures were reaching out to me about how they could relate to my story. It then clicked in my head that a clothing line would be a way to connect with these people. Looking down and seeing “Flexin’ In My Complexion” on your T-shirt would be a reminder of being confident in who you are.

    ‘My sister and I created the clothing line together. When we first came up with the idea, we went to my mum who let us borrow $150 (£116) to create our first batch of T-Shirts and our website.

    ‘It was an unreal feeling seeing Lupita wear a “Flexin’ In My Complexion” tee. I was so excited that she was willing to support my campaign.’

    (Picture: Kheris Rogers)

    The talented youngster explained that her future plans include expanding her clothing line, with her ultimate goal being to have her own clothing store.

    Given the success of her work thus far, that might not be a pipe dream.

    The likes of Chelsea Clinton, Terry Crews, Tyra Banks have commended Kheris on her work, with actress Whoopi Goldberg even sporting a tee.

    (Picture: Kheris Rogers)

    She has acquired a large gathering on social media too, a lot of whom have praised her for celebrating dark skin.

    We expect that Kheris’s career is just beginning to take off.

    MORE: Are white women pretending to be light skin black for the attention of men?

    MORE: Primark’s new model is representing the beauty of darker skin R

    MORE: Why do I love watching makeup get destroyed?


    Girl, 13, bullied for dark skin creates 'flexin' in my complexion' shirt worn by Lupito Nyong'oGirl, 13, bullied for dark skin creates 'flexin' in my complexion' shirt worn by Lupito Nyong'ofaimabakar1Girl, 13, bullied for dark skin creates 'flexin' in my complexion' shirt worn by Lupito Nyong'oGirl, 13, bullied for dark skin creates 'flexin' in my complexion' shirt worn by Lupito Nyong'ofaimabakar1

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    Lauren Fox, 24, from County Durham, who has been miraculously reunited with her pet cat Sidney (Pictures: North News)

    A cat made an astonishing return from the dead when he appeared three years after his owners were told he had been run over and killed.

    Sharon Fox, 53, and her daughter Lauren, 24, were left distraught when their beloved pet Sidney vanished in early 2016.

    The pair frantically put up posters in their home town of Brandon, County Durham, appealing for information about the missing moggy.

    They were devastated when they were told a cat matching Sidney’s appearance had been knocked over and taken to landfill by the council.

    But almost three years later Sharon and Lauren were left amazed when they received a phone call from a woman who said she’d found Sidney, now six, alive and well.

    Lauren, a customer experience manager, said: ‘We couldn’t get our heads around it.

    Dated: 20/01/2019 "BACK FROM THE DEAD" ... Sidney the cat, who has been miraculously reunited with his owner Lauren Fox, 24, THREE YEARS after his family were told he had been run over and killed. See story and VIDEO by North News
    Sidney the cat (Picture: Will Walker / North News)

    ‘We had already mourned Sidney. We’d been sent a picture of him laying dead on the side of the road.

    ‘But this woman was adamant she had him with her. She said: “Have you got a cat called Sidney?” We thought it was a sick joke at first.

    ‘She said that she’d checked the cat’s microchip and Sidney’s name came up along with my mam’s phone number and address.’

    The mum and daughter didn’t believe it was true until they went round to the woman’s house that afternoon and were finally reunited with their long lost pet.

    Sharon, a loan advisor, said: ‘The woman, who takes in abandoned and stray cats, had warned us Sidney was a little hostile after living wild.

    ‘But as soon as he saw me he rolled over onto his back and started crying, wanting a belly rub.

    ‘There was no doubt this was Sidney and that he remembered us. He still knew his name.

    ‘We were both completely overwhelmed. We took him straight home and spoiled him rotten.’

    When Sidney went missing Sharon and Lauren were contacted by Meadowfield British Legion to say a cat matching his appearance had been knocked over nearby.

    They were even sent a picture of the animal, whose colouring appeared identical to their missing pet’s.

    The pair’s anguish was compounded when they were told Sidney had been taken away by a Durham County Council worker who dumped him in landfill without checking his microchip.

    Lauren said: ‘It was terrible. We couldn’t even bring his body home and bury him. We were very angry with the council at the time.

    ‘It is simply amazing that Sidney has managed to survive in the wild for three years.

    Dated: 20/01/2019 "BACK FROM THE DEAD" ... Lauren Fox, 24, from County Durham, who has been miraculously reunited with her pet cat Sidney THREE YEARS after she was told he had been run over and killed. See story and VIDEO by North News
    Lauren Fox and Sidney (Picture: Will Walker / North News)

    ‘A friend of the woman who took him in had spotted him living in brambles and had been leaving food before she caught him.

    ‘He has lost almost all of his teeth because he must have been eating animals which are tough to chew such as mice, rats and birds.

    ‘Sidney has obviously been in fights because he has marks on his head and he had a split lip, which has now healed.

    ‘We are delighted to have him home. He is getting lots of cuddles and food, and he seems very content. We will never let him out again.’

    Sidney went missing in March 2016 and turned up in a field close to Bishop Auckland Hospital last week around 12 miles away from where he originally
    disappeared on Tiree Close in Brandon.

    Lauren and Sharon think Sidney, who was abandoned on a neighbour’s doorstep as a kitten, might have ended up lost after stowing away in a vehicle.

    In 2016 Durham County Council apologised for dumping the cat thought to be

    Sidney without checking the chip. A spokesperson said: ‘Due to an oversight our usual processes were not followed and we are very sorry.’

    MORE: Girl, 12, bullied for dark skin creates ‘flexin’ in my complexion’ shirt worn by Lupita Nyong’o

    MORE: Watching biscuits being decorated is the satisfying alternative to ASMR


    Dated: 20/01/2019 "BACK FROM THE DEAD" ... Lauren Fox, 24, from County Durham, who has been miraculously reunited with her pet cat Sidney THREE YEARS after she was told he had been run over and killed. See story and VIDEO by North NewsDated: 20/01/2019 Dated: 20/01/2019 "BACK FROM THE DEAD" ... Lauren Fox, 24, from County Durham, who has been miraculously reunited with her pet cat Sidney THREE YEARS after she was told he had been run over and killed. See story and VIDEO by North NewsDated: 20/01/2019 "BACK FROM THE DEAD" ... Lauren Fox, 24, from County Durham, who has been miraculously reunited with her pet cat Sidney THREE YEARS after she was told he had been run over and killed. See story and VIDEO by North Newslauraabernethy6Dated: 20/01/2019 "BACK FROM THE DEAD" ... Sidney the cat, who has been miraculously reunited with his owner Lauren Fox, 24, THREE YEARS after his family were told he had been run over and killed. See story and VIDEO by North NewsDated: 20/01/2019 "BACK FROM THE DEAD" ... Lauren Fox, 24, from County Durham, who has been miraculously reunited with her pet cat Sidney THREE YEARS after she was told he had been run over and killed. See story and VIDEO by North News

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    Man asks whether he's in the wrong for giving adult daughter ??1k allowance a month
    (Picture: Photolibrary RM/Reddit)

    The bank of mum and dad can be a lovely safety net for a lucky few.

    But for parents, constantly supplying dosh for their children can be draining.

    One dad who’s been funding his son and daughter on a $1,000 (£776) a month allowance plus paying for their credit cards, is considering cutting off his daughter who he says is ‘spoiled’.

    After giving her whatever designer clothes she wanted, a Mercedez-Benz for her sixteenth birthday, a credit card with a £5,000 limit (£3,881) limit, as well as an apartment, the dad said he’d had enough of financially supporting his 22-year-old daughter.

    Can’t relate (Picture: Getty)

    The father explained how he’d grown up on nothing and worked since he was 11 years old to be as wealthy as he is now.

    ‘I have been busting my a*s every day to get rich,’ he wrote on Reddit.

    ‘I paid my way through college and I’m very blessed to say that I’m wealthy now. Because of this, I wanted my kids to never experience the hard sh*t I had to go through as a kid being so poor and never having anything.

    ‘As a result, my daughter is spoiled as can be, I realised this is my fault and my wife’s because ever since she was a little girl I got her whatever she wanted no matter the price

    ‘My son who’s 19 has never really asked for much, he only wanted a Honda when he turned 16 and he still drives it. He also works part-time and I gave him a credit card with a $1,000 limit which he doesn’t come close to maxing out.

    ‘Here’s where the problems start with my daughter, she graduated in June, has never worked before. I bought her a condo as a grad present and I keep nudging her to try and find a job but she’s too busy trying to become a model on Instagram so my wife says.

    ‘A few weeks ago I told my wife I was cutting her off almost completely except for $1k a month allowance. No more $5k credit card limit and coming to mummy and daddy whenever she needs cash.’

    The frustrated dad explained that he would continue supporting his son’s credit card payments and allowances as well as paying for his tuition fees but the sister was not going to receive the same treatment, save a $1k monthly cash payment.

    His daughter wasn’t too happy with the arrangement though.

    ‘I sat down with my daughter and she got super mad as expected and insulted me a lot, I almost cried after she left,’ he went on.

    ‘I’ve given my life to make money to make my family happy and to hear that from my daughter made me so sad. But I knew I still had to do this for her own sake, so I took away her card and gave her $1k cash and told her to come see me at the end of January for another 1k.

    ‘I told her to get a job and that I would pay for a career coach and everything to help her. She was mad and didn’t answer me other than calling me a bad dad and an a*shole.’

    While most people marvelled at just how much the dad was funding his kids, some gave practical advice such as slowly weaning her off her financial dependence.

    Some suggested seeing a financial advisor to divide all that money (alright for some).

    MORE: Family sells four-bedroom home to live in a renovated school bus and travel the country

    MORE: No, renting doesn’t mean that you’re ‘throwing your money down the drain’

    MORE: In truly shocking news, having wealthy parents will help you buy a house


    Caucasian female, age 15, with her father, age 43Caucasian female, age 15, with her father, age 43faimabakar1Man asks whether he's in the wrong for giving adult daughter ??1k allowance a monthCaucasian female, age 15, with her father, age 43Caucasian female, age 15, with her father, age 43faimabakar1Man asks whether he's in the wrong for giving adult daughter ??1k allowance a month

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    (Pictures: North News)

    There’s probably quite a few things on your dream home list – lots of light, a garden, a big kitchen.

    But have you ever wished your house could have actual sails?

    Probably not, but there are two actual windmills up for sale at the minute and suddenly it’s a requirement that is top of the list.

    Near Cambridge, a Grade II Listed windmill – Mill Hill – is up for sale, complete with sails and half an acre of land.

    Further north, a 400-year-old former windmill – The Thruff – can be purchased in Northumberland.

    Mill Hill, which is located in the Swaffham Prior area, dates back to the mid 19th century.

    It is understood to have been a working mill until the 1920s, before being left in a derelict state.

    In the early 1970s, the windmill was converted into a home.

    The three bedroom property, which is has three octagonal wings, is on the market for £675,000 through Pocock & Shaw.

    Dated: 19/01/2019 MILL HILL WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows the interior of Mill Hill. See story North News
    The interior of the Mill Hill (Picture: North News / NNP)

    Sue Dickenson, 72, and her husband Tony, 76, decided to put the unusual property on the market after living in it for eight years.

    The retired couple, who have three children and five grandchildren, originally bought the windmill to escape the city but are now looking to downsize.

    Retired ballet teacher Sue, said: ‘A windmill is a very romantic place. I just think we fell in love with it.

    ‘We like older properties that have a bit of a challenge.

    ‘We bought it because we wanted to get out of the city and get out into the country.

    ‘We have done it – we have got chickens and we have grown our own vegetables.

    ‘We want to give somebody else the chance to do the same.

    ‘It feels extremely rural and you look out on to open fields, it’s really nice.

    ‘But we are not stuck out in the middle of no where, we are 20 minutes from Cambridge.

    ‘There is another wind mill opposite us. We are the only two wind mills in the whole country that have both the big sails and the little ones behind.

    ‘As soon as you walk into the front door you are in the windmill and when you look up you can see right up.

    ‘When you are sitting in the lounge it is easy to forget it’s a wind mill.’

    Dated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows an exterior view of The Thruff See story North News
    The Thruff windmill (Picture:North News / NNP)

    Sue and Tony, a former academic, spent a lot of money renovating the property and have replaced the old sails.

    Sue said: ‘We had no qualms about doing that because we have loved living here.

    ‘We are well into our 70’s and we have a lot of land – we are looking to move to somewhere smaller. We are downsizing and moving closer to my daughter.

    ‘My husband is 76 now and we think unless we start doing something now it will be difficult to move in four or five years.

    ‘Our friends and family love it. They hate the fact that we are going to move.It’s a great place for parties, we have had some big parties here.

    ‘We have had six man tents in the garden and everyone parks their cars in the paddock. It’s a great place to have a BBQ.

    ‘If you are somebody who can work from home it is a wonderful place to be.

    ‘We decided to put it on the market to see how it goes. We have had a great response, people love it.’

    In England’s border country, The Thruff is on the market for £995,000 through Bradley Hall.

    The six bedroom has been restored with east and west wings, constructed in the1970s and 1980’s, extending from it.

    It is just 1.5 miles from the town of Hexham and sits on an impressive 1.23 acre plot.

    It also boasts breath taking views of the countryside and a versatile studio out building.

    Donna Spence, 52, has lived in the property with her husband, her mother and her two children for almost 15 years.

    The photographer, who wants to move closer to the town for her children, described her house as “totally unique”.

    She said: ‘It’s a cute little windmill in manicured gardens. It’s just idyllic, it’s beautiful.

    ‘We didn’t want an ordinary house, we wanted one with a bit of character.

    ‘It’s a truly unique house and a truly unique location. It is quirky and full of character.

    ‘Every time I drive up the drive I pinch myself and think how ‘wow’ it is.

    ‘Everybody who comes, the delivery man, the post man, says ‘wow’. It has definitely got the wow factor.

    ‘All my friends want to get married here. We have had our wedding here. They think it is amazing, everybody does.

    Dated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows the granny flat of The Thruff See story North News
    The interior of The Thruff (Picture: North News / NNP)

    ‘It is surrounded by nature and animals and the views are amazing. We have got fantastic dark skies.

    ‘I am hoping to move into Hexham as the kids are teenagers now and they want to be out with their mates.

    ‘It will be an absolute shame to go.

    ‘We have got a studio at the bottom which is insulated so you can work from home.

    ‘I have had a lot of people saying it could be a high end restaurant or a B&B or a gym. It is a very versatile contemporary space.

    ‘It’s a Marmite house, you will either love it or hate it.’

    MORE: Dad asks whether he’s wrong to cut off his adult daughter from her £4k a month allowance

    MORE: Family sells four-bedroom home to live in a renovated school bus and travel the country

    MORE: Postcard collection shows how different London looked in the 1960s


    Dated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows an exterior view of The Thruff See story North NewsDated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows an exterior view of The Thruff See story North Newslauraabernethy6Dated: 19/01/2019 MILL HILL WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows the interior of Mill Hill. See story North NewsDated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows an exterior view of The Thruff See story North NewsDated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows the granny flat of The Thruff See story North NewsDated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows an exterior view of The Thruff See story North NewsDated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows an exterior view of The Thruff See story North Newslauraabernethy6Dated: 19/01/2019 MILL HILL WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows the interior of Mill Hill. See story North NewsDated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows an exterior view of The Thruff See story North NewsDated: 19/01/2019 THE THRUFF WINDMILL FOR SALE ... Two rare opportunities have arisen to escape the city and move into a WINDMILL, with the 19th Century Grade II Listed Mill Hill, located in the Swaffham Prior area near Cambridge, up for sale for ?675,000, and the 400-year-old former windmill The Thruff, in Northumberland, on the market for ?995,000. Picture shows the granny flat of The Thruff See story North News

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Pregnant women can’t do lots of things; drink alcohol, smoke, do anything too strenuous and they have to avoid eating raw fish – which very sadly means no sushi.

    It can be all the more difficult if you have cravings for these things.

    One pregnant woman who loves Japanese cuisine but has to stay away from it expected some solidarity from her husband.

    She really didn’t want to go to a Japanese place for dinner but he insisted that they did.

    The expectant mum then specifically asked him to order something other than her favourite which includes raw fish. But he went ahead and bought some anyway, eating it in front of her.

    When the dad-to-be took to Reddit to recall the situation, no one was on his side.

    Pregnant woman holds her abdomen while a man with negative emotion looks at it in the background.
    (Picture: Getty)

    ‘Before my wife got pregnant, we used to go out to the same sushi place and order the same thing, but our usual order has raw fish, so she can’t eat it now,’ he explained on the thread.

    ‘She also can’t drink obviously, which we used to do here.

    ‘We went to the same restaurant because she still loves Japanese food but she has to order something different. She asked me if I would not order our usual because it makes her sad that she can’t eat it, but I’m a picky eater so I ordered it anyway because I don’t really like trying new things, especially sushi which can be hit or miss.

    ‘She told me I was being inconsiderate for eating the things she can’t in front of her. Am I being an a*sehole?’

    And almost everyone said yes.

    You have to respect pregnant women’s food requests (Picture: Getty)

    Most commenters said the dad-to-be was being selfish and inconsiderate, especially as his wife didn’t want to go to that particular restaurant in the first place.

    ‘You took her to a sushi place and she asked if you could at least order something she didn’t have to lust after and you couldn’t even change your order to make your hormonal, pregnant wife less sad,’ wrote one person.

    ‘Damn man, just go to Olive Garden next time.’

    Another writer was less forgiving: ‘The woman is carrying your child and dealing with all the physical and mental stress that brings with it and you couldn’t even be a big boy enough to order something that wasn’t your first choice.

    ‘”I’m a picky eater” – you’re a grown man, not a toddler. You need to figure out a way to grow up fast before your child arrives.’

    Ooh, tough crowd?

    MORE: Male doctor complains about pregnant wife being lazy and no one is on his side

    MORE: Dad asks whether he’s wrong to cut off his adult daughter from her £4k a month allowance

    MORE: Boohoo accused of shoving pillows up models’ outfits to sell maternity clothes


    Dad-to-be orders sushi in front of pregnant wife after she specifically asks him not toDad-to-be orders sushi in front of pregnant wife after she specifically asks him not tofaimabakar1Pregnant woman holds her abdomen while a man with negative emotion looks at it in the background.Dad-to-be orders sushi in front of pregnant wife after she specifically asks him not toDad-to-be orders sushi in front of pregnant wife after she specifically asks him not tofaimabakar1Pregnant woman holds her abdomen while a man with negative emotion looks at it in the background.

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    Let’s face it, cookie cutter holidays have had their day. This year, why not embrace adventure as you make the most of your days out of the office, by island hopping?

    If the idea of island hopping is bringing you out in hives, let us set your mind at rest because actually, Olympic Holidays have got you covered.

    No more delayed flights in sweaty airports as you wait for your transfer. No more hulking your over-packed suitcase up rickety stairs to a dingy apartment.

    Instead, picture boat rides that celebrities would be proud of taking you to your next island destination. If you’re after luxury relaxation, with stunning views and culinary delights, then picking between the array of resorts will be the hardest part of booking your trip as Olympic Holidays are designed to make your holidays customised for you. Take advantage of the island specialists.

    This year, you can make your holiday dreams come true with a Grecian adventure.

    You can pick up to five destinations to visit on one holiday and make the most out of your time away from your daily grind. Whether you’re riding solo, or travelling with the family, in groups or looking for a romantic getaway – a breathtaking trip is awaiting you to start making your memories.

    Set the pace and pick the place, no compromises as you decide if you want to chill out on the stunning beaches, explore historical sites, light up your Instagram from the hot spots or find solace and immerse yourself in the local culture as you discover local tavernas.

    Let us show you what your holiday could look like:

    Romantic Greece

    Dare to dream with a magnificent holiday that will get the green monsters going at home, and be the trend setter with a trip to Santorini, Naxos and Mykonos.

    It’s possible with Olympic Holidays. The Cyclades are the best for not only romance, but luxury too, with iconic views to take your breath away. You won’t want to be anywhere else.

    Each of the islands have their own clear identity, and with the team helping you craft your idyllic getaway, they can advise on best days to travel as you skip between.

    Santorini

    The Cyclades’ biggest island, is a fantastic place to start. Not only for those Instagram-worthy shots, but also the delightful local delicacies and tavernas are waiting to welcome you in. The idyllic white-washed villages with their stunning blue-domed churches set against the deep blue oceans and cloudless skies will make for envy-inducing snaps.

    Naxos

    Taste the fruits of the island, with its lush grapes, lemons and olives and relax on its golden beaches as you get your dose of much-needed Vitamin D. The island not only offers a bustling town where you can explore, but also fall in love with the enchanting villages off the beaten track.

    Mykonos

    Close your eyes and you can picture Mykonos. With the alluring deep blue doors and shutters against the familiar white-washed buildings that so often make stunning postcards, but now it could be you sending them. Lap up the luxurious time on offer, whether you fancy the five star De.Light Boutique Hotel, or something a little more low-key. The choice is yours.

    Sun chaser

    Are you a sun-seeker that doesn’t want summer to end? Then seriously, look no further as The Dodecanese islands along with Crete have the longest summers in all of Greece making them your next destination.

    Rhodes

    Get a feel of bustling Greece by flying into Rhodes, a must-see. Rhodes not only boasts over 300 days of sunshine (will you ever want to leave?), but is also brimming with history – with its ancient castles and temples as well as its traditional tavernas beckoning you in for a raki or two.

    Karpathos

    Take your holiday off the well-trodden path, and explore this beautiful island which will keep the whole family entertained. If you like working up a sweat, or get the adrenaline going, Karpathos is an exciting place for hiking to earn that prawn saganaki or a vast array of water sports to make a splash on its stunning blue ocean.

    Crete

    It’s the largest island in Greece, and appeals to so many travellers – but that doesn’t make it too packed. Instead, Crete manages a great balance, with party goers heading to the likes of the lively Malia or those who want to roll out of bed onto a sun lounger lap up the luxury at the Creta Maris in Hersonissos. Just a short trip away is the local village of Koutoloufari, where you can enjoy the tasty cuisine or even Saradari restaurant for stunning views to go with your fresh fish.

    Sailing boats at the harbor, Sitia, Crete

    Explore the unknown

    Ignore the cookie cutter style holiday, and find your own adventure with a visit to the Sporades. The captivating beaches and crystal seas are awaiting you. All you have to do is decide what takes your fancy.

    Skiathos

    Skiathos is perfect for families or couples looking for a picturesque spot, that has plenty of food, shopping and entertainment on offer. Ideal for children of all ages, Skiathos offers a wide range of activities to keep young ones occupied, and there’s impressive evening entertainment for all. It doesn’t have to be all fancy and wine-dining, instead if barefoot luxury, is more your style, then the Princess Resort is the one for you.

    Skopelos

    This island will probably look familiar to you, after Mamma Mia was shot there several years ago and deservedly so, boasting one of the most beautiful ports in the world. Skopelos’ white-washed walls and terracotta tiles stand out, against the lush greenery and blue waters.

    Alonissos

    If you’re looking for a reset, this is a great destination to get back to nature. Alonissos is ideal if breath-taking walks through olive groves, orchards and pine forests appeal to you. It’s also a refuge for rare seabirds, dolphins as well as the Mediterranean monk seal in the National Marine Park. Marpunta Village Club is a great hotel as a base, where you can unwind as you head out to discover Ksiro’s pristine beaches or the cave which sheltered Homer’s Cyclops.

    These are just a handful of the combinations you can try to build your perfect holiday in Greece. Click here for more information on island hopping this summer.


    A Place To Visit: SantoriniA Place To Visit: SantoriniclairejrutterSailing boats at the harbor, Sitia, CreteA Place To Visit: SantoriniA Place To Visit: SantoriniclairejrutterSailing boats at the harbor, Sitia, Crete

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    (Picture: Tesco)

    In this crazy, mixed up world of Brexit and Instagram scammers, there’s one thing that has remained an unenduring constant: British people’s resentment for the price increase of Freddo bars.

    Ask any adult in the UK about that small chocolate frog and you’ll be told that back in our day, a Freddo was 10p – an appropriate price for a small treat.

    Then in 2005, disaster struck and horror reigned, as the first price hike arrived.

    By 2016, you would have to part with 25p to get your paws on a Freddo bar. In 2017, 30p. Thankfully last year the cost of a Freddo dropped back down to 25p once more, but this is still a living nightmare for anyone old enough to remember those heady days when you could get a bar of chocolate for 10p.

    But friends: Something wonderful has happened.

    Hearing our wails and whingeing, Tesco has announced that they will once again sell Freddo bars for just 10p each.

    That’s right. You can now get a Freddo for just 10p. This is huge.

    (Picture: Tesco)

    But before you parade through the streets and declare that the country is back in order, be warned: This price drop is not permanent.

    Tesco will only sell 10p Freddo bars for one week, starting today, Monday 21 January, and ending on Sunday 27 January.

    The deal is to celebrate Tesco’s 100th birthday, so the store will be doing plenty of other deals throughout the week, but it’s only the Freddo bars we’re bothered about.

    Tesco made the choice to sell Freddos for 10p after mass requests on social media. For that, we are grateful.

    Once the week is done, the price of a Freddo will return to 26p at Tesco, so we’d recommend stocking up.

    Go forth and buy as many 10p Freddos as you can afford with the contents of your piggy bank. Live like it’s the early 2000s again. Listen to Dido and Evinescence, chomp into a chocolate bar you spent just one coin on, and cast your mind back to a time when Brexit didn’t exist and Donald Trump was just a rich guy who appeared in Home Alone 2.

    Things are good again. We have joy. We have hope. We have 10p Freddos.

    MORE: A Creme Egg has been in this woman’s family since 1973

    MORE: Cadbury’s Freddo bar wins Facebook’s 10 year challenge

    MORE: I’ll keep doing my wellness routine despite what people say


    TESCO WILL SELL FREDDOS FOR 10PTESCO WILL SELL FREDDOS FOR 10PellencscottTESCO WILL SELL FREDDOS FOR 10PTESCO WILL SELL FREDDOS FOR 10Pellencscott

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Most women who have ever been on contraception know how to use the pill.

    You take it for three weeks of a month, and then give yourself a seven-day break in order to allow your body to have a period.

    But new research from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, has revealed that there is no health benefit whatsoever from taking a break from the pill every month.

    In fact, the age-old tradition was initially introduced in the hope that Catholic Church might accept it as a form of contraception.

    The new guidelines state that taking the pill every day of the year, without monthly breaks, is actually more efficient and safer.

    (Picture: Getty)

    Women have been taking the combined  contraceptive pill in this way for more than 60 years, and most of us had no idea that the Pope or the Catholic Church had anything to do with it.

    Most pill prescriptions come in packets containing 21-pills, so there aren’t enough for every day of the month. However if more women start to reject the idea of the seven-day break, then this may well have to change.

    The new contraceptive pill guidelines

    • There is no health benefit from the seven-day hormone-free interval
    • Women can safely take fewer (or no) hormone-free intervals to avoid monthly bleeds, cramps and other symptoms
    • If a hormone-free interval is taken, shortening it to four days could potentially reduce the risk of pregnancy if pills, patches or rings are missed
    • Consultations about do not necessarily have to be face-to-face; online provision
      is possible
    • At the first consultation, many women can safely be prescribed a one year supply, instead of the current three month supply

    Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, 2019

    The new Nice-approved clinical guidelines state that fewer breaks and shorter breaks could reduce the risk of pregnancy.

    Experts expect 365 day pill prescriptions – for a full year of combined hormonal contraception – to become much more widespread in the UK, if the new guidelines are followed.

    The Family Planning Association has produced a new leaflet which explains the effectiveness of combined hormonal contraception.

    MORE: Guzzling fizzy drinks during and after exercise could give you kidney disease

    MORE: Why do I love watching makeup get destroyed?

    MORE: I scissored my best friend and it ruined our relationship


    Turns out you can take the contraceptive pill every dayTurns out you can take the contraceptive pill every daynataliemorris88Turns out you can take the contraceptive pill every dayTurns out you can take the contraceptive pill every daynataliemorris88

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    CAFE LAUNCH - New cafe staffed by people with Down Syndrome launched following successful trial
    (Picture: Dan Rowlands / SWNS.com)

    Cafe 21 is a brilliant new establishment giving young adults with Down Syndrome the chance to gain some work experience.

    The cafe, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, gives workers aged between 18 and 24 opportunities to work in the kitchen and front of house, serving homemade cakes, food, hot and cold drinks, and even gifts.

    And good news – they all get paid the national living wage.

    Ailith Harley-Roberts, 47, helped to launch the cafe this month, following a successful trial week in March of last year.

    Katherine O'Donnell, 21 who has down syndrome serving a customer at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.
    Katherine O’Donnell, 21, has been working at the cafe since it opened this week (Picture: Dan Rowlands / SWNS.com)

    ‘The young people here have thrived,’ said Ailith.

    ‘When we had the trial, it was just for a week and it felt like such a shame to have to close the doors.

    ‘Since then, the charity has sought funding to re-open and I think it is brilliant we have now been able to launch. The young people here have thrived.

    ‘When we had the trial, it was just for a week and it felt like such a shame to have to close the doors.

    (L to R) Lorna Gilbert, Katie Aynsley, Katherine O'Donnell, 21 and Sunshine and Smiles charity service manager Ailith Harley-Roberts at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.
    Workers Lorna Gilbert (left), Katie Aynsley, Katherine O’Donnell, 21 and Sunshine and Smiles charity service manager Ailith Harley-Roberts (Picture: Dan Rowlands / SWNS.com)

    Cafe 21 is a permanent fixture for the next six months but Ailith and her team of helpers hope it will stay open beyond that.

    One of the workers is Kathryn O’Donnell, 21, who helps to take orders, clear tables and prepare food.

    The staff take on a number of different roles around the cafe depending on their preference.

    Katherine O'Donnell, 21 who has down syndrome serving a customer at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.
    (Picture: Dan Rowlands / SWNS.com)

    Ailith said she expects the young adults to thrive through working as part of a team of 14 staff and learn transferable skills for their future careers.

    She added: ‘Some of the staff want to be customer-facing, others love doing stock-taking or working in the back.

    ‘There is so much involved, they are learning a lot about customer service.

    ‘I have spoken to one parent who said their son has been setting his alarm each morning and can’t wait to come into work.

    ‘That is what it is all about. The support we have had is phenomenal.’

    Cafe 21 is operated by the Sunshine and Smiles project which has been funded with help from charities The Seedbed Trust and The Wesleyan Foundation.

    It’s a parent-led charity that helps children and young people across Leeds by providing speech and language therapy, regular groups, and activities, individual support and advocacy for families.

    The charity aims to raise awareness and challenge preconceptions about Down syndrome in the wider community.

    MORE: Model with Down’s Syndrome becomes brand ambassador for Benefit cosmetics

    MORE: I needed a vitiligo champion like Primark’s new model when I was a teenager

    MORE: Teen with rare condition writes, eats, brushes his teeth and cracks eggs with his feet


    CAFE LAUNCH - New cafe staffed by people with Down Syndrome launched following successful trialCAFE LAUNCH - New cafe staffed by people with Down Syndrome launched following successful trialfaimabakar1CAFE LAUNCH - New cafe staffed by people with Down Syndrome launched following successful trialKatherine O'Donnell, 21 who has down syndrome serving a customer at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.(L to R) Lorna Gilbert, Katie Aynsley, Katherine O'Donnell, 21 and Sunshine and Smiles charity service manager Ailith Harley-Roberts at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.Katherine O'Donnell, 21 who has down syndrome serving a customer at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.CAFE LAUNCH - New cafe staffed by people with Down Syndrome launched following successful trialCAFE LAUNCH - New cafe staffed by people with Down Syndrome launched following successful trialfaimabakar1CAFE LAUNCH - New cafe staffed by people with Down Syndrome launched following successful trialKatherine O'Donnell, 21 who has down syndrome serving a customer at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.(L to R) Lorna Gilbert, Katie Aynsley, Katherine O'Donnell, 21 and Sunshine and Smiles charity service manager Ailith Harley-Roberts at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.Katherine O'Donnell, 21 who has down syndrome serving a customer at 21 Co Cafe in Leeds, West Yorkshire where staff with down syndrome are employed as part of a partnership with the charity Sunshine and Smiles which helps children and young people with Down syndrome. See SWNS copy SWLEcafe: These heartwarming photographs show an inspiring young adult working at a charity cafe which has launched to help people with Down Syndrome get vital work experience. Cafe 21, ran by charity Sunshine and Smiles, gives the chance to seven young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 to work in the kitchen and front of house. They are all paid the national living wage. The cafe serves home-made cakes and food, hot and cold drinks and gifts.

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    now that summer is over, it's harder to harness that spring
    (Picture: Ella Byworth)

    Last week I paused during a time wasting scroll on Instagram on a video of Kendall Jenner.

    The youngest of the Jenner/Kardashian dynasty was wearing a white t-shirt and not much make up, looking into the camera with an earnest expression on her face and clearly ready to share her feelings. Underneath her mother, Kris, had written ‘I’m so proud of my darling @KendallJenner for being so brave and vulnerable. Seeing you share your most raw story in order to make a positive impact for so many people and help foster a positive dialogue is a testament to the incredible woman you’ve become.

    ‘Make sure to watch Kendall’s Twitter on Sunday night to find out what I’m talking about and be prepared to be moved.’

    Was Kendall perhaps going to share her own #MeToo story? Or maybe she was coming out? Perhaps she was going to share some home truths about her struggles with mental health.

    No. She was launching a marketing campaign with skincare brand Proactiv.

    Kendall Jenner sadfished us.

    Instagram Photo

    Sadfishing is when someone uses their emotional problems to hook an audience on the internet.

    There’s nothing wrong with talking about your problems online. In Kendall’s case acne, but let’s be realistic. Everything about how the Proactiv campaign was teased was designed to make people speculate about what Kendall’s big sadness might be.

    It’s not just celebs who are doing this either. Us non-famous normies are guilty of doing the exact same thing.

    You’ll have seen sadfishing happening on Facebook. Anytime someone puts ‘I’m just so done with all this’ as their Facebook status without any explanation, and then replies to anyone who asks a follow question with ‘I’ll PM you’: that’s sadfishing.

    If you’re a supermodel and influencer from the Hollywood Hills then sadfishing will make you money in #sponcon. If you’re a marketing manager from Stockon upon Tees then it’s not likely to make you cash, but will get your attention.

    I’ve always maintained that there’s nothing wrong with attention seeking because there’s nothing wrong with wanting attention. But when we start to learn that being sad equates to being validated, aren’t we going down a difficult, dangerous path?

    Of course you have every right to express your struggles on the internet, and it’s far better to do that than sit in miserable silence. But there is a difference between sharing genuine distress and sharing a glossy, highly filtered version of sadness. The former is important. The latter is a disturbing new tendency that it’s all too easy to fall into.

    I must have been about 19 the first time that I tweeted about feeling miserable. It had been a bad day, my boyfriend was ignoring me and I was fed up. So I told the internet. And within minutes I had replies from people who cared. Or at least, pretended to care in order to get more details about what was going on. ‘Is it the boyfriend?’ people asked over DM. ‘What’s going on?’ And just like that, I was hooked. All of the glorious, indulgent reassurance of emotional support from friends, without having to spend time with any actual humans.

    Sad content shares well. It’s relatable. Relatable means engaging, engaging means more followers, and more followers mean more attention.

    Time and time again I see influencers and bloggers tweeting things like ‘Today is a hard day. What’s your best trick for taking care of yourself?’ to which comes an avalanche of support, interaction and new followers. Is that really about getting tips for self care? Or is it just an easy way to interact with sympathetic followers?

    Another top trick is a beautiful but sad photo. Crying in black and white, or tastefully nude in the bath with the caption #SelfCare.

    Filtered, lit and perfect, accompanied by a hashtag about mental health. Is that an amazing piece of honesty about the struggle to stay sane in the modern age? Or is it sadfishing?

    As a nation, and perhaps as a species, we’re not good at celebrating other people. Talking about your achievements is considered to be showing off.

    So if I post a grinning selfie talking about how happy I am and how great things are going, I’ll get a few likes and a couple of comments. But if I post something pretty where I’m crying and talking about how miserable I am, the internet will open their arms to me.

    I’ll be called strong and brave, I’ll be told that I’m fighting the good fight for mental health awareness. And perhaps that’ll be true. But the message is loud and clear: being sad makes you popular. Being sad gets you attention. The internet loves you when you are sad.

    Perhaps the right answer is to share your #sadcontent without the filter, to make it real rather than shareable. Maybe we should post the picture of our bright red, blotchy crying faces, not the ones with the perfect mascara trails highlighting our cheekbones.

    No good has ever come from covering up mental illness or pretending to be fine, and not for a second would I want to return to a world where depression, mental illness or even just feeling sad is stigmatised.

    But I can’t help wondering if in our attempts to normalise sadness, we might accidentally have incentivised it, and ended up making our lives a little bit worse.

    MORE: How to be an LGBT inclusive employer

    MORE: Man asks if he’s wrong for ordering sushi in front of pregnant wife who asked him not to


    How can I delete Facebook when it has all my memories and photographs?How can I delete Facebook when it has all my memories and photographs?rebeccacnreidnow that summer is over, it's harder to harness that springHow can I delete Facebook when it has all my memories and photographs?How can I delete Facebook when it has all my memories and photographs?rebeccacnreidnow that summer is over, it's harder to harness that spring

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    Lucy (left), Claudia (middle) and Rosie (right) pictured jumping into the pool. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers
    Caption: Lucy (left), Claudia (middle) and Rosie (right) pictured jumping into the pool (Picture: MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers)

    We all want our grandparents to be proud.

    And when it gets to a certain point in life, you are bound to get asked about when you are getting married.

    It’s obviously up to you when and if you settle down but being left out of your grandparents’ display of family photographs can be hard.

    These three sisters knew they didn’t want to get married but they decided they didn’t want to be left out of their Nana’s esteemed photo wall any longer so they staged a fake £112 self-marriage ceremony.

    Workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, wore elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only 30 AUD (£17).

    Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy’s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool.

    Lucy, Claudia and Rosie posing with their friends at their wedding. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers
    Lucy, Claudia and Rosie posing with their friends at their wedding (Picture: MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers)

    Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother.

    The three sisters say they don’t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual.

    Altogether, they only spent 200 AUD (£112) on the wedding.

    ‘None of us are married and our grandmother has photos on her wall of all our cousins on their wedding days or with their partners,’ Lucy said.

    ‘So, we decided to stage a wedding with the sole purpose of getting our photos on our Nana’s wall. It was a surprise.

    ‘We bought dresses off gumtree for about thirty dollars each and decided since it’s unlikely we’ll ever actually get married for real, we may as well do it right.

    ‘We invited friends and decorated my apartment building’s rooftop area a little. We ordered a few boxes of Domino’s pizza and drank lovely rosé all afternoon.

    ‘The best part was that our friends just dressed up, came along and fully participated in the whole charade – no questions asked.

    ‘They treated it with the same level of enthusiasm that you would any wedding. We never expected it to be such a wonderful day – I actually can’t imagine that I could possibly have had any more fun if it were a real wedding.

    Rosie (left), Lucy (middle) and Claudia (right) pictured in their wedding dresses. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers
    Rosie (left), Lucy (middle) and Claudia (right) pictured in their wedding dresses (Picture: MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers)

    ‘We had a little ceremony; my friend Astin acted as the celebrant. She married us each, “Lucy, do you take yourself to be your lawful wedded wife…” etc.

    ‘She actually said a very beautiful thing when beginning the ceremony. She said, “we are gathered here today because these ladies make the most out of life and really live it, and that’s something worth celebrating”.

    ‘We found it funny because we get a lot of questions from the family about, “when are you getting married?” or, “why haven’t you settled down?” because all our cousins are married or heading that way.

    ‘Nana’s photo wall had no photo of us, because all of the pics of her grandkids were of their weddings. So, we thought we’d fit the theme of the photo wall.

    Lucy???s nana posing next to her wall with the wedding pictures. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers
    Lucy’s nana posing next to her wall with the wedding pictures (Picture: MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers)

    ‘Originally we only planned to take photos of us in our wedding dresses, however we thought we may as well do the full wedding because it may be our only chance to have one.’

    Lucy explains that they aren’t entirely convinced about the concept of marriage, particularly society’s perception of it.

    ‘I’m not sold on the institution of marriage. I’m not concerned that it’s my last chance to get married, I’m rather disinterested in marriage itself,’ Lucy said.

    ‘I think it’s outdated, and the divorce statistics alone indicate that the promise of forever is not particularly natural or healthy.

    ‘The only person you’re ever guaranteed to wake up with every morning of your life is you. So, you’d best be good to yourself, happy with your own company and strong enough to know when to walk away from a relationship with someone else that isn’t serving you.

    ‘I’m not closed off to relationships – just extraordinarily picky. Because I can be. Because I’m not afraid of being alone.

    ‘As my Instagram caption says, “turns out, you can have a lovely wedding without the unpleasant marriage part.”

    ‘Nana doesn’t mind if we get married or not – the sole purpose of this was to make a joke about what it takes to get up on her photo wall – she loved the photos and found it particularly funny, the lengths we went to.’

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    All the Single BridesAll the Single Brideslauraabernethy6Lucy (left), Claudia (middle) and Rosie (right) pictured jumping into the pool. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy IversLucy, Claudia and Rosie posing with their friends at their wedding. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy IversRosie (left), Lucy (middle) and Claudia (right) pictured in their wedding dresses. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy IversLucy???s nana posing next to her wall with the wedding pictures. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy IversAll the Single BridesAll the Single Brideslauraabernethy6Lucy (left), Claudia (middle) and Rosie (right) pictured jumping into the pool. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy IversLucy, Claudia and Rosie posing with their friends at their wedding. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy IversRosie (left), Lucy (middle) and Claudia (right) pictured in their wedding dresses. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy IversLucy???s nana posing next to her wall with the wedding pictures. GLAMOROUS PHOTOS reveal three sisters participating in a fake ??112 self-marriage ceremony in a bid to get on their nana???s esteemed photo wall and show the world that you don???t need a man or a huge budget to have a fairy-tale wedding. Stunning pictures show workshop facilitator, Lucy Ivers (33), and her sisters Rosie (29) and Claudia (26), from Brisbane, Australia, in elaborate wedding dresses which they bought from Gumtree for only ??17 (30 AUD). Incredible pictures show all 12 guests and the brides posing together on the rooftop area of Lucy???s apartment and the three sisters posing next to each other in their dresses in a pool. Lucy, Rosie and Claudia all agreed to organise a self-marriage ceremony on November 10, 2018, which was ordained by their friend Astin, as a joke for their grandmother. The three sisters say they don???t plan to get married traditionally, due to their disinterest in the ritual. Altogether, they only spent ??112 (200 AUD) on the wedding. MDWfeatures / Lucy Ivers

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    What many thought would be a coming out story, ended up being an advert partnering with skincare brand ProActiv ( Credit: Getty/ Kris Jenner)

    ‘Join Veganuary’ were the first words I saw in 2019. Flicking through New Year’s Eve pictures, the campaign to become greener in January wasn’t regarding an animal-free diet, but a call for ‘clean beauty’ and clearer skin.

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    Looking at the countless, almost frantic messages about how to get an acne-free complexion after the holidays, it seems the goal to have perfect skin has become the new version of the age-old resolution to ‘get fit’. And it’s really not a surprise.

    Living in the age of Instagram, where everyone is sharing their beautiful poreless and baby smooth skin – and answering advice on how they achieved it with [insert example product here] – the rise of skincare has been community-led.

    Whether that’s a #shelfie of your recent nighttime routine – all beautifully packaged, of course – or showing off how to use a jade roller, skincare trends are becoming as buzzworthy as beauty or fashion always were. But this gives weight to the idea that problematic skin must be erased, with no scars to show they were present in the first place.

    There may indeed be skincare tricks to help calm down ‘problem areas’, and some may argue that this offers psychological benefits, but the problem with having unattainable skincare standards is that it doesn’t factor in real life.

    From how clean the air is around you to a varying diet, stress from work and your personal life, breakups, pregnancy, hormones and the old chestnut that is genetics – it’s all replaced with the idea that this one toner can be the fix you need.

    Having a dermatologist on hand, knowing what salicylic acid does and making sure you pack your face mist on a flight has become the new currency for a higher status.

    However, skincare, just like makeup, is a matter of trial and error. Having ‘normal’, ‘combination’ and ‘oily’ skin is the bare minimum to know about how your face reacts to different products, therefore, in order to try out different oils, serums, and acids, you must have the funds to do so. Having bad skin is essentially equated with being poor and not looking after yourself: a sin in the world of self-care.

    Though taking care of your skin can be a personally positive act, idolising flawless skin will surely add to one’s anxiety, especially young girls going through puberty whose skin will see so much change. Their insecurities are only increased by seeing a larger community online appreciate those with unblemished skin.

    For example, Kendall Jenner recently said in an Instagram video that she was ready to share her raw story and that ‘I can help you and it’s okay and I experience it and I’m very normal’ while her mother, Kris Jenner also shared the post saying ‘I’m so proud of my darling Kendall for being so brave and vulnerable… #changetheconversation’. What many thought would be a coming out story, ended up being a advert partnering with ProActiv.

    In the video, Jenner explains that after experiencing both the backlash and support for having acne publicly, Jenner still wanted it gone and therefore her solution to her millions of followers was to sell a skincare product, even though previous quotes suggest this may not have been her only route to clear skin. More importantly, to truly change the conversation, Kendall Jenner could have taught the people following her to love and accept their skin as is it.

    The trap we have fallen into with having unattainable skincare standards is that it’s an added pressure which tends to fall primarily upon women – to look unfazed by the ups and downs of life and ignoring the fact that even with the perfect skincare routine, you can still break out.

    With this new wave of wellness obsession, it has become acceptable to spend so much time and money on making sure your skin has the right amount of dewiness because so many of us are doing it in the name of ‘health’. When in actual fact, no skincare routine or product works on every single person, or in other words is ‘the cure’.

    The real problem with unattainable skincare standards is that it makes acne feel alien when it’s really just regular. But wait, what’s that? Another newsletter telling me what products I should buy so I can get clear skin in time for Valentine’s Day.

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    Laura did a tandem skydive in September 2018. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura Beck
    Laura, 29, was paralysed in 2016 in a car crash on her husband’s birthday (Picture: MDWfeatures / Laura Beck)

    Laura Beck from Tennessee, U.S, was driving home with her husband Jacob after celebrating his birthday in 2016 when they had a horrific car accident.

    The car flipped three times and crashed into a tree. Laura, 29, hit her head on the roof of the car, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob was unhurt.

    Laura’s spinal cord was punctured, meaning she could no longer walk. Doctors had to remove shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together.

    After the accident, Laura woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs.

    Now, two years after the life-changing event, Laura has taken on a skydive to honour the adventure-seeking life she led before the accident.

    Laura with one of her dogs, Strider. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura Beck
    Laura, 29, with one of her dog, Strider, on a camping trip (Picture: MDWfeatures / Laura Beck)

    Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges.

    ‘One of my most vivid memories from the ICU was my oldest sister coming to the side of my bed and I looked at her and said, “I don’t want to be an old hag in a wheelchair”.

    ‘She had tears and said, “then don’t Laura, you get to choose who you are going to be in this wheelchair.” After she said that, my whole perspective changed. We get to choose how we respond to the happenings in our life, whether good or bad.’

    Laura in hospital, the first time she was sat upright following her accident. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura Beck
    Laura in hospital, the first time she was sat upright following her accident.(Picture: MDWfeatures / Laura Beck)
    Laura thought her life would be over when she was told she'd never walk again, but in September 2018 she jumped out of a plane as part of a tandem skydive. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to
    Laura thought her life would be over when she was told she’d never walk again, but in 2018 she jumped out of a plane as part of a tandem skydive (Picture: MDWfeatures / Laura Beck)

    Rehab was a testing and draining time for Laura but she had a strong support system.

    A year after her injury, she was taught how to sit properly on her wheelchair and she was able to get back to some of the things she loved before her accident.

    At the end of last year, Laura and Jacob drove through more than four American states, staying in their tent with their two dogs.

    Laura wanted to show others that it’s possible to find positive outcomes in difficult situations as she refuses to be defined by her disability.

    ‘We decided there’s no reason we can’t do everything that we wanted to do before the injury, it’s just going to look a little different,’ she added.

    ‘I didn’t know what truly living felt like until I jumped out of the plane, it was one of the best days of my life.

    Laura and Jacob have two dogs, whom they love dearly. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura Beck
    Laura with her two dogs on a camping trip (Picture: MDWfeatures / Laura Beck)

    ‘Getting up to 15,000 feet in the plane was just a teaser. Anyone who loves adventure should try to do it at least once in their life because it was worth the fear.

    ‘The message that I want others to see is that hard things happen to all of us. We may not fully understand another’s battles, but we are all here for each other.

    ‘The most important thing in life I believe is to find joy during whatever life deals you. It’s not easy to do so, but I believe it is possible for everyone.

    ‘Don’t let life tell you that you can’t do something. Find the humour and joy in all that life tried to break you with – that will always be what I say has saved Jacob and I from letting life destroy us.’

     

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    sec_48577308-2718sec_48577308-2718faimabakar1Laura did a tandem skydive in September 2018. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura BeckLaura with one of her dogs, Strider. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura BeckLaura in hospital, the first time she was sat upright following her accident. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura BeckLaura thought her life would be over when she was told she'd never walk again, but in September 2018 she jumped out of a plane as part of a tandem skydive. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them toLaura and Jacob have two dogs, whom they love dearly. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura Becksec_48577308-2718sec_48577308-2718faimabakar1Laura did a tandem skydive in September 2018. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura BeckLaura with one of her dogs, Strider. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura BeckLaura in hospital, the first time she was sat upright following her accident. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura BeckLaura thought her life would be over when she was told she'd never walk again, but in September 2018 she jumped out of a plane as part of a tandem skydive. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them toLaura and Jacob have two dogs, whom they love dearly. CHATTANOOGA, USA: A DEVASTATING car accident left this woman with a lifelong spinal cord injury but she isn???t letting this stop her from living life to the fullest and has since SKYDIVED out of a plane despite being confined to a wheelchair. Laura Beck (29) from Chattanooga, USA, was driving home with her husband after celebrating his birthday in November 2016 at a seafood restaurant in Louisiana when their vehicle skidded over a puddle. Laura was falling asleep in the passenger seat while her husband Jacob drove them home, but she woke up clutching onto the dashboard as she felt the car skidding out of control. The car flipped three times and hit a tree, and the roof of the car crushed Laura???s head, leaving her paralysed from the chest down. Jacob, who was uninjured, called the emergency services after fearing that Laura was dead. She was transported to hospital immediately where they discovered that her spine had punctured her spinal cord. Laura was in the ICU for 10 days, followed by another week in hospital after doctors removed shards of bone from her neck to fuse her spine together. She woke up with almost no movement in her hands, core or legs. Both Laura and Jacob have always been lovers of the outdoors, so being told she could never walk again was difficult for Laura to digest initially, until she decided that being quadriplegic didn???t have to stop her from achieving her goals. Immediately after leaving the hospital, Laura went to a rehabilitation facility to learn about her new limitations and to rebuild what strength she could. For a year, Laura dealt with her new lifestyle until she was ready to face new challenges. In September 2018 Laura went skydiving, a memory she will cherish forever. Her and Jacob also plan on renovating a camper van to accommodate Laura???s wheelchair, enabling them to still go travelling through America. MDWfeatures / Laura Beck

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    Parents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKS
    (Picture: Tobar)

    Christmas may have been and gone, but kids might already be pestering their parents for new toys.

    And this robotic llama that dances to music and even twerks is apparently going to a must-have toy this year.

    The Pets Alive Boppi is a llama doll that swishes its neck round in time to music and vigorously shakes its behind.

    Ahead of the 2019 Toy Fair, experts reckon that the llama is set to become one of the must-have toys of the year.

    Packaging refers to the doll as ‘Boppi the booty shaking llama’ – which runs off four Double A batteries.

    Tobar
    (Picture: Tobar)

    Zuru, the company behind the doll, have created a range of ‘living’ animals, from snakes, fish to turtles, but according to experts, the £25 llama is set to be the favourite.

    The llama blasts three different songs and jumps about, and also responds to songs played on YouTube. People think it might become as popular as Furbies when it finally hits the shelves in June.

    The Zuru Pets Alive range is distributed in the UK by Norwich based firm Tobar.

    A spokesperson for the company said: ‘Inspired by kids and imaginative play, Zuru is one of the fastest growing toy companies in the world and is known for their agility, creativity and new-age manufacturing techniques.

    TobarParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKS
    (Picture: Tobar)

    ‘The company that started in New Zealand, now employs more than 4,000 staff across 18 offices, produces 400,000 toys a day and distributes to most major retailers in over 120 countries.’

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    Parents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKSParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKShattiegladwellmetroParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKSTobarTobarParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKSParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKSParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKShattiegladwellmetroParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKSTobarTobarParents across the country will soon be pestered for the must-have toy of 2019 - a robotic llama that dances to music and even TWERKS

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