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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair
    (Picture: Chloe Carr /SWNS.COM)

    Something that will give us perfect hair with minimum effort is the dream.

    So when Chloe Carr, 19, received Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother, she was pretty excited.

    According to the website, the device works by ‘drawing hair into the ceramic curling barrel, gently heating and curling hair, to release healthy looking curls’.

    You basically just hold the device and it does the work for you.

    But Chloe was left humiliated and in pain after she claims the device failed to release her hair – and pulled out a huge clump on the back of her head.

    The teenager was left with a pile of her long hair on her bed, and burst into tears.

    Chloe,from Bradford, West Yorks., said: ‘I was screaming. It was really painful.

    ‘I was so embarrassed I didn’t want to show anybody. I just stayed at home and cried.

    Student Chloe Carr ,19, who claims her Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers left her with a BALD PATCH. See SWNS story SWSYcurlers.;.A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair -- leaving her with a BALD PATCH.Chloe Carr, 19, received the Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother.According to the website, the device works by "drawing hair into the ceramic curling barrel, gently heating and curling hair, to release healthy looking curls".But Chloe was left humiliated and in pain after she claims the device failed to release her hair - and pulled out a huge clump on the back of her head.
    Chloe Carr ,19, who claims her Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers left her with a bald patch (Picture: Chloe Carr /SWNS.COM)

    ‘I was quite concerned about it burning my scalp because it was quite hot.

    ‘I turned the temperature down but I could hear it pulling the hair out of my head.

    ‘I didn’t want to turn them off because then I couldn’t press the error button.

    ‘It’s still a bit tender but bearable; it’s embarrassing more than anything.

    ‘I just want this to be a warning to others. With the pain and trauma it’s caused me, I just don’t want it to happen to anyone else.’

    The bald patch that The Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers student Chloe Carr,19, claims caused.See SWNS story SWSYcurlers.;.A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair -- leaving her with a BALD PATCH.Chloe Carr, 19, received the Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother.According to the website, the device works by "drawing hair into the ceramic curling barrel, gently heating and curling hair, to release healthy looking curls".But Chloe was left humiliated and in pain after she claims the device failed to release her hair - and pulled out a huge clump on the back of her head.
    The bald patch (Picture: Chloe Carr /SWNS.COM)

    Chloe, who studies fashion business management at Manchester Metropolitan University, used the curlers for the first time before going out with friends on Friday.

    She said: ‘I went through all the instructions and it said not to use more than 3cm of hair at a time.

    ‘I was trying to do it with that amount, and my hair kept getting caught in it. It was coming up with an ‘ER2’ error message.

    ‘It said if the error came up, it meant you had too much hair in there, so I started using smaller portions.

    The chunk of hair that student Chloe Carr,19, claims was ripped out by her Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers .See SWNS story SWSYcurlers.;.A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair -- leaving her with a BALD PATCH.Chloe Carr, 19, received the Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother.According to the website, the device works by "drawing hair into the ceramic curling barrel, gently heating and curling hair, to release healthy looking curls".But Chloe was left humiliated and in pain after she claims the device failed to release her hair - and pulled out a huge clump on the back of her head.
    The chunk of hair that student Chloe claims was ripped out (Picture: Chloe Carr /SWNS.COM

    ‘I put my hair into the curler and pressed the button. It got caught again, so I pressed the error button but it didn’t let it go but pulled it in tighter.

    ‘It was pulling more hair in from other areas.

    ‘Every time I tried to release the hair or reset the error, the curler would suck up more and more hair leaving the curler pressed directly against my scalp.’

    After cancelling her night out, she took some painkillers and went to bed.

    Chloe contacted Remington to complain about the product, which her grandmother bought from Debenhams for £45 – reduced from £90.

    Chloe also wrote about her ordeal on Facebook and said other people commented they had experienced similar problems with the product.

    Remington are in the process of ‘reviewing’ Chloe’s complaint and are in touch with her following the ordeal.

    Sarah Harding, marketing manager at Remington said: ‘Customer satisfaction and experience is of the utmost importance to us.

    ‘We’re therefore disappointed to hear about Ms Carr’s experience.

    ‘We have been in correspondence with the customer and are reviewing her feedback as a priority.’

    MORE: TRX suspension training might be the toughest thing you can do in the gym

    MORE: Photographer captures people’s heartbreaking final moments with their pets


    sec_48580366-3ad4sec_48580366-3ad4lauraabernethy6A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hairStudent Chloe Carr ,19, who claims her Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers left her with a BALD PATCH. See SWNS story SWSYcurlers.;.A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair -- leaving her with a BALD PATCH.Chloe Carr, 19, received the Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother.According to the website, the device works by sec_48580366-3ad4sec_48580366-3ad4lauraabernethy6A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hairStudent Chloe Carr ,19, who claims her Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers left her with a BALD PATCH. See SWNS story SWSYcurlers.;.A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair -- leaving her with a BALD PATCH.Chloe Carr, 19, received the Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother.According to the website, the device works by "drawing hair into the ceramic curling barrel, gently heating and curling hair, to release healthy looking curls".But Chloe was left humiliated and in pain after she claims the device failed to release her hair - and pulled out a huge clump on the back of her head.The bald patch that The Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers student Chloe Carr,19, claims caused.See SWNS story SWSYcurlers.;.A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair -- leaving her with a BALD PATCH.Chloe Carr, 19, received the Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother.According to the website, the device works by "drawing hair into the ceramic curling barrel, gently heating and curling hair, to release healthy looking curls".But Chloe was left humiliated and in pain after she claims the device failed to release her hair - and pulled out a huge clump on the back of her head.The chunk of hair that student Chloe Carr,19, claims was ripped out by her Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers .See SWNS story SWSYcurlers.;.A student is devastated after she claims her new automatic hair curlers ripped out chunks of her hair -- leaving her with a BALD PATCH.Chloe Carr, 19, received the Remington Keratin Protect auto curlers as a Christmas present from her grandmother.According to the website, the device works by "drawing hair into the ceramic curling barrel, gently heating and curling hair, to release healthy looking curls".But Chloe was left humiliated and in pain after she claims the device failed to release her hair - and pulled out a huge clump on the back of her head.

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    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Charlotte shares a three-bedroom house in Balham with her boyfriend and two friends (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Sure, watching Marie Kondo make people chuck stuff away is cool, but have you ever tried just looking at the reality of people’s living spaces?

    That’s far more fun, if you ask us.

    That’s a tiny part of why we launched What I Rent, a weekly series that takes you inside a different person’s rented property, mould, damp, and all.

    The other, larger part is because renting can be bloody awful, and we reckon it’s important to get real about what people are paying and what they’re getting in return.

    So come for the toothbrush shots, stay for the misery of paying hundreds just so you can live near a Tube station.

    This week we’re hanging out with Charlotte Mullin, who you might also know as Chuck Draws Things. She lives in Balham in a shared house with her boyfriend and two friends.

    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    She pays £650 a month for a room with her boyfriend (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Hi, Char! How much do you pay to live here? 

    £650 a month, and around £50 a month in bills.

    And what do you get for that?

    It’s three bedroom, two bathroom, with one bathroom as an en-suite.

    How did you end up living with this group?

    I’ve lived here around six months now.

    I live with my boyfriend, who I’ve been with for almost three years and lived with for around half of that; his friend from uni, who lived with us in our last flat for a year, and his friend from work.

    They’re all great to live with, except for the fact I’m constantly outnumbered when it comes to what’s on telly, which is always football.

    I think one of my housemates found it on Rightmove, or one of those kinds of sites.

    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Charlotte says it’s the biggest place she’s rented (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Do you like where you live?

    I love where I live! My flat is in a quiet residential area, but it’s only five minutes walk from the tube and Balham high road, which has loads of good shops and restaurants.

    I’m also really close to Wandsworth Common, which is a great spot for when we puppysit for our friends!

    Do you feel like you have enough space?

    Definitely – it’s the largest flat I’ve ever lived in.

    How have you made the house feel like a home?

    Lots of books, blankets, and plants! I’ve got cacti and two succulents.

    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    So she’s happy to put up with a 40 minute commute (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Do you have any issues with the house?

    Nothing major, it’s pretty great! The only thing I can think of is I have the upstairs bedroom and it takes ages for hot water to come up to our bathroom.

    Any plans to move again?

    I don’t want to move again for a good long while, this place is perfect.

    If I did have to move, I’d maybe like something a bit closer to my work – it’s about forty mins on the tube or an hour’s cycle, which isn’t bad, but could be a bit better! I’m lazy.

    And… what about buying a place?

    *laughs in millennial*

    Shall we have a look around Charlotte’s shared house?

    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    The living room has plenty of space for the four people living in the house (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    The only downside of house-sharing? Charlotte is outnumbered when it comes to what’s on the TV (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of DVDs in the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    A strong DVD collection (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    And a fancy fireplace (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Here’s the kitchen and dining area, which doubles as storage for bikes (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Nice, right? (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of spices in the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    We approve of that collection of herbs (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the hallway of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Charlotte’s room with her boyfriend is upstairs (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of shoes in the hallway of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the bedroom she shares with her boyfriend at their three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Their room has an en-suite bathroom (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' bedroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    It’s on the top floor, so it does take a while for the hot water to reach them (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    See that illustration? Charlotte did that (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of toiletries in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' en-suite bathroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Here’s their bathroom (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' en-suite bathroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    With a proper bath! (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    BALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of toothbrushes in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    What I Rent is a weekly series that’s out every Tuesday at 10am. Check back next week to have a nose around another rented property in London.

    How to get involved in What I Rent

    What I Rent is Metro.co.uk's weekly series that takes you inside the places in London people are renting, to give us all a better sense of what's normal and how much we should be paying.

    If you fancy taking part, please email whatirent@metro.co.uk.

    You'll need to have pictures taken of your kitchen, living room, bathroom, and bedroom, plus a few photos of you in your room. Make sure you get permission for your housemates!

    You'll also need to be okay with sharing how much you're paying for rent, as that's pretty important.

    MORE: What I Rent: Sharan, £675 a month to share a two-bedroom flat in Stoke Newington

    MORE: What I Rent: Sam and Ollie, £1,700 a month for a two-bedroom flat in Hoxton

    MORE: What I Rent: Carlie and her daughter, £1,500 a month for a two-bedroom flat in Streatham Hill


    What I Rent: BalhamWhat I Rent: BalhamellencscottBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of DVDs in the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of spices in the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the hallway of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of shoes in the hallway of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the bedroom she shares with her boyfriend at their three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' bedroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of toiletries in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' en-suite bathroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' en-suite bathroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of toothbrushes in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandWhat I Rent: BalhamWhat I Rent: BalhamellencscottBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the living room at her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of DVDs in the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the living room of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of spices in the kitchen of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of the hallway of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of shoes in the hallway of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin is pictured in the bedroom she shares with her boyfriend at their three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' bedroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of toiletries in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' en-suite bathroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM Tenant Charlotte Mullin and her boyfriends' en-suite bathroom is pictured in her three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandBALHAM, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 17TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BALHAM General view of toothbrushes in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Charlotte Mullin's three-bedroomed flat in Balham, London, 17th January 2019. Charlotte and her boyfriend pay ?650 each, whilst her two other flatmates pay ?700 each, not including bills. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland

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    It might be called a catwalk but it was a dog who stole the show at this fashion event.

    The clip, recorded at designer Rohit Bal’s catwalk show in Mumbai, shows how the street dog wandered in during the traditional clothes showcase.

    Stray dog steals the spotlight at fashion show Credit: Reuters
    (Picture: Reuters)

    He had a good sniff around and wagged his tail enthusiastically.

    He just wanted to join in the fun but the models weren’t quite sure what to do.

    One had the right idea and gave him a little pat on the head before another model scratched behind his ears when the next group joined the stage.

    Eventually, some of the models broke from their pose to shoo him away.

    But his brief unexpected interruption made him the star of the show.

    He might have caused a little bit of disruption but he is still a very good boy.

    MORE: What I Rent: Charlotte, £650 a month for a room in a three-bedroom house in Balham

    MORE: Woman claims she was left with a bald patch after new curler ripped her hair out


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  • 01/22/19--02:57: 11 fun brands that are vegan
  • With Greggs vegan sausage roll making waves and more omnivores than ever embracing a meat-free month for Veganuary, it’s clear that eating vegan has gone mainstream.

    A fully vegan lifestyle might not be achievable or desirable for all – or forever – but while you’re on the meat-free wagon, you still want to have fun foods that taste good.

    We scoured the market to find fun vegan products that can keep you interested and committed throughout the rest of January and beyond.

    1 Freedom beer, mixed case of 24 £37.99

    freedom bottles-9106
    Freedom Beers

    Did you know lots of beer and wines are filtered with the swim bladders of fish? The dried fish bladder – called isinglass – does not end up in the drink itself, but instead is used during the manufacturing process, rendering many drinks non-vegan. Last year Guinness declared it was totally vegan, after adapting its global operation to remove fish from the filtering process, and many big brands are looking to follow suit.

    In the boutique beer market, we are pleased to say we have found a beer brand that is made completely free from animal products. Freedom Brewery beers are fish-free, and are one of the few on the market that are.

    Not only that they are all vegan, all of their products are produced naturally and responsibly. Brewed using natural spring water from their own source and one of their beers, the Helles lager, is Soil Association certified organic.

    Freedom Brewery

    2 Hippeas organic chick pea puffs, around £1

    We are addicted to these. Like posh Wotsits, but with more crunch and more subtle flavouring – we have been known to motor through three bags of these on the hop.

    Flavours include Sweet & Smokin’ and Salt and Vinegar (our favourites), Cheese & Love, Spicy Hot, In Herbs We Trust and Far Out Fajita.

    Hippeas
    Hippeas chick pea crisps – it’s a ‘yes peas’ from us

    They are high in fibre (1.6g per bag), a source of protein (3g per bag) and only have 90 calories per bag They are a brilliant snack for little ones as well as big ones.

    As a feel-good side note, Hippeas work with Farm Africa on projects including donating money from packs sold and working to help farmers and their families earn a fair income. You can get them from all regular supermarkets – Sainsbury’s, Ocado, Asda and Tesco sell them, as well as Whole Foods, planetorganic.com, Holland & Barrett and amazon.co.uk (and more!).

    Hippeas

     

    3 Beyond Meat Burger, £5.50 (pack of two)

    chipotle guac vegan burger-42be

    Cult US brand Beyond Meat is responsible for this infamous bleeding vegan burger. When we heard about it, of course, we wanted it. But demand for Beyond Burgers in the US was such that its arrival to the UK last year was delayed due to supply issues. Fortunately, it’s now available in select stores – you can find the burgers, along with mince, in the frozen section.

    Made entirely from plants using a combination of yellow peas, coconut and rapeseed oil, potato starch, it also has beetroot juice to create the burger’s signature “beet blood”. This burger is the closest we’ve had to the real thing. You will have read that it sizzles when it cooks – and it really does.

    If you don’t fancy cooking it yourself, Honest Burger is currently serving up a delicious chipotle and guacamole vegan burger with a Beyond Meat patty.

    Tesco

     

    4 Vegan fish, £3.50

    Vegan fish is the latest vegan trend going mainstream so we had to add this to our list. Sainsbury’s will be expanding their frozen range and adding Sophie’s Kitchen this month.

    So what goes into a vegan shrimp we hear you ask? The main ingredient to create that shrimpy texture is konjac, an Asian herb that ca be made into a high-fibre corn that has a uniquely firm yet yielding texture. It is mixed with grains, some potato starch and whole wheat flour, and given colour with paprika and turmeric.

    sophies-kitchen-vegan-shrimp-21ce

    Sophie’s Kitchen launched 8 years ago and made it their mission to make plant-based seafood more accessible.

    For those that miss the texture and taste of prawns, this is as close to a tasting the real thing as you’re going to get – texture is key and Sophie’s Kitchen have nailed it. Vegan shrimp anyone?

    Sophie’s Kitchen 

    5 Sheese (Vegan cheese), £2.90

    Sheese, made from coconut oil, is free from lactose, gluten, vegan and kosher and produced using an animal-free process. It is perfect for anyone looking to substitute dairy in their diet.

    sheese-e495
    Bute Islands Sheese

    It’s surprisingly good too, having won awards for Bute Island foods, who have been making the Strong Cheddar Style sheese since 1988. It’s ideal grated on top of a pizza or on a jacket potato, as well as in recipes like Mac & Sheese. The recipe has been tweaked slightly since its origin and it cuts smoothly, even though it’s creamier, making it more satisfying and like the dairy equivalent in terms of texture as well.

    Bute Island

     

    6 Larabar Apple Pie Bars (x3), £2.64

    Fans of popular US brand LÄRABAR can rejoice as it is due to make its UK debut later this month in Sainsbury’s and is available on Amazon now.

    lÄrabar-5ef9
    LÄRABAR

    The brand was founded by female entrepreneur Lara Merriken in 2000 with the goal of providing people with delicious tasting ‘food made from food’ and has firmly become a household name in the USA and beyond, with a huge celebrity fan base.

    Three delicious varieties from the Original LÄRABAR range will be available, including apple cinnamon, banana choc chip and peanut butter choc chip.

    Amazon

    7 Booja-Booja ice cream, 500ml, £5.99

    We had to have dessert in this list and this brand is one of the best out there.

    booja -a7b0
    Booja-Booja’s sensational ice cream

    Booja-Booja has been satisfying chocolate cravings for dairy-free chocolate lovers since 1999 and they have been winning awards for innovation for their range of dairy-free ice cream and truffles ever since. The brand is vegan, organic, gluten free, soya free, and dairy free – but very much not taste-free.

    Booja-Booja

    8 Nailberry nail varnish, £14.50

    It’s not just food and drinks products that are getting the vegan make-over, beauty and fashion brands are taking note too.

    nailberry-b6be

    We love the award winning Nailberry range of nail polishes – the winter shades are lush. Unfortunately, nail polish brands are often tested on animals and and contain harsh chemical ingredients. Rest assured this one is not only cruelty-free, non-toxic it’s also ‘breathable’. Time for a guilt free mani!

    Visit Nailberry

    9 Vegan shoes, from £25

    Marks & Spencer has really invested in the vegan market this year, with the launch of both the Plant Kitchen vegan range – 50 vegan food choices, from speedy midweek suppers to lunch on the go – and the launch of an impressive 350-strong range of vegan shoes this spring.

    m&s vegan shoes-d265
    M&S vegan shoes – launching in spring

    M&S

    10 Le Labo perfume, £125

    Smell divine with Le Labo. 

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    Le Labo signature Santal 33 vegan and unisex scent

    Perfume can be another tricky one for vegans to find, since they must avoid fragrances made with extracts of milk, honey, leather and beeswax, as well as a few very high-end parfumeurs who still use real musk – secretions from animals used to mark their territories – as a fixative to make the scent last longer. Fortunately, this beauty is 100% animal free. Spritz away safe in the knowledge that the signature Santal 33 or Bergamote 22 are completely vegan.

    Liberty London

     

     

    11 Last but not least… The Greggs Vegan Sausage Roll, £1

    Can you even call it a sausage? Who asked for this?? Debate around the launch of Greggs vegan sausage roll has been heated. Love it or hate it, just like Marmite (which is incidentally also vegan) it’s had the nation divided.

    3290-2023
    Greggs hotly debated vegan sausage roll  

    Designed to taste as similar to the classic Greggs sausage roll as possible, it has 96 layers of puff pastry, with no milk glaze, which makes it slightly less crisp but (in our opinion) no less delicious, wrapped around a Quorn sausage flavoured with some secret blend of spices. No, Greggs wouldn’t tell us what they were – we asked. Finally vegans can walk into Greggs (sadly not all Greggs yet) and come out with a sausage roll. What a time to be alive.

    Greggs Vegan Sausage Rolls

    MORE: What’s actually in the Greggs vegan sausage roll?


    chipotle guac vegan burger-42bechipotle guac vegan burger-42befarahyaqubfreedom bottles-9106Hippeassophies-kitchen-vegan-shrimp-21cesheese-e495lÄrabar-5ef9booja -a7b0nailberry-b6bem&s vegan shoes-d265santal-33-26e83290-2023chipotle guac vegan burger-42bechipotle guac vegan burger-42befarahyaqubfreedom bottles-9106Hippeassophies-kitchen-vegan-shrimp-21cesheese-e495lÄrabar-5ef9booja -a7b0nailberry-b6bem&s vegan shoes-d265santal-33-26e83290-2023

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    Rachael goes for hikes of up to 20km in the buff (Collect/PA Real Life)
    Rachael started hiking naked after a breakup (Picture: PA Real Life)

    How do you deal with a breakup?

    Ice cream? Watching horror movies? Writing a list of all the ways your ex was actually human trash?

    Rachael Fitzpatrick took a different approach – and we’re big fans.

    After breaking up with the man she planned to marry, she made a resolution: to say ‘yes’ to everything.

    So began her Yes Year, with the goal of trying new things and taking on any opportunity that came her way.

    One of those new things was hiking naked.

    Rachael had hiked before, having gone for long strolls in the outback since childhood, but she usually did it with clothes on.

    Now she sets off into the wilds every weekend without a scrap of clothing, documenting her naked travels on Instagram.

    Rachael is now happily single and says that she is more confident than ever because of her nude hikes (Collect/PA Real Life)
    Following the end of a six year relationship, Rachael started her ‘Yes Year’ (Picture: PA Real Life)

    ‘It’s the feeling of total liberation that I love,’ she says. ‘The feeling of being completely free and close to nature – it’s just awesome.

    ‘Going out into the big wide world and baring yourself totally can be a little daunting at first, but once you’ve gotten over that initial fear it is so rewarding.

    ‘It really helped me to become more comfortable in my own skin and about who I am – and I know that I’m a much stronger person for it.’

    Rachael is now an ambassador for body positivity campaign Get Naked Australia, and credits her naked hiking as a major factor in her confidence.

    Rachael is now an ambassador for the body positivity campaign Get Naked Australia (Collect/PA Real Life)
    She tried hiking naked with a friend and fell in love with the feeling (Picture: PA Real Life)

    It all began back in 2016, when her six-year relationship came to an end. Rachael decided that a Year of Yes would be the best way to get over any heartbreak.

    She went on a hiking holiday with her friend Mark in 2017, and on a secluded path up in the hills discovered the joy of getting her kit off.

    ‘Mark was some way ahead of me,’ Rachael remembers. ‘Then when I eventually caught up with him I found that he had taken all of his clothes off. “Come on,” he said, “what are you waiting for?” And so I took mine off too – and found that I loved it.’

    Rachael goes nude hiking with friends and even her mum (Collect/PA Real Life)
    She says the hobby has given her a new love for her body (Picture: PA Real Life)

    Her love for naked hiking caught on, and now she often takes friends and family members along for the journey.

    There are certain things Rachael has to consider when hiking out in Australia without the protection of clothes.

    ‘I obviously have to lotion myself up quite thoroughly because the sun can be really strong,’ she says.

    ‘And there is of course the danger too of snakes and spiders, with which I have had many encounters throughout the years I have been hiking.

    Rachael documents her bare-bottomed exploits in the photos she posts on Instagram (Collect/PA Real Life)
    Rachael wants to encourage others to give it a go (Picture: PA Real Life)

    ‘But for the most part they aren’t too much of a problem – though I know I am probably a bit too blase about it all.’

    She hasn’t had any negative feedback from fellow walkers who come across her striding along naked, and wants to encourage anyone tempted to give it a go.

    ‘I came across a lady a few months ago who saw me strolling along naked and we got chatting about why I do it and how great it makes me feel,’ says Rachael.

    ‘Then a couple of weeks later she sent me a picture of herself on a naked hike too, saying that I had inspired her – and that felt really great.

    ‘Some people might think it’s a little strange to go wandering around naked all the time in public, but just from my experience alone it has been so helpful in making me a stronger, happier woman.

    ‘And if it can be a help for other people too then I want to share that.’

    MORE: You can swim naked in a vat of beer with unlimited booze on tap in Iceland

    MORE: It’s never okay to talk about an ex’s penis size


    PA Real Life - Rachael Fitzpatrick - Naked hikerPA Real Life - Rachael Fitzpatrick - Naked hikerellencscottRachael goes for hikes of up to 20km in the buff (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael is now happily single and says that she is more confident than ever because of her nude hikes (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael is now an ambassador for the body positivity campaign Get Naked Australia (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael goes nude hiking with friends and even her mum (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael documents her bare-bottomed exploits in the photos she posts on Instagram (Collect/PA Real Life)PA Real Life - Rachael Fitzpatrick - Naked hikerPA Real Life - Rachael Fitzpatrick - Naked hikerellencscottRachael goes for hikes of up to 20km in the buff (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael is now happily single and says that she is more confident than ever because of her nude hikes (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael is now an ambassador for the body positivity campaign Get Naked Australia (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael goes nude hiking with friends and even her mum (Collect/PA Real Life)Rachael documents her bare-bottomed exploits in the photos she posts on Instagram (Collect/PA Real Life)

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    (Picture: Getty, sixers smasey/Twitter)

    You spend your whole life thinking you know how to do things but then a pesky internet hack comes along to tell you you’ve been pooing all wrong, or not cutting apples the right way.

    The latest point of contention on the internet might send you back to the days of trying to figure out trigonometry in maths lessons and wondering how finding x will ever help you in life (spoiler; it probably won’t).

    But how exactly are you drawing your x? Because apparently, not everyone is doing it the same way.

    While the answer might be painfully obvious to you (number seven, duh), there seems to be a difference in how people around the world write their X.

    A picture of different ways to write the letter has been doing the rounds on Twitter with everyone weighing in with their preferences.

    One Twitter user noticed there was a difference between how Brits and Americans do it; ‘General consensus is that Americans do seven and eight while the UK does five and six. Probably how we were taught. Not sure about other countries.’

    Another user suggested it may be due to which hand you use to write: ‘Depending on if you’re right or left handed, it should be seven or eight. What kind of sick person draws an x any other way?’

    Meanwhile, others went for a more dramatic approach saying anyone who draws it in any way other than seven probably showers with their socks on (true, probably).

    You might be surprised at all this chat over one little x but the way you write it could actually say something about your personality.

    According to stationery sellers, The Penn Warehouse, more than 5,000 personality traits can be shown through your handwriting.

    We don’t have time for all of those so here are a few things the way you draw an x or any other letter might be telling of your characteristics.

    For example, are your letters quite slanted? According to Reader’s Digest, if you slant slightly to the right when you write, you like to meet and work with new people whereas a left slant means you prefer to keep to yourself. Left slanters also tend to be reserved and introspective.

    If your letters are all joined up it could mean you’re very logical and make decisions based on hard facts and experiences. Those who disconnect their letters may be more imaginative, impulsive, and base decisions on intuition.

    And unsurprisingly, if you rush your writing you may be impulsive and impatient, whereas if you take your time, you are self-reliant and methodical.

    So, next question to spiral you into an existential crisis; how do you draw an e?

    MORE: If you have high moral standards, you’re ‘less likely’ to be funny

    MORE: Someone’s created a vegan Cornish pasty and non-vegans aren’t happy

    MORE: Woman claims she was left with a bald patch after new curler ripped her hair out


    How do you draw an X?How do you draw an X?faimabakar1How do you draw an X?How do you draw an X?faimabakar1

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    (Picture: Getty)

    We’re slowly getting the hang of periods.

    There are finally adverts showing blood instead of a strange blue liquid. There are campaigns against period poverty. Various Scottish public buildings now have free sanitary products.

    That said, there’s still plenty for us to be working through when it comes to removing shame and embarrassment around something that’s simply a natural bodily function.

    We wrote a while ago about the fact some people assume that if you use heavy flow tampons you have some sort of cavernous vagina (which is just big pussy energy, folks, and nothing to be ashamed of – even though your tampon absorbency has no bearing on this).

    This is certainly a thing, but with the rise of environmental consciousness and a reduction of stigma around periods also comes a separate problem; pad shaming.

    From the eco standpoint, sanitary towels have gone way out of fashion. They’re typically lined with plastic, and even make up part of the infamous fatberg.

    There are also a strange enduring idea about pads that they’re a ‘starter’ option – something you use before you graduate to more grown-up methods.

    Much better then, surely, to go for a tampon or cup, doing less harm to the world and meaning you can wear thongs and go about your daily life without worrying about leakage?

    In an ideal world, sure. But for most people who use pads, there are legitimate reasons,

    Mental health and human rights campaigner Nikki, 21, says that worries about toxic shock syndrome prompted her to stick with pads once she’d started her period. She also says they’re simply more comfortable, but she still has to field nasty comments from friends.

    She told Metro.co.uk: ‘When I’ve bought pads before if I’ve been with a friend they say, ‘what are you, 12?’ and it’s just rude. People who have periods should be able to use whatever they want for whatever reasons.’

    (Picture: Getty)

    23-year-old marketing assistant Chloe, 23 has similar reasons for using sanitary pads. She says:

    ‘I prefer them for comfort and for ease of changing them when i’m out and about, I’ve been very uncomfortable with tampons in the past (like not being able to sit down properly!)’. She says, she ‘may just been I’ve not got the knack of applying tampons properly but who has time to faff around getting the knack in this busy day and age?!’

    Apart from the pamphlet that comes with the box, many don’t have the adequate help to get started using tampons when they’re younger, and then become too embarrassed to ask as the years go by. When you then move on to cups and the different folding and insertion techniques you’re adding a whole extra level of tribulation to your menstruation.

    Jessica, a 21-year-old digital PR executive tells us:

    ‘Something about the idea of tampons just doesn’t sit right with me. I know they’re completely safe but I always get so worried about them going too far or getting stuck up there (even though I know that sounds stupid). I also get worried about TSS (toxic shock syndrome) even though I know the chances of contracting that are SO slim. I guess it’s just a psychological thing, I prefer pads because I like to know they’re staying OUT of my body!

    I certainly wasn’t educated on TSS at school. Toxic shock warnings are all over tampon packs which can breed a sense of urgency, but a simple lesson on how long to leave them in and which absorbency to use could assuage fears.

    What is TSS?

    ‘Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a rare but life-threatening condition caused by bacteria getting into the body and releasing harmful toxins.

    It’s often associated with tampon use in young women, but it can affect anyone of any age – including men and children.’

    There are plenty of ways you can reduce your risk (even though it’s already small). Find out more here.

    However, it’s still someone’s choice if, despite knowing all this, they’d prefer to avoid the risk altogether.

    The misinformation still comes from all directions, with Jessica saying that people ask her things like ‘ew, isn’t that unhygienic though?’ and ‘how can you sit there with one on!?’

    Chloe also says that if she can’t go swimming, for example, people say to her ‘well, use a tampon instead’ as if it’s some standard option that she hasn’t remotely considered (discounting that they’re genuinely uncomfortable for her).

    Retail manager Niamh, 27, has never liked using tampons. Although her friends call pads ‘bulky’, she says, ‘I prefer that over feeling physically ‘off’’.

    Pad shaming is something she’s experienced since school, saying, ‘If I didn’t go swimming or such like I’d get peers asking why I didn’t just use a tampon.’

    ‘If I tried to explain some would say it was cause I was overthinking it or being ridiculous, when really it’s just my preference. I find tampons physically uncomfortable and when I’ve tried to use them I found it painful.’

    Although all the women I spoke to said that they’re now able to deal with the snide comments maturely and are happy with their decisions, it’s not something that should be considered a joke.

    When we already have enough criticism of our bodies and reproductive health choices, the last thing we need is to be berating each other over whether we plug up our menses or not.

    MORE: We need to talk about the psychological effects of suffering a sports injury

    MORE: How do you catch super-gonorrhoea and can it be cured?


    It's not cool to pad shame women who don't use tampons or cupsIt's not cool to pad shame women who don't use tampons or cupsjessicacvlIt's not cool to pad shame women who don't use tampons or cupsIt's not cool to pad shame women who don't use tampons or cupsjessicacvl

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    (Picture: Getty Images)

    Fancy a day of pampering this Valentine’s?

    If you’re in need of a little rest, recovery, relaxation and a major beauty indulgence, nothing beats spending time together in a romantic space on a couples spa break.

    Whether it is a Spa break into the city or into the countryside, we’ve found stunning hotels, pampering spa treatments with relaxing atmospheres and rejuvenating massages, facials and other day spa treatments that tick all the boxes.

    1. Pennyhill Park Hotel & The Spa

    Pennyhill Park Hotel & The Spa
    (Picture: booking.com)

    You’ve seen the pics all over Instagram of this five-star staycation.

    Pennyhill Park is set in 123 acres of Surrey countryside and is a pretty spot to soak away your stress (in the outdoor hot tub).

    This award-winning spa offers both spa days and weekend packages to leave you rejuvenated and indulged.

    Opt for a massage, manicure, or full body treatment – we recommend the ‘rasul experience for two’ for the ultimate self-care treat.

    Make sure you also try out the Themis restaurant, tepidarium, dry heat sauna and foot spas.

    Where: London Rd, Bagshot GU19 5EU

    For more information visit booking.com

     

    2. Luton Hoo Hotel, Golf and Spa

    Luton Hoo Hotel, Golf and Spa
    (Picture: booking.com)

    This welcoming retreat is secluded in the Bedfordshire countryside and will leave you so relaxed you won’t want to head home.

    Their wide range of treatments include personalised facials, body wraps and Swedish massages, each using high-end products from ESPA and OPI.

    Afterwards, head to a dimly lit relaxation room, complete with a fish tank, leather recliners and soft throws and enjoy a post-treatment cup of herbal tea.

    Facilities also include an infinity pool, vitality pool and a heat therapy suite. As well as tennis courts, mapped walks, jogging trails.

    And for an afternoon feed, nothing beats a cream tea in Adam’s Brasserie.

    Where: The Mansion House, The Warren Dr, Luton LU1 3TQ

    For more information visit booking.comtreatwell.co.uk

     

    3. Thermae Bath Spa

    Thermae Bath Spa
    (Picture: Thermae Bath Spa)

    Nestled in the heart of Bath city center is the UK’s only natural thermal spa and it’s well worth a visit.

    Sure, Bath’s busiest hotspot hardly seems like the ideal location for relaxation, but trust us, once you’ve slipped on your fluffy robe you won’t look back.

    With several floors to explore featuring a Roman steam room, Georgian steam room, infrared room, ice chamber (brrr), celestial relaxation room and experience showers, there’s something for all spa-goers.

    But undoubtedly the star of show is the open-air rooftop pool with a spectacular view over Bath.

    Treatments in the historic spa include; hot stones, facials, mum-to-be massages and the spa’s signature treatment, Watsu.

    Where: The Hetling Pump Room, Hot Bath St, Bath BA1 1SJ

    2 Hours Spa Session Any Day (over 16 years): £40 per ticket. For more information visit thermaebathspa.comtripadvisor.co.uk

     

    4. The Romilly Wilde Metabolic Facial

    The Romilly Wilde Metabolic Facial
    (Picture: Getty Images)

    If it’s your skin (and mind) that could do with a little TLC and you’d like to coincide a spot of shopping, the The Romilly Wilde Metabolic Facial located on the 6th floor of Harrods is well worth spending your hard-earned money on.

    The non-invasive treatment is utterly calming and you’ll feel totally zen within ten, thanks to the tuning forks and gong bath and of course, the trusted, capable hands of your therapist.

    Immediately after your skin looks clear and glowing as well as feeling supple and smooth.

    Oh and be prepared to take your socks off as this facial includes a foot massage.

    Where: 87 Brompton Rd, Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7XL

    For more information visit romillywilde.comharrods.com

     

    5. Champneys Tring Resort

    Champneys Tring Resort
    (Picture: Champneys)

    Synonymous with health, beauty and wellbeing, Champneys Tring Resort has it all.

    Set in the rolling countryside of Hertfordshire, Champneys offers a selection of fitness classes, fully equipped gym and all of the accompanying spa facilities – think swimming pool, sauna, Jacuzzi and steam room.

    And beauty lovers will be pleased to hear there’s over 100 treatments to choose from including personalised facials, deep tissue massages and luxury pedicures using products from cult brands Aromatherapy Associates, Clarins and Elemis.

    Where: Chesham Rd, Tring HP23 6HX

    For more information visit booking.comvirginexperiencedays.co.ukchampneys.com

     

    6. The SPA of Bvlgari Hotel London

    Bvlgari Hotel London
    (Picture: Bvlgari Hotel London)

    Located in Knightsbridge on the edge of Hyde Park, the SPA of Bvlgari Hotel London is one of the largest and most exclusive spas in central London.

    We recommend taking advantage of the 25-metre swimming pool and their utterly luxurious a-list approved facial treatments, including LED-light therapy, iS Clinical Fire & Ice and Swiss cellular facials.

    The spa consists of 11 private treatment rooms, steam room, jacuzzi and fitness area. And the hotel is also home to a 47 seat cinema, a unique Cigar Shop and has its very own Pastry Chef if you fancy a sweet treat.

    Where: 171 Knightsbridge, London SW7 1DW

    For more information visit booking.comspabreaks.com

     

    7. Lanesborough Club & Spa

    Lanesborough Club & Spa
    (Picture: Lanesborough Club & Spa)

    The Lanesborough Club & Spa was crowned England’s Best Hotel Spa 2018 at the World Spa Awards and it’s not surprising.

    Below the beautifully decorated bedrooms, lies a hydro pool, treatment rooms and spa that offers an impressive range of treatments.

    Among your traditional facials and massages you can book a deluxe caviar body treatment and exclusive Method of Excellence designed by ‘super therapist’ Anastasia Achilleos.

    You’ll leave feeling fabulous. Guaranteed.

    Where: 2 Lanesborough Place, Belgravia, London SW1X 7TA

    For more information visit lanesboroughclubandspa.comtripadvisor.co.uk, booking.com

     


    Pamper your gorgeous selfPamper your gorgeous selfemilyknott17Pennyhill Park Hotel & The SpaLuton Hoo Hotel, Golf and SpaThermae Bath SpaThe Romilly Wilde Metabolic FacialChampneys Tring ResortBvlgari Hotel LondonLanesborough Club & SpaPamper your gorgeous selfPamper your gorgeous selfemilyknott17Pennyhill Park Hotel & The SpaLuton Hoo Hotel, Golf and SpaThermae Bath SpaThe Romilly Wilde Metabolic FacialChampneys Tring ResortBvlgari Hotel LondonLanesborough Club & Spa

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    (Picture: Getty Images/ Digital Vision)

    When you’re young, the world seems a lot more black and white. One little girl who was so used to seeing male firefighters thought only men could do the job.

    Journalist Hannah Summers told Twitter recently about her four-year-old daughter, Esme, who wished she was a boy so she could work at a fire service station.

    Not realising that women could do the job too, the youngster said to her mum: ‘I’ve seen in books they are all boys and I don’t want to be the only girl.’

    So a bunch of female firefighters got in touch with Esme to show that women can do any role and be a boss at it.

    Firefighters at car accident."n
    (Picture: Getty Images/ E+)

    Mum Hannah initially asked the people of Twitter for book recommendations that feature young girls in different roles.

    But instead she was met with real-life firefighters who put their lives on the line every day,

    At first it was the West Midlands Fire Services who got in touch, saying: ‘Lots of our firefighters are girls and boys – some of them want to say hello to you Esme! We would love to meet you and show you what we do. You can be a firefighter too.’

    Then the New York City Fire Department got involved not only with illustrated books of girl firefighters but also pictures of real-life adult ones.

    The story also reached Canada, where fire chief Darrel Reid spoke of a female colleague who does the same job as him.

    He wrote: ‘Good morning! I heard your four-year-old daughter was discouraged because she felt she had to be a boy to be a firefighter.

    ‘In Vancouver, we have awesome firefighters who happen to be women!

    ‘And Nanaimo’s (British Columbia) Karen Fry is a great chief who happens to be a woman!’

    The sweet responses from people all over the world, including the London Fire Brigade, touched Hannah, who shared the images and videos with Esme.

    In turn, Esme decided she too could be a firefighter, drawing herself as one to say thanks to everyone.

    How cute.

    MORE: When I was born, the doctor apologised. No parent of a disabled baby should hear that

    MORE: Man asks if he’s wrong for ordering sushi in front of pregnant wife who asked him not to

    MORE: Woman takes up naked hiking as part of her ‘Yes Year’ after a breakup


    Kindergarten student wearing fire fighter costumeKindergarten student wearing fire fighter costumefaimabakar1Firefighters at car accident.Kindergarten student wearing fire fighter costumeKindergarten student wearing fire fighter costumefaimabakar1Firefighters at car accident."n

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    An Illinois tattoo artist is offering hyper-realistic tattoos for free to people who have suffered illnesses and body traumas. Eric Catalano, the owner of Eternal Ink tattoo studio in Hecker, Illinois has helped countless breast cancer victims who have undergone a mastectomy by offering realistic 3D nipples. And most recently the 38-year-old ink artist and father-of-three has tattooed nails onto a man who had two fingers partially amputated when he got them caught in a fan belt of an air conditioning units back in March 2018. This gentleman came to me last week asking for fingernails to be tattooed on his two nubs and I accepted, Eric explained to LAD Bible. Eric started doing hyper-realistic tattoos back in 2010 to raise awareness for breast cancer, and quickly developed a technique to create 3D nipples. "The awareness raising 'trend' was just not enough, he said.?? So,??I got to work on parenting and inventing a micro dermal??Implant that sits under the skin and has a silicone areola and nipple magnetized to the top??as a way to??give women a tangible nipple instead of just raising awareness. Eric is now flooded with requests, and started a crowd funding drive on January 16 in a bid to continue to offer his free services. So far he has raised more than $4,000 of his $50,000 goal. He said: What this will allow is angel donations to pay me, for sufferers to receive their free tattoo work. Allowing me to help more and more people while still being able to support myself. I've been offering free tattoo services to survivors of amputation and cancer to make them feel whole again [and] I feel terrible charging the people who have already suffered pain and injury or battling life and death. They've already been through so much. And I just flat out refuse to make them pay to receive my services& I cannot do it. . 20 Jan 2019 Pictured: Eric Catalano, the owner of Eternal Ink tattoo studio in Hecker, Illinois is offering hyper-realistic tattoos for free to people who have suffered body traumas, including recreating fingernails on a man whose fingers became partially amputated in an accident and women who have undergone a mastectomy. Photo credit: Eric Catalano/ MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342
    Eric gives free tattoos to survivors of cancer and amputees (Picture: Eric Catalano/ MEGA)
    It’s amazing what you can do with tattoos.

    While we’ve previously praised tattoos that cover scars and give nipples to people who have had mastectomies, we’re still blown away by this particular bit of ink.

    Eric Catalano, the owner of Eternal Ink in Hecker, Illinois, tattooed nails on the fingers of a man who had to have partial amputation after getting his fingers caught in a fan belt of an air conditioning unit.

    The man approached Eric to ask if he could have realistic-looking nail tattoos on his amputated fingers. Eric obliged, and the results are pretty incredible.

    A man came in asking for fingernails to be tattooed on his amputated fingers (Picture: Eric Catalano/ MEGA)

    Nails aren’t the only super realistic body part Eric has managed to tattoo.

    For years now he’s been giving survivors of breast cancer 3D nipple tattoos, which he does for free.

    ‘My grandmother, Mary Catalano, was a breast cancer survivor, as well as many women who were close to my family,’ Eric told The Sun.

    ‘So I started offering free breast cancer tattoos to raise awareness. Through that outlet, many of the women needed nipple tattoos after their mastectomies.

    ‘I couldn’t bring myself to charge them, and I’ve been doing them for free for five or six years now.

    ‘They’ve already been through so much. I just flat out refuse to make them pay to receive my services – I cannot do it.’

    Eric launched a crowdfunder so he can continue giving the tattoos for free, and has so far raised $4,000 of his $50,000 goal.

    He hopes to create a prosthetic implant to give cancer survivors nipples that are even more realistic.

    MORE: The best Valentine’s Day spa breaks and treatments in the UK

    MORE: It’s not cool to pad shame women who don’t use tampons or cups


    Incredible tattoos give man who had finger tips amputated in accident hyper-realistic nailsIncredible tattoos give man who had finger tips amputated in accident hyper-realistic nailsellencscottAn Illinois tattoo artist is offering hyper-realistic tattoos for free to people who have suffered illnesses and body traumas. Eric Catalano, the owner of Eternal Ink tattoo studio in Hecker, Illinois has helped countless breast cancer victims who have undergone a mastectomy by offering realistic 3D nipples. And most recently the 38-year-old ink artist and father-of-three has tattooed nails onto a man who had two fingers partially amputated when he got them caught in a fan belt of an air conditioning units back in March 2018. This gentleman came to me last week asking for fingernails to be tattooed on his two nubs and I accepted, Eric explained to LAD Bible. Eric started doing hyper-realistic tattoos back in 2010 to raise awareness for breast cancer, and quickly developed a technique to create 3D nipples. Incredible tattoos give man who had finger tips amputated in accident hyper-realistic nailsIncredible tattoos give man who had finger tips amputated in accident hyper-realistic nailsellencscottAn Illinois tattoo artist is offering hyper-realistic tattoos for free to people who have suffered illnesses and body traumas. Eric Catalano, the owner of Eternal Ink tattoo studio in Hecker, Illinois has helped countless breast cancer victims who have undergone a mastectomy by offering realistic 3D nipples. And most recently the 38-year-old ink artist and father-of-three has tattooed nails onto a man who had two fingers partially amputated when he got them caught in a fan belt of an air conditioning units back in March 2018. This gentleman came to me last week asking for fingernails to be tattooed on his two nubs and I accepted, Eric explained to LAD Bible. Eric started doing hyper-realistic tattoos back in 2010 to raise awareness for breast cancer, and quickly developed a technique to create 3D nipples. "The awareness raising 'trend' was just not enough, he said.?? So,??I got to work on parenting and inventing a micro dermal??Implant that sits under the skin and has a silicone areola and nipple magnetized to the top??as a way to??give women a tangible nipple instead of just raising awareness. Eric is now flooded with requests, and started a crowd funding drive on January 16 in a bid to continue to offer his free services. So far he has raised more than $4,000 of his $50,000 goal. He said: What this will allow is angel donations to pay me, for sufferers to receive their free tattoo work. Allowing me to help more and more people while still being able to support myself. I've been offering free tattoo services to survivors of amputation and cancer to make them feel whole again [and] I feel terrible charging the people who have already suffered pain and injury or battling life and death. They've already been through so much. And I just flat out refuse to make them pay to receive my services& I cannot do it. . 20 Jan 2019 Pictured: Eric Catalano, the owner of Eternal Ink tattoo studio in Hecker, Illinois is offering hyper-realistic tattoos for free to people who have suffered body traumas, including recreating fingernails on a man whose fingers became partially amputated in an accident and women who have undergone a mastectomy. Photo credit: Eric Catalano/ MEGA TheMegaAgency.com +1 888 505 6342

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    Rio is launching the scheme in his hometown, Peckham (Picture: DNAFit)

    Prevention is better than cure.

    We know the phrase, but what does it mean for your health – and how can you apply it to your own lifestyle?

    Rio Ferdinand believes prevention is everything. And when it comes to your health, information is king.

    The more you know, the more you can prepare and make pro-active changes for a healthier existence.

    The former professional footballer has teamed up with wellness genetics company DNAFit to launch a new initiative focused on DNA-based preventative fitness and nutrition.

    The aim is to provide bespoke training plans based on the principal that there isn’t one set model for good health.

    (Picture: DNAFit)

    What works for one person won’t necessarily work for everyone. Our bodies are infinitely complex and individual and, as such, we need to train differently and eat differently to get the best results.

    This can be particularly difficult in January when we are bombarded with health messages.

    It can be easy to think that doing Dry January, going vegan, cutting out carbs  – or following whatever the latest diet trend is, will definitely help you be healthier.

    But just because a diet is big in the press or on social media, doesn’t mean it will necessarily give you the results you want.

    ‘I think a lot of people in our culture will follow a fad, or the trend of the moment,’ Rio tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘We want to give people information. This DNAFit kit will give them more information then they’ve ever had – so they can make more informed decisions based on preventative health, but also make changes to their nutrition and fitness.

    ‘I’m an ambassador for the brand because I believe in it.

    ‘I’m living proof that you can make changes to not only your body, but also your lifestyle, and can help the future of not only yourself, but also your family.’

    The process is simple. You apply for a DNA kit online. When it arrives you simply swab the inside of your mouth and send it off to the lab. Within ten days you’ll receive your results and a bespoke plan of action.

    You’ll get diet insights, training plans, meal plans and even a personal health coach to help you hit your goals.

    It normally costs £179, but until the end of January you can sign up to the service for £100. It’s not cheap. But Rio is adamant that you can’t put a price on preventative health.

    ‘If you don’t know your body inside out, it’s hard for you to really make a positive change, for the right reasons,’ explains Rio.

    ‘This is an important project for me because of what’s gone on in my life, in recent years especially. Good health is everything.

    ‘If you’re worried about stuff, about diseases that could be hereditary, and you’re worried for your children as well, you want to make sure you give yourself the best possible chance to make the right choices to create the healthiest possible lifestyle.’

    How does DNAFit work?

    Apply for a DNA kit on the website.

    Use the saliva swab to get a sample of DNA from you mouth.

    Send your swab to the accredited laboratories in the post.

    Your results are ready within 10 business days.

    DNAFit

    (Picture: DNAFit)

    The launch comes at a time when the UK is in the midst of a health crisis.

    Childhood obesity is spiraling, lifestyle-triggered diseases are growing and, for the first time in a century, life expectancy has actually dropped.

    We’re supposed to be living longer and living better – but that’s not happening. Rio thinks it comes down to culture and mindset.

    ‘What we need to change, if we’re going to seriously address the health crisis, is the mindset around health in this country,’ Rio tells us.

    ‘People don’t want to go to the doctors. They don’t want to find out what’s potentially coming down the line for them. They would rather wait.

    ‘People only want to go to the doctors when they’re already ill – and in lots of cases that’s too late, and there are so many things that can be prevented simply by finding out the information earlier.

    ‘We want to break this cycle of reactive health care – and really embed this sense of proactive engagement into the collective psyche.’

    The idea is to create a holistic approach to wellness. You can’t just focus on diet, or just focus on exercise – the two have to work together.

    In the same way, you have to think about your mental and emotional well-being alongside the physical.

    ‘Looking into your DNA feeds in to your mental health as well,’ says Rio.

    ‘Some people have hereditary diseases, in their bloodline, and that can cause a huge amount of anxiety and worry – particularly if you actually lose someone close to you.

    ‘The uncertainty can drive people to think, “could I be next in line?” So mental health is a really big issue.

    ‘If you can find out all of the relevant information, have it all under one umbrella, it can take away a lot of that uncertainty and worry – and help you make proactive, positive decisions to counter the issues that could come up for you in the future.’

    As a former athlete, Rio is keen to stress the importance of sport and physical activity as an integral part of good health.

    If you train a lot, understanding the inner workings of your body can be the greatest tool at your disposal.

    ‘It tells you how you should train to best effect your body. I could be doing loads of endurance training, but my body won’t respond to it in the best way because it’s the wrong type of training for me specifically,’ explains Rio.

    ‘It’s bespoke to your body’s needs. Fitness can’t be a one-size-fits-all kind of thing – you have to know how your body responds to food and exercise in order to use it to your advantage.

    ‘Information is king. If you’re an elite athlete, or if you’re just Joe Bloggs down the road – it’s going to be beneficial for you.

    ‘I wish I had had something like this available to me when I was playing. When I played I was heavy on the carbs – very little protein. Which was completely wrong for me – I should have been eating a much more balanced diet.

    ‘I wasn’t as informed as I could’ve been. That was partly down to my own stubbornness, but ultimately I just didn’t have the tools I needed.’

    (Picture: DNAFit)

    Simply Googling the term ‘healthy eating’ or ‘fitness’ will likely leave you feeling overwhelmed.

    The sheer number of resources and plans and schemes all promising to help you be the best you you can be. But it’s a mistake to take these diets and training plans at face-value. It’s always worth looking a little deeper at your own personal needs.

    ‘We’re constantly being bombarded with new health fads – particularly in January,’ says Rio.

    ‘I would always question those messages and look at those new trends skeptically. I would think, “well it might work for you, why does that mean it’s going to work for me?”

    ‘Now, I can look at my own DNA, at my own results, and look more critically at the latest health trends – and know which elements will work specifically for me.

    ‘It’s a good feeling to be training with the knowledge that you’re on the right pathway.

    ‘Before, I would be following plans, doing these leg weights, eating a certain kind of food – and I would think – it’s not even going to f***ing work. I’m busting my balls and I’m not even guaranteed to get the results I want.’

    Rio’s dedication to a health and wellness goes beyond his personal goals. He wants to create a legacy for his children and future generations.

    ‘I try and make sure that my children see how to live healthily. It’s one thing telling them, but you’ve got to show them,’ Rio explains.

    ‘So my kids know I’m going to the gym, they know my misses goes to the gym, we take them out walking, or they’re out on their bikes.

    ‘They moan when they’ve got to get up at six in the morning to go to running club. But I want them to have healthy, active lifestyles and I want that to continue to be the case throughout their lives – and for that to happen, I do have to lead by example.’

    MORE: How to keep exercising even when the cold snap hits

    MORE: We need to talk about the psychological effects of suffering a sports injury

    MORE: How to do flutter kicks: the perfect technique for the tough core exercise


    dna_fit_stills_02-b2dadna_fit_stills_02-b2danataliemorris88dna_fit_stills_02-b2dadna_fit_stills_02-b2danataliemorris88

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    How we see (left) versus how colour blind people see (right) (Picture: colourblindawareness/Lenstore)

    Have you ever wondered how colour blind people see the world?

    Colour blindness – or colour vision deficiency – affects more men than women, affecting one in 12 men (8%) and one in 200 women in the world.

    In Britain, this means that there are approximately three million colour blind people (about 4.5% of the entire population).

    Eyecare provider Lenstore has teamed up with charity Colour Blindness Awareness UK to reveal how people with three different types of the condition see the world.

    The differences are fascinating. Slide across the pictures to see what we see versus what colour blind people see.

    Tritanopia

    This is the inability to process blue light. This rare form confuses light blues with greys, dark purples with black, mid-greens with blues and oranges with reds.

     

    Protanopia

    This is the inability to see red light. People with this may confuse red with green, and green with blue.

     

    Deuteranopia

    This is the inability to process green light.

    What is life like for the colour blind?

    Kathryn Albany-Ward, CEO of Colour  Blindness UK explained the condition to Metro.co.uk. 

    What difficulties do people with colour blindness face on a daily basis?

    They may struggle with: Driving, using maps – the London Underground map is impossible to follow – but also understanding any information only provided with colour, such as textbooks and educational resources.

    What measures are in place to help people living with colour blindness?

    Despite videos of glasses circulating on social media, which claim to solve colour blindness, there is no cure. There is also nothing in place in schools or workplaces on the whole, and society often ignores people with colour blindness, whether they are in the workplace or at leisure.

    What can someone do to help a person with colour blindness?

    Never provide information by colour alone. To be inclusive, schools and businesses should ensure any information given in colour is also given in another way such as text labels, symbols and patterns.

    Schools and businesses need to realise that school exam results could be improved by providing proper support to students from reception to A Levels, and businesses could gain up to 5% more customers by providing proper labels e.g. clothes retailers and online retailers could attract colour blind customers by providing colour information on labels or as a hover function on websites.

    MORE: What it’s like to see through someone else’s eyes

    MORE: Little girl thinks you have to be a boy to be a firefighter – so female firefighters get in touch

    MORE: We need to talk about the psychological effects of suffering a sports injury


    How do colourblind people see the world?How do colourblind people see the world?faimabakar1How do colourblind people see the world?How do colourblind people see the world?faimabakar1

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    why do muslim women find it so hard to find a partner-dc7d
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Muslim girls are ambitious, quirky, fun, driven, smart, brilliant, kind, virtuous – you know, just like other women.

    Dating is a minefield for any poor soul but when you add religion to the mix the pool becomes a lot smaller.

    For Muslims, religion means no sex before marriage. It can also mean overprotective parents who police their children’s relationships with the opposite sex.

    But when Muslim men and women become adults and are of a marriageable age (usually 21+), it can be especially difficult for the women to find a suitable partner.

    I’ve had many conversations with women struggling to find a partner. Instead of shouting into the same echo chambers unreachable to Muslim men, we want Muslim men to understand our frustrations.

    So, a few different Muslim women explained to Metro.co.uk what barriers stand in their way.

    Because I’m also a Muslim woman ‘of marriageable age’, I’ll go first and alienate all men, just for your entertainment.

    Illo request: Feminism needs to cater to Muslim women, not the other way around
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Faima, 25, UK

    Muslim women find themselves at a bit of a disadvantage because, to be blunt, they’re better-rounded individuals than men.

    Female Muslims have been able to form well-rounded personalities which comes from being matured at a young age.

    Young Muslim girls learn responsibility, independence, self-awareness in their childhood, whereas Muslim boys are largely sheltered and have things done for them. Muslim men’s real strain is financial responsibilities when they grow up – they’re expected to be alpha males; protectors and breadwinners (a whole other conversation).

    More often than not, they’re expected to perform well at school and then get lucrative jobs. And as those of us who work in creative industries know, there’s little money in that.

    So usually male Muslims end up in the standard money-making roles, banking, finance, or other respected roles such as medicine or law.

    While all those jobs are good, they – as well as any alpha male tendencies – can prevent these men from tapping into their other creative talents, and stop them from being exposed to other communities, perspectives, and from being open-minded.

    Enter Muslim women who’ve navigated cultural identities, responsibilities, faith, all the while juggling some of the same troubles as men.

    In short, we’ve become personable individuals who are more daring, inquisitive, fierce, and independent – things which are threatening to some men.

    This is an oversimplified glimpse of the wider problem. It isn’t an attempt to alienate Muslim men but rather to demonstrate some of Muslim women’s frustrations.

    How Dry January can improve your sex life
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Sidrah, 33, U.S

    Men are out of touch, they grow up entitled and believe that the entire household revolves around them and their needs. Women in our society are socialised to put the needs of others above their own, often to their detriment, and when men see this on the regular, they take this behaviour to be the norm.

    Many men have told me that they love being around me as a friend and that I’m fun to hang out with because I’m open, daring and independent- but I’m not marriage material because I don’t cater to their every whim. So be it, I choose to live a life that I love.

    Also I’ve experienced these situations not just with Muslim men, but men in general in both the east and the West. The West likes to pretend that they are far more advanced than third world countries but the reality is far darker than they would care to admit.

    (Picture: MMuffin for Metro.co.uk)

    Aaliyah, 27, Canada

    I think it’s difficult for Muslim women to find a spouse because we are subtly or covertly socialised not to approach men because there are connotations that doing so makes us desperate or easy. This socialisation comes from both Western cultures and our own cultures.

    I also think it is difficult to find a spouse because there is a level of entitlement among men whereby they expect us to be really good looking and really educated but also very submissive to the needs of their egos.

    Men don’t have very respectful or evolved ideas about women, so usually, the interactions I’ve had have been very patronising and shallow, or I have been a random man on the internet’s therapist but there was no space in the interaction for him to be my therapist.

    I don’t think it’s difficult for Muslim men to find wives because I think population-wise there are more women than men and unfortunately, many women have internalised the idea that they absolutely have to cater to a man’s physical, intellectual, spiritual and sexual needs at their own expense.

    In some cultures, women are also socialised to desire marriage beyond anything else from a very young age so when they are proposed to, it feels like an accomplishment.

    Sarah, 26, U.S

    Some Muslim men have an inferiority complex when it comes to marriage and settling down because they know Muslim women will set them in their place.

    Also, some Muslim men only see other Muslim women as their end; marriage. They know their mums would never let them marry a non-Muslim so they go around and have their fun then come back to us and expect us to ‘heal’ them

    I think the important thing for male Muslims to know is that we are not their last options or their safe zones.

    Saeeda, 22, U.S

    I made a Tinder for the first time just to see what all the hype was about, as far away from New York as possible so there wasn’t a possibility of someone from the Sudanese community seeing it and snitching to my parents. I wasn’t really sure what to expect.

    Then I came across Minder (the Muslim Tinder app) and thought I’d give that a try as well. I don’t think I downloaded the app with the intention of finding a husband, I just wanted to see what was out there.

    It was gross in its own way. I saw things like ‘Arab/Middle Eastern only’ and ‘who’s about that housewife life?’ in people’s bios, white converts practically fetishising Muslim women.

    Minder’s vibe is pretty wholesome and halal. I guess my options as a Muslim woman is to either use non-Muslim dating apps full of men who reduce women to one-night stands or use Muslim dating apps full of men who reduce women to housewives/Mum 2.0 .

    I think heterosexual men are out of touch because they view themselves as necessities in women’s lives. Our patriarchal society exaggerated men’s importance their whole lives and conditioned them to believe that women need them. I have to laugh.

    I’m not trying to sound like a stereotypical radical feminist but I really could live a completely fulfilling life without ever interacting with a man, let alone marry one! They don’t understand this, and that’s where they go wrong.

    It’s 2019. Women aren’t settling for less than they deserve.

    Preach.

    MORE: Feminism needs to cater to Muslim women, not the other way around

    MORE: Prowling is the hot-and-cold dating trend coming to you in 2019

    MORE: Women reveal horror stories of nightmare mother-in-laws


    why do muslim women find it so hard to find a partner-dc7dwhy do muslim women find it so hard to find a partner-dc7dfaimabakar1why do muslim women find it so hard to find a partner-dc7dIllo request: Feminism needs to cater to Muslim women, not the other way aroundHow Dry January can improve your sex lifewhy do muslim women find it so hard to find a partner-dc7dwhy do muslim women find it so hard to find a partner-dc7dfaimabakar1why do muslim women find it so hard to find a partner-dc7dIllo request: Feminism needs to cater to Muslim women, not the other way aroundHow Dry January can improve your sex life

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    Woman's hand on is pouring tablets in her hand.
    Are collagen supplements worth the money? (Picture: Getty)

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body – it’s in your skin, bones, muscles, cartilage, ligaments and blood.

    It’s a structural protein that essentially glues everything together.

    The body produces collagen naturally, but production slows with age – gradually decreasing from our mid-20s – which is why skin starts to lose elasticity and lose its ability to retain moisture.

    Joint pain can also occur, as well as digestive issues (collagen helps build a protective wall along the gut, letting it do its thing in peace). Other factors like stress, smoking, poor diet, and sun exposure can also deplete collagen stores.

    There are plenty of collagen supplements on the market – mostly aimed at the beauty-conscious audience – all claiming to help keep us looking and feeling younger.

    However, all direct sources of collagen are animal-based, coming from cows, chickens, fish or egg. What are us vegans supposed to do?

    There a small number of vegan ‘collagen boosting’ supplements on the market, like Vegavero Vegan Collagen Plus Complex, which claim to help increase your body’s production of the stuff.

    These supplements often contain antioxidants, and vitamins and minerals like vitamin C (the most important nutrient when it comes to collagen production), vitamin E, zinc, copper and manganese, which the makers say increases how much collagen your body makes.

    ‘We designed our supplement using L-Lysine and L-Proline along with carefully selected plant extracts that contain key ingredients such as natural vitamin C,’ the Vegavero website states.

    ‘Vitamin C can contribute to the normal formation of collagen in our bodies.’

    Fantastic news for collagen conscious vegans, right? Well, maybe, maybe not. (Omnivores, you’d better listen up too.)

    High Angle View Of Oranges Over Colored Background
    Vitamin C is an essential nutrient in our body’s production of collagen, but is it better to obtain it from food rather than supplements? (Picture: Getty)

    ‘Taking [animal-based] collagen supplements or multivitamins for skin are likely to be of little benefit and there is little robust, reliable and reproducible clinical data which show their benefit in boosting collagen,’ explains dermatologist Dr Anjali Mahto, author of The Skincare Bible.

    ‘One of the major issues is lack of independent research and most of the positive data we have conveniently comes from the companies making these products, so there is a clear conflict of interest.’

    This was evident when I put out a request for experts in the field, and was swamped with unqualified individuals wishing to peddle their ‘collagen boosting’ skincare supplements, while side-stepping my questions regarding nutrition and science.

    (There are a lot of unqualified ‘nutritionists’ offering questionable advice online – it’s always a good idea to  check their credentials before taking their word as gospel. Fancy Instagram pictures do not equate to cold, hard facts.)

    Okay, so collagen supplements have the potential to be a load of bull, but what about the vegan vitamin versions?

    ‘There is even less evidence that taking a concoction of antioxidants and multivitamins will boost collagen in the body,’ Dr Mahto advises.

    ‘There are multiple different types of collagen (type 1 and 3 for example are the main skin types) and whilst individual nutrients like vitamin C for example are integral to collagen structure, taking excess in the form of a supplement will not boost its production – your body will excrete what it doesn’t absorb.

    ‘Many of the vegan collagen boosters essentially claim to offer their skin benefits by acting as “antioxidants” – these have the ability to neutralise harmful molecules known as “free radicals” which can damage skin cells.

    ‘However, the process of oxidation (free radical generation) and antioxidation isn’t a straightforward chain of events, but rather is a finely balanced system. It is possible for antioxidants themselves to become pro-oxidant when neutralising free radicals.

    ‘Whole foods often contain substances to neutralise this newly created pro-oxidant whereas an isolated supplement will not be able to do so.

    ‘Taking a supplement isn’t going to make your skin “stronger” or more resilient to the natural ageing process.’

    Crikey. Is there anything we can do?

    ‘In a nutshell, collagen supplements is all persuasive marketing,’ she explains.

    ‘Investing in a decent skincare routine of sunscreen and retinol is far more beneficial than throwing money at vegan collagen boosters, based on current data.’

    Young woman applying skincare
    Topical sincare containing retinol and SPF may be a better bet in the quest for better skin (Picture: Getty)

    Pixie Turner, a registered associate nutritionist offering no BS nutrition advice at Pixie Nutrition, agrees with Dr Mahto.

    ‘There is a complete lack of evidence suggesting collagen supplements can improve skin,’ says Pixie.

    ‘Collagen is a protein, and as such it will be digested by your body in the same way that any other source of protein would.’

    Beauty and skincare aside – can taking collagen supplements at least help our aging joints?

    ‘The idea of taking collagen supplements post-workout also makes no sense as collagen is lacking in branched chain amino acids – the key amino acids for building muscle,’ Turner explains.

    ‘A lot of the research on collagen supplementation is in rats, and so we need to be careful about extrapolating that and applying it to humans.

    ‘There is some emerging evidence that collagen supplements could benefit those who have been diagnosed with osteoarthritis, but only as part of a treatment, not as a preventative measure.

    ‘Overall, for joint protection and looking after your body’s collagen needs, I recommend regular movement, a healthy balanced diet that includes plenty of fruit and vegetables, and avoid wasting money on unnecessary supplements.

    ‘I’d always prefer people get their nutrients from food where possible. That applies whether they’re vegan or omnivores.’

    Which foods do we need to be munching on the regular for general good skin health?

    ‘A whole food vegan diet is very high in these vitamins and minerals anyway,’ advises Jessica Michael, nutrition consultant and owner of Rawgaia Superfood Skincare.

    ‘‘Whilst there are recommended daily allowances, if you are eating a well balanced whole food vegan diet, then the great news is that you should be easily exceeding your requirements.

    ‘Vitamin E can be obtained through drinking daily nut or seed milks, and from green leafy veg.

    ‘Zinc can be very easily obtained through foods such as chickpeas, lentils, legumes and nuts.’

    Jessica advises that copper can be consumed via some herbs and spices, sun-dried tomatoes, fruits, vegetables, pulses and spirulina, while manganese can be sourced through foods high in phytic acid, these include nuts, seeds beans, whole grains.

    That vital vitamin C can be found in things like citrus fruits, mango, papaya, pineapple, blackcurrants, strawberries, kale and broccoli.

    Taking a vitamin C supplement is kind of pointless if you’re chomping away on the above, as your body can’t store excess vitamin C, so it’s all just a waste of money.

    So it seems that eating a diet full of delicious, nutrient-rich food rather than popping supplements all day seems like a much wiser choice for your skin, and overall health and wellbeing.

    Crucially, it’s better for your bank balance, too.

    MORE: There's a new support website for people struggling with skin conditions

    MORE: The vegan, cruelty-free guide to skincare: Cleansers

    MORE: Is acne causing your depression? Here's what to do about it


    Woman's hand on is pouring tablets in her hand.Woman's hand on is pouring tablets in her hand.lisambowmanWoman's hand on is pouring tablets in her hand.High Angle View Of Oranges Over Colored BackgroundYoung woman applying skincareWoman's hand on is pouring tablets in her hand.Woman's hand on is pouring tablets in her hand.lisambowmanWoman's hand on is pouring tablets in her hand.High Angle View Of Oranges Over Colored BackgroundYoung woman applying skincare

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    (Picture: Havas London)

    Some people like to brag about how long penetrative sex lasts for them, telling the world how they can pump away with gay abandon for four solid hours.

    Readers with vaginas will know that sounds like a chafing nightmare, and that we’d be red raw and walking like John Wayne by the end of it.

    The thing is, these odd divergences of opinion have persisted for longer than we’d care to imagine. Women are often grinning and bearing uncomfortable sex and not knowing how to ask for something different or even that something is wrong at all.

    Durex ads tend to feature couples getting it on and having explosive orgasms at the same time, but now they’re taking a different tack; acknowledging that sexual discomfort exists and that there are ways to fix it.

    The ad asks ‘why do we still put up with uncomfortable sex?’ Good question.

    It also explains that our natural lubrication can change based on where we are in our cycle, and there’s nothing wrong with a bit of extra help.

    Obviously it’s to sell a product, but it’s an important message.

    It might not be the sexiest thing to think about the changes in your cervical mucus and discharge, but if it helps take away the stigma that comes with needing to use lube, then so be it.

    Durex - Ladies, Let's Lube (Picture: Havas London)
    Same babes, same (Picture: Havas London)

    While Durex are targeting a lower age group, lube is also useful for women who are going through the menopause or for afterwards who may experience vaginal dryness.

    Plus lube can be great for just making the average Wednesday night shag a little more interesting, and doesn’t have to be seen as some sort of specialist product that you only use if there’s a problem.

    The more we take a humorous and honest approach to what sex is like in the real world, the more we’ll have better experiences. Preferably ones that don’t involve multiple hour piston pump sessions.

    What can cause discomfort or pain during sex?

    Dryness

    Whether it’s a dryer day, due to the menopause, or simply because your body produces less lubrication, this could be the cause.

    Dryness can also occur when there hasn’t been enough foreplay and you’re not yet physically aroused.

    Reaction to products

    Some people are allergic to latex in condoms, and others are sensitive to things like shower gels or deodorants.

    Even some washing powders might irritate you, so try to work out the source and avoid it in future.

    Vulvodynia or vaginismus

    Both of these medical conditions can cause pain during penetration.

    Vaginismus can make your muscles spasm to the point the vaginal opening feels too tights to allow anything to enter.

    Vulvodynia can either cause pain in the vulva when touched, or general pain even without contact.

    What to do if you're experiencing pain during sex

    If you feel it’s a lubrication issue, you might first want to try longer foreplay to make sure you’re ready for penetration. It’s also worth noting that penetration isn’t the be-all and end-all, and that you can have perfectly great sex without it.

    Lube would be your next step (or combined with the first and incorporated into foreplay). Look for a water based lubricant that won’t affect condoms,

    If you find that pain and discomfort are becoming commonplace, you should then visit your GP who can look into other causes.

    MORE: Muslim women explain why it’s so hard for them to find a partner

    MORE: Modern Etiquette: My Tinder date doesn’t look like their pictures – what now?


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    Hotel staff in the Scottish Highlands could learn Mandarin and provide chopsticks and noodles in rooms to make Chinese tourists feel welcome, a travel expert has said.

    Visiting the scenic region is becoming increasingly popular among middle class tourists in China but cultural nuances are not often catered for.

    Monica Lee-Macpherson, chairwoman of the Scottish Highlands and Islands and Moray Chinese Association, said making a few changes would benefit the tourism industry and it starts with B&B owners.

    Asian tourists posing in front of Eilean Donan Castle in Loch Duich, Ross and Cromarty, Western Highlands of Scotland, UK. (Photo by: Arterra/UIG via Getty Images)
    Asian tourists pose in front of Eilean Donan Castle in Loch Duich, Ross and Cromarty in the Western Highlands (Picture: Arterra/UIG via Getty Images)
    Glenfinnan is a village in the Lochaber area of the Highlands, at the end of Loch Shiel, at the foot of Glenfinnan.
    The Highlands’ beauty is unrivaled in Scotland but the tourism industry could be doing more for visitors, it is claimed, (Picture:Getty Images/VisitBritain)

    Ms Lee-Macpherson, a Chinese-Scot who organises tours of stunning Highlands beauty spots, said restaurants could include more imagery in their menus and rooms should have an option of twin-beds, which are more popular with Chinese visitors, to make tourists feel more ‘at home’.

    Approximately 62,000 Chinese visitors travelled to Scotland in 2017, an increase of 51 per cent from 2016, spending a total of £44 million, according to VisitScotland.

    thumbnail for post ID 8375961Who is Chris Brown's girlfriend Ammika Harris?

    It is still well below the number of visitors from smaller countries in inland Europe, but Ms Lee-Macpherson argues Chinese people are more likely to spend money during their trips.

    She was made an MBE in 2009 for services to Chinese people in the Highlands and Moray and said they often left frustrated by a lack of facilities – including having to share bathrooms and there being nowhere to buy authentic designer goods.

    She told The Times: ‘A lot of hotels have Polish, Italian, Spanish or even Japanese speakers, but I don’t know any that have Mandarin speakers.

    ‘They don’t even learn simple phrases like “how are you?”, “good morning” or “thank you”.’

    Reflection of Kilchurn Castle in Loch Awe, Highlands, Scotland
    Reflection of Kilchurn Castle in Loch Awe, the Highlands (Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

    She added: ‘We think too much about Europeans, but how often do you see a European visitor go and buy four cashmere jumpers without even batting an eyelid?

    ‘Chinese people have new found wealth and will spend that money.’

    thumbnail for post ID 8376078Laurent Koscielny reveals what he said to Hector Bellerin after horror injury

    China Ready workshops have been hosted at various tourism conferences in Scotland including by the Scottish Tourism Alliance.

    They include how staff can approach visitors and adapt their stays to make them feel more at home.

    The Edinburgh Tourist Action Group is also providing Chinese tourism related resources to help staff understand and adapt to the culture.

    Got a story for Metro.co.uk?

    If you have a story for our news team, email us at webnews@metro.co.uk.

    You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.


    Hotel owners in Scotland told to learn Mandarin and provide Pot Noodles for Chinese touristsHotel owners in Scotland told to learn Mandarin and provide Pot Noodles for Chinese touristsnicbrunettiAsian tourists posing in front of Eilean Donan Castle in Loch Duich, Ross and Cromarty, Western Highlands of Scotland, UK. (Photo by: Arterra/UIG via Getty Images)Glenfinnan is a village in the Lochaber area of the Highlands, at the end of Loch Shiel, at the foot of Glenfinnan.Reflection of Kilchurn Castle in Loch Awe, Highlands, ScotlandHotel owners in Scotland told to learn Mandarin and provide Pot Noodles for Chinese touristsHotel owners in Scotland told to learn Mandarin and provide Pot Noodles for Chinese touristsnicbrunettiAsian tourists posing in front of Eilean Donan Castle in Loch Duich, Ross and Cromarty, Western Highlands of Scotland, UK. (Photo by: Arterra/UIG via Getty Images)Glenfinnan is a village in the Lochaber area of the Highlands, at the end of Loch Shiel, at the foot of Glenfinnan.Reflection of Kilchurn Castle in Loch Awe, Highlands, Scotland

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    (Picture: Poundland)

    Poundland is facing more criticism for selling appetite suppressants that were first spotted last year.

    Plus size model Felicity Hayward pointed out that the budget retailer is still selling the Forza product, calling it dangerous.

    Speaking on Twitter, she wrote: ‘Hello Poundland, are you aware of the health issues surrounding selling appetite suppressant products in your store?

    ‘Telling people they need to take a pill for them to stop being hungry!? You are endorsing eating disorders and selling them at that price is extremely dangerous.’

    Felicity shared a picture of the product she found in the Pounland store in Bangor, Northern Ireland with her thousands of followers.

    One of them replied and explained how cheap meal suppressants make it more accessible to all people and can be dangerous for them.

    ‘I bought something similar and they made me so Ill and shaky, I couldn’t keep still – 90 tablets for £5,’ she said.

    The product is described as containing a ‘plant-based slimming formula to support safe and healthy weight loss’ that will ‘suppress appetite and reduce food intake’.

    A spokesperson told Metro.co.uk: ‘These (products) come from a reputable supplier called Forza who can speak about the product.

    ‘They’re on sale in a very wide range of retailers including Boots, Tesco and Superdrug. Here at Poundland we always merchandise them on higher shelves with an age restriction of 18 and over.’

    Whether on higher shelves or not, the products may still be accessible to all kind of vulnerable people.

    Charity Beat has said that 1.25 million people in Britain are currently suffering from an eating disorder. They have found cases of anorexia in children as young as six.

    Though there are different factors that go into triggering eating disorders, the charity explained to Metro.co.uk that products like this don’t help.

    ‘Appetite suppressants are used by people with restrictive eating disorders like anorexia and feel it is harmful to widely distribute and promote such products.

    ‘We urge companies and individuals who market to this age group to consider the implications of their marketing for vulnerable people.’

    MORE: To the men too insecure to feel empowered by the Gillette advert – I’m sorry

    MORE: Jameela Jamil slams Avon campaign as ‘gross abuse of body positive movement’ after cellulite shaming poster

    MORE: Durex’s new advert is taking a stand against painful sex for women

    MORE: Do collagen supplements work, and is there a vegan version?


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    (Picture: SWNS)

    Artist Pascale Sellick is all of us; she decided to give up on men and the pursuit of marriage by just marrying, you know, her duvet.

    Let’s be real, it makes sense – who isn’t loyal to their bed? It’s not like a partner could give you the same comfort and ‘come to bed’ eyes as your loving, trusty bed linen.

    The 49-year-old, from Exeter, Devon, hasn’t just chosen any old sheets either, she’s vowed to be faithful to her white with red heart covers, though she will be changing it around when she feels like it.

    And get this, if you’re in the neighbourhood, you’re invited to the ‘free wedding party’ happening next month.

    Pascale Sellick from Exeter, Devon, with her duvet which she plans to marry next month. 21/01/2019 See SWNS story SWPLduvet; A woman has announced details of a lavish ceremony where she plans to marry - her DUVET. Pascale Sellick, 49, has issued an open invitation to anyone wishing to observe the moment she publicly declares her love for her favourite bedtime companion. Artist, Pascale describes herself as a "rude, crude, spectacular exhibitionist" and describes her duvet as the "most intimate and reliable relationship" she had ever had. The unusual ceremony will be held at Rougemont Gardens in Exeter, Devon, on Sunday, February 10 at 2pm followed by a "free wedding party" at The Glorious Art House in Fore Street.
    Pascale Sellick from Exeter, Devon, with her duvet which she plans to marry next month. (Picture: SWNS)

    Pascale calls herself a ‘rude, crude, spectacular exhibitionist’ and describes her duvet as the ‘most intimate and reliable relationship’ she has ever had.

    The bride-to-be is keeping the groom’s outfit on the day a surprise. But she has revealed her attire will include fluffy slippers and a nightgown, which will be complemented by a dressing gown.

    ‘My duvet has always been there for me and gives me great hugs. I love my duvet so much I would like to invite people to witness my union with the most constant, comforting companion in my life.

    ‘There will be music and a ceremony, laughs, and entertainment.’

    But you can’t just plan a duvet wedding in your sleep, it takes good organisation. So, Pascale has recruited Anna FitzGerald, from WooHoo Art Events, as her wedding planner.

    She said: ‘This is the most out there art happening to date. I’m really pleased to be involved.

    ‘Valentine’s day can be depressing for lots of people so hopefully, this will lift peoples’ spirits.

    Pascale Sellick from Exeter, Devon, with her duvet which she plans to marry next month. 21/01/2019 See SWNS story SWPLduvet; A woman has announced details of a lavish ceremony where she plans to marry - her DUVET. Pascale Sellick, 49, has issued an open invitation to anyone wishing to observe the moment she publicly declares her love for her favourite bedtime companion. Artist, Pascale describes herself as a "rude, crude, spectacular exhibitionist" and describes her duvet as the "most intimate and reliable relationship" she had ever had. The unusual ceremony will be held at Rougemont Gardens in Exeter, Devon, on Sunday, February 10 at 2pm followed by a "free wedding party" at The Glorious Art House in Fore Street.
    (Picture: SWNS)

    ‘It would be wonderful if folks could shake off their English reserve and rock up in their sleepwear for a bit of light-hearted frivolity.’

    The ceremony will be held at Rougemont Gardens in Exeter, Devon, on Sunday 10 February at 2pm. You can pop by if you’re near The Glorious Art House in Fore Street for the after party.

    The dress code is dressing gowns, pyjamas, onesies, and slippers with the option of also bringing cuddly teddies or hot water bottles if there is a cold wind.

    Talk about a bed romance.

    MORE: Woman marries herself and uses a handheld mirror to say vows

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    Woman marrying her duvetWoman marrying her duvetfaimabakar1Pascale Sellick from Exeter, Devon, with her duvet which she plans to marry next month. 21/01/2019 See SWNS story SWPLduvet; A woman has announced details of a lavish ceremony where she plans to marry - her DUVET. Pascale Sellick, 49, has issued an open invitation to anyone wishing to observe the moment she publicly declares her love for her favourite bedtime companion. Artist, Pascale describes herself as a Woman marrying her duvetWoman marrying her duvetfaimabakar1Pascale Sellick from Exeter, Devon, with her duvet which she plans to marry next month. 21/01/2019 See SWNS story SWPLduvet; A woman has announced details of a lavish ceremony where she plans to marry - her DUVET. Pascale Sellick, 49, has issued an open invitation to anyone wishing to observe the moment she publicly declares her love for her favourite bedtime companion. Artist, Pascale describes herself as a "rude, crude, spectacular exhibitionist" and describes her duvet as the "most intimate and reliable relationship" she had ever had. The unusual ceremony will be held at Rougemont Gardens in Exeter, Devon, on Sunday, February 10 at 2pm followed by a "free wedding party" at The Glorious Art House in Fore Street.Pascale Sellick from Exeter, Devon, with her duvet which she plans to marry next month. 21/01/2019 See SWNS story SWPLduvet; A woman has announced details of a lavish ceremony where she plans to marry - her DUVET. Pascale Sellick, 49, has issued an open invitation to anyone wishing to observe the moment she publicly declares her love for her favourite bedtime companion. Artist, Pascale describes herself as a "rude, crude, spectacular exhibitionist" and describes her duvet as the "most intimate and reliable relationship" she had ever had. The unusual ceremony will be held at Rougemont Gardens in Exeter, Devon, on Sunday, February 10 at 2pm followed by a "free wedding party" at The Glorious Art House in Fore Street.

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    (Picture: Hafsah Dabiri)

    It’s important for children to be exposed to different realities – especially ones which include people who look like them.

    It’s not often that Muslim youngsters come across literature that includes them; characters seldom have Muslim lifestyles.

    Seeing the lack of Muslim kids on front covers of children’s books, writer Hafsah Dabiri has written a book about young Muslim girls.

    She wanted to use the illustrated book – Basira the Basketballer says Inshallah (God-willing) – to encourage girls to get into sports and be brave.

    Writer Hafsah Dabiri has written a book to encourage Muslim girls to get into sports
    (Picture: Hafsah Dabiri)

    Hafsah told Metro.co.uk her own experiences of feeling alienated while playing sports inspired her to write the book.

    ‘My own experiences and the lack of representation within children’s books of kids who may look different or have different beliefs led me to write the book,’ she said.

    ‘I myself used to play netball and basketball and I wanted to write something for the little girls who also aspire to pursue sports. I wanted to get rid of the stigma surrounding the hijab and wanting to be sporty. It’s important for kids to see themselves within the books they read. It can be a form of empowerment for them.

    ‘Aside from this, there is also a lack of black representation within the books that are created within the Muslim community. This is symptomatic of a larger racial issue that the Muslim community, especially the next generation is recognising and working on.

    ‘Inspiration also came from my daily life, with the young Muslim children I tutor, my lived experiences as a very sporty child and also those female Muslim athletes who continue to inspire us such as Asma El Badawi and Ibtihaj Muhammad.’

    Hafsah added that as a two-time minority – a black Muslim girl – the character faces different layers of otherisation, something real-life children may experience.

    ‘The illustration plays a big part in the depiction of the character as a young black girl. Her hijab and then her curly hair adds to the realism which I wanted the character to have in being relateable to little girls who look like that.

    ‘This does not stop other children of other genders and races from finding inspiration or learning from the story but it does provide a source of empowerment for those little girls who do not see themselves within literature that is given to them.’

    We certainly need more books like this.

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    Children's book teaches young Muslim girls to get into sportsChildren's book teaches young Muslim girls to get into sportsfaimabakar1Children's book teaches young Muslim girls to get into sportsChildren's book teaches young Muslim girls to get into sportsfaimabakar1

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    newlywed happy funny couple walking in the amusement park with cotton candy.
    (Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

    Sure, flowers are lovely.

    But when there are so many alternatives to a wedding bouquet, why settle for the norm?

    We’ve seen people replace bundles of peonies with rescue puppies and kittens, brides clutching pizza on the big day, and men moving their floral decorations into their beards.

    Now the next big bouquet trend might just be candy floss.

    We’re all for it – a bouquet that doubles as a snack sounds like a grand idea, especially when you’re trying not to fall asleep during the vows.

    Pictures of bridal parties holding massive bits of candy floss have been popping up all over Instagram and Pinterest.

    We’re not surprised – that pop of pink looks pretty sweet in the wedding photos.

    Instagram Photo

    There are a few challenges you might come up against, though, should you choose to go down the candy floss bouquet route.

    First, it’s best to steer clear if it’s going to rain on your wedding day. Water will dissolve that lovely bouquet into a sticky mess.

    Secondly, you’ll need to warn your bridesmaids not to snack on their floss until after the photos are done, unless you want wildly different bouquet sizes revealing who got peckish during their ceremony.

    Instagram Photo

    And last of all, be warned if you intend on inviting any children to the wedding: you’ll need to have a good supply of the stuff.

    Any small child who sees an adult carrying sugar they can’t have will inevitably cry and cause a load of stress. Keep a candy floss machine on hand for anyone who wants a treat.

    Bear these things in mind, proceed with caution, and you’re golden. Do enjoy having a perfectly Pinterest-y day.

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    Candy floss bouquetCandy floss bouquetellencscottnewlywed happy funny couple walking in the amusement park with cotton candy.Candy floss bouquetCandy floss bouquetellencscottnewlywed happy funny couple walking in the amusement park with cotton candy.

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