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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    (Picture: YouTube/World Cancer Day)

    Most people will know at least one person affected by cancer.

    While the condition, no matter what form, sounds aggressive and terminal, there are ways to prevent them and detect them early.

    As a result, World Cancer Day has been created to raise awareness and improve survival rates and help families affected by it on 4 February every year.

    Led by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), it aims to inspire and encourage action from individuals, health professionals, and governments to improve public awareness and access to early detection, screening, and diagnosis.

    World Cancer Day Provider: YouTube/World Cancer Day Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-1l8SHSJ40
    People have been fundraising for the three-year-old campaign to raise awareness (Picture: YouTube/World Cancer Day)

    The theme of this year is ‘I Am and I Will’ and the three-year-old campaign not only aims to help those affected by it, but to shed light on how age, masculine gender norms, feelings of shame and fear, and poor health awareness contribute to the problem.

    It explains how old and young people can be vulnerable and gender stereotypes combined with a lack of men’s health promotion, can prevent men from seeking help even when they might suspect cancer early on.

    According to the World Health Organization, these are the risk factors that you can change to significantly reduce the risk of developing cancer:

    • tobacco use including cigarettes and smokeless tobacco
    • being overweight or obese
    • an unhealthy diet with low fruit and vegetable intake
    • lack of physical activity
    • alcohol use
    • sexually transmitted HPV-infection
    • infection by hepatitis or other carcinogenic infections
    • ionizing and ultraviolet radiation
    • urban air pollution
    • indoor smoke from household use of solid fuels.

    So what symptoms should you look out for?

    Lack of appetite and unexpected weight loss can take place prior to diagnosis, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), though these could also signal other conditions like diabetes.

    Blood appearing in wee or poo can also be a sign of colon cancer or prostate or bladder cancer.

    Frequent stomach problems, problems with digestion, finding it hard to swallow or pain after eating can be a sign of stomach cancer where the person may experience nausea, vomiting, indigestion, and bloating.

    Having a fever is not a usual symptom of cancer but can sometimes be a sign of leukemia or lymphoma.

    Lumps, whether in the breast, testicle, neck, and also in the arms and legs can also signal a serious issue. Persisting pain and fatigue, even after adequate sleep, could also be a sign.

    Cancer - the facts

    In 2018, there were more than 18 million new cases of cancer diagnosed of which nearly five million cases of breast, cervical, colorectal, and oral cancers could have been detected sooner and treated more effectively.

    Early detection, screening, and diagnosis have been proven to significantly improve patient survival rates and quality of life as well as significantly reduce the cost and complexity of cancer treatment.

    When a cancer is detected at an early stage – and when coupled with appropriate treatment – the chance of survival beyond five years is dramatically higher than when detected at a later stage when the tumour has spread and the disease is more advanced.

    Around one-third of deaths from cancer are due to the five leading behavioural and dietary risks: high body mass index, low fruit and vegetable intake, lack of physical activity, tobacco use, and alcohol use.

    The World Health Organization’s advice is to avoid the associated risk factors, vaccinate against the HPV and hepatitis B virus, control occupational hazards and reduce exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    The NHS also has lots of information on prevention, treatment, and spotting the signs.

    MORE: Photos show mum with mastectomy scars breastfeeding after being told she couldn’t have another child

    MORE: Millennials face increased risk of cancer ‘because they’re so fat’

    MORE: Terminally ill woman who was ‘supposed to die last month’ attends her own funeral


    World Cancer DayWorld Cancer Dayfaimabakar1World Cancer Day Provider: YouTube/World Cancer Day Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-1l8SHSJ40World Cancer DayWorld Cancer Dayfaimabakar1World Cancer Day Provider: YouTube/World Cancer Day Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-1l8SHSJ40

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    (Picture: CPG Photography)

    You might not know yet, but tomorrow is World Nutella Day.

    For lovers of the chocolate hazelnut spread, it’s a day of celebration.

    And now you can have it with every meal, whether sweet or savoury.

    Deliveroo and Kabab are launching the Nutella Kebab for the occasion.

    It’s available throughout this week, even though the day itself is tomorrow.

    The chicken is marinated in the spread for six hours before it is flame grilled to perfection.

    Chicken marinated in Nutella kebab Credit: CPG Photography
    (Picture: CPG Photography)

    The chicken is also seasoned with cumin, cayenne pepper and fresh lemon juice.

    Joe Groves at Deliveroo said: ‘World Nutella Day is fast becoming one of the craziest food days in the calendar.

    ‘We love any excuse to come up with an oddball dish and today is no exception. Deliveroo is all about giving Brits the chance to try any and all foods they fancy, no judgement here Britain.’

    Chicken marinated in Nutella kebab Credit: CPG Photography
    (Picture: CPG Photography)

    Phil Hinitt at Kabab added: ‘At Kabab we’re really flexible with flavours and love to give unconventional pairings a try, so when Deliveoro mentioned World Nutella Day to us, it didn’t take much convincing.

    ‘We love pairing this with our Halloumi Fries and Harrissa Yoghurt, go on, give it go.’

    The Nutella Kebab will be sold across all of Kabab’s sites this week via Deliveroo, priced at £9.

    MORE: Woman who plans to marry duvet gets cold feet after being called ‘duvet lady’

    MORE: World Cancer Day 2019: Themes, facts, and symptoms you should look out for


    Chicken marinated in Nutella kebabChicken marinated in Nutella kebablauraabernethy6Chicken marinated in Nutella kebab Credit: CPG PhotographyChicken marinated in Nutella kebab Credit: CPG PhotographyChicken marinated in Nutella kebabChicken marinated in Nutella kebablauraabernethy6Chicken marinated in Nutella kebab Credit: CPG PhotographyChicken marinated in Nutella kebab Credit: CPG Photography

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    (Picture: SWNS)

    A dog called Hector has been branded as the ‘loneliest dog in Britain’ after spending more than 500 days at an animal shelter.

    Staff and volunteers are desperately trying to find a home for their loneliest pup, who was rescued in October 2017 over welfare concerns.

    But despite having a small fan club online, the RSPCA’s Little Valley Animal Shelter in Exeter, Devon, has been unable to find him a ‘forever’ home.

    While scores of his four-legged friends have found their special someone - one dog at a Devon rescue centre has been waiting more than 500 days for his chance at happiness. See SWNS story SWPLlonely. Staff and volunteers at RSPCA Little Valley Animal Shelter are desperately trying to find the paw-fect home for their loneliest pooch. Two-year-old lurcher Hector arrived at the RSPCA?s Little Valley Animal Shelter in October 2017, having been brought in to the centre by an RSPCA inspector due to welfare concerns - but despite having a small fan club online, he still hasn?t found his fur-ever home. After spending his second Christmas at the animal rescue centre, the team at desperately hoping to find the handsome, clever lad somewhere to call his own, surrounded by people who love him as much as he loves them.
    (Picture: SWNS)

    Shelter manager, Jo Evans, said: ‘Hector is hilarious. He never fails to make us smile and is a firm favourite with all who meet him.

    ‘He’s adored by staff and we can’t understand why he is always overlooked. This big lad has lots of love to give so if you have space in your heart and home then please get in touch.

    While scores of his four-legged friends have found their special someone - one dog at a Devon rescue centre has been waiting more than 500 days for his chance at happiness. See SWNS story SWPLlonely. Staff and volunteers at RSPCA Little Valley Animal Shelter are desperately trying to find the paw-fect home for their loneliest pooch. Two-year-old lurcher Hector arrived at the RSPCA?s Little Valley Animal Shelter in October 2017, having been brought in to the centre by an RSPCA inspector due to welfare concerns - but despite having a small fan club online, he still hasn?t found his fur-ever home. After spending his second Christmas at the animal rescue centre, the team at desperately hoping to find the handsome, clever lad somewhere to call his own, surrounded by people who love him as much as he loves them.
    (Picture: SWNS)

    ‘He’s an active boy who is looking for like-minded owners who can take him on plenty of adventures. He especially loves the beach, and we have learnt he likes to swim.’

    According to the rescue shelter, Hector absolutely loves meeting and playing with other dogs and could happily live with older children – though he would be best suited to being the only pet in the home.

    If you’re able to offer the two-year-old pup a home, please contact Little Valley on 01392 439898.

    MORE: World Cancer Day 2019: Themes, facts, and symptoms you should look out for

    MORE: Woman who plans to marry duvet gets cold feet after being called ‘duvet lady’


    Loneliest dogLoneliest doghattiegladwellmetroWhile scores of his four-legged friends have found their special someone - one dog at a Devon rescue centre has been waiting more than 500 days for his chance at happiness. See SWNS story SWPLlonely. Staff and volunteers at RSPCA Little Valley Animal Shelter are desperately trying to find the paw-fect home for their loneliest pooch. Two-year-old lurcher Hector arrived at the RSPCA?s Little Valley Animal Shelter in October 2017, having been brought in to the centre by an RSPCA inspector due to welfare concerns - but despite having a small fan club online, he still hasn?t found his fur-ever home. After spending his second Christmas at the animal rescue centre, the team at desperately hoping to find the handsome, clever lad somewhere to call his own, surrounded by people who love him as much as he loves them.While scores of his four-legged friends have found their special someone - one dog at a Devon rescue centre has been waiting more than 500 days for his chance at happiness. See SWNS story SWPLlonely. Staff and volunteers at RSPCA Little Valley Animal Shelter are desperately trying to find the paw-fect home for their loneliest pooch. Two-year-old lurcher Hector arrived at the RSPCA?s Little Valley Animal Shelter in October 2017, having been brought in to the centre by an RSPCA inspector due to welfare concerns - but despite having a small fan club online, he still hasn?t found his fur-ever home. After spending his second Christmas at the animal rescue centre, the team at desperately hoping to find the handsome, clever lad somewhere to call his own, surrounded by people who love him as much as he loves them.Loneliest dogLoneliest doghattiegladwellmetroWhile scores of his four-legged friends have found their special someone - one dog at a Devon rescue centre has been waiting more than 500 days for his chance at happiness. See SWNS story SWPLlonely. Staff and volunteers at RSPCA Little Valley Animal Shelter are desperately trying to find the paw-fect home for their loneliest pooch. Two-year-old lurcher Hector arrived at the RSPCA?s Little Valley Animal Shelter in October 2017, having been brought in to the centre by an RSPCA inspector due to welfare concerns - but despite having a small fan club online, he still hasn?t found his fur-ever home. After spending his second Christmas at the animal rescue centre, the team at desperately hoping to find the handsome, clever lad somewhere to call his own, surrounded by people who love him as much as he loves them.While scores of his four-legged friends have found their special someone - one dog at a Devon rescue centre has been waiting more than 500 days for his chance at happiness. See SWNS story SWPLlonely. Staff and volunteers at RSPCA Little Valley Animal Shelter are desperately trying to find the paw-fect home for their loneliest pooch. Two-year-old lurcher Hector arrived at the RSPCA?s Little Valley Animal Shelter in October 2017, having been brought in to the centre by an RSPCA inspector due to welfare concerns - but despite having a small fan club online, he still hasn?t found his fur-ever home. After spending his second Christmas at the animal rescue centre, the team at desperately hoping to find the handsome, clever lad somewhere to call his own, surrounded by people who love him as much as he loves them.

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    Royal Caribbean is looking to pay someone a six-figure salary to travel around the world as a ‘global experience hunter’.

    The role is for a Shore Explorer apprentice to go on an all-expenses paid world trip.

    In addition to Japan, Alaska, Europe and the Middle East, they will be one of the first to visit Perfect Day at CocoCay – a new and exclusive private island in the Caribbean

    Oh, and all you have to do is capture your experiences on Instagram.

    We know, it sounds amazing.

    (Picture: Royal Caribbean International)

    Candidates can apply via Instagram for the opportunity to seek out and test extraordinary shore experiences in some of the most jaw-dropping destinations across the globe – while getting paid a salary equivalent to over £100,000 per year.

    Building on the success of its ‘Intern-ship’ programme two years ago, the lucky candidate will act as an apprentice to Royal Caribbean’s Instagrammer-in-Chief, Russ Francis, who started the job after applying in 2016.

    The chosen apprentice will embark on a global trip, seeking out new land-based experiences that will ultimately influence the brand’s shore excursion programme for 2019 and beyond.

    OV, Ovation of the Seas, FlowRider, onboard surfing, woman on surf board, looking out over majestic view of Alaska mountains, ice floes, scenic, adventure, fun, (comp image with stock photo from Shutterstock), NOTE: This is a composite photo made to represent Ovation of the Seas in Alaska. When using this image; please include this disclaimer: This image is an artistic rendering of Ovation of the Seas. Features vary by ship.
    (Picture: Royal Caribbean International)

    Their only daily task will be capturing their experiences on Instagram, Insta-Stories and IGTV.

    They will then have the chance to enjoy a range of ‘bucket list experiences’ such as visiting a glacier in Alaska, exploring Osaka in Japan, white water rafting in the Norwegian Fjords, or riding the world’s longest urban zip wire in Dubai.

    The successful candidate will be selected by an independent panel of judges consisting of The Vamps’ writer and guitarist and contestant in I’m A Celebrit Get Me Out of Here! 2018 James McVey, Ben Bouldin, Managing Director Royal Caribbean International UK & Ireland, Nadia El Ferdaoussi, a travel writer, and Russ Francis.

    Royal Caribbean want to give you ?2k a month to travel the world and instagram stuff Credit: Royal Caribbean International
    (Picture: Royal Caribbean International)

    James McVey said: ‘My jungle experience taught me that you really can’t beat the thrill of exploring new destinations and experiences – whether on land or sea – and that’s what becoming a Shore Explorer is all about.

    ‘I’m so excited to be working with Royal Caribbean to find the perfect person for this new Apprentice-Ship; someone who has a passion for travel, exploration and seeking out new and extraordinary experiences around the world. And, of course, they have to be brilliant at sharing their adventure online too.’

    So, how do you apply? Well, all you have to do is share your favourite travel experience in a picture or video on Instagram, Insta Stories or IGTV tagging #ShoreExplorer and @RoyalCaribbeanUK.

    You must be 21 or over, hold a valid passport and be able to travel this year to apply.

    A Royal Caribbean spokesperson said: ‘We’re looking for an adrenaline junkie who is not only hungry for adventure, but also has a unique ability to capture a moment and tell a story in a simple social media post.

    ‘We already offer a huge amount of incredible, once-in-a-lifetime, on-land experiences as part of our cruise holidays – from zip wires and white water rafting, to walking on glaciers and hot air balloon rides. By launching this position, we’re hoping that the winning candidate will take our shore excursion programme to the next level.’

    MORE: World Cancer Day 2019: Themes, facts, and symptoms you should look out for

    MORE: Woman who plans to marry duvet gets cold feet after being called ‘duvet lady’


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    Poet Tolu Agbelusi, is one of the chosen authors to be published (Picture: Jacaranda/Metro.co.uk)

    Jacardanda Books have announced that they will publish 20 black authors in 2020 to help ‘normalise’ black writing in the UK.

    The initiative, funded by £25,000 donated by an unnamed group of individuals, is the first time that one publisher has committed to publishing that many black British writers in one year.

    The move comes as a survey found that only around 11% of the publishing workforce identified as BAME across the UK.

    In London, that number jumped to 40%, but regionally there is a stark lack of any non-white influence when it comes to publishing fiction, non-fiction and poetry.

    Independent publishers Jacaranda aim to change this with their #TwentyIn2020 campaign, which will elevate the voices of emerging black writers and work towards greater inclusivity in the industry.

    ‘The aim is for “Twenty in 2020” is to push diverse publishing further than it has ever been in the UK,’ says editorial manager, Magdalene Abraha.

    ‘The initiative is essentially a commitment to normalize diverse books, which means improving the publishing landscape for all.

    ‘The titles that have been selected are passionate, raw and moving pieces of work and we truly hope that this will encourage and inspire the publishing industry to publish more diversely.’

    Maame Blue is publishing a novel called Bad Love (Picture: Jacaranda/Metro.co.uk)

    According to the survey, which looked at 6,432 individuals in the publishing industry, 11.6% of respondents identified as BAME – lower than the UK population of 14%.

    A 2017 online survey of 1,000 publishers that found 90% of the workforce was white.

    Jacardana feel that the publishing industry is currently failing to represent the true diversity of the country, particularly in regional areas outside of London.

    The twenty books

    Fiction

    Deadly Sacrifice by Stella Ahmadu
    Of Mice and Men by DD Armstrong
    Bad Love by Maame Blue
    How to Make Sticky Finger Soup by Emmanuella Dekonor
    If I Don’t Have You by Sareeta Domingo
    The Street Hawkers Apprentice by Kabir Kareem-Bello
    Love Again by Rasheda Ashanti Malcolm
    Under Solomon Skies by Berni Sorga-Millwood
    Black Star by Stephen Thompson
    Lote by Shola von Rheinhold

    Non-fiction

    Through the Leopards Gaze by Njambi McGrath
    The Space Between Black and White by Esuantsiwa Jane Goldsmith A Circle of Five by Harris Joshua
    Are We Home Yet? by Kate Massey
    Black History Walks by Tony Warner

    Poetry

    Locating Strong Woman by Tolu Agbelusi
    Jamakspeare by Brenda Garrick
    The First Collection by Sarah Lipton-Sidibeh
    Untitled by Hibaq Osman
    On Reflection by Adjoa Wiredu

    One author who has been chosen to publish her novel as part of the campaign is Shola von Rheinhold. She thinks diversity in literature is vitally important.

    ‘When in 2016 figures about race in British publishing were circulated, even unpublished black writers were shocked at how bleak things were,’ explains Shola.

    ‘Out of 165,000 new titles only 100 were by writers of colour. 33 were cookbooks. 33 were self-published. Out of that remaining 34, how many do you think were novels? How many were black British novels? Black literary fiction? We do know that there was only one black debut by a man that year.

    ‘A few commercially-driven diversity schemes aren’t going to change this.

    ‘Jacaranda’s publishing twenty black British writers in 2020 is much more than a diversity scheme, it’s a radical act. I don’t know if any British publishing house will have published this many black authors in a year, so they are literally making history and I’m fortunate to be part of it.’

    Another chosen author, Hibaq Osman, hopes that the scheme will create a legacy for the future of other black British writers.

    ‘It not only validates my own work but the work of other writers such as myself,’ says Hibaq.

    ‘With Twenty in 2020 getting the push and support of the public in this way, I hope the British publishing landscape will evolve beyond tokens and work toward more innovative and diverse works.’

    MORE: The founders of the Black Girl’s Book Club want to make sure black women are never an afterthought

    MORE: This woman has launched a discount card specifically to promote black-owned businesses

    MORE: Mixed Up: ‘I used to pretend I understood Swahili out of shame and guilt’


    Tolu-f709Tolu-f709nataliemorris88Tolu-f709Tolu-f709nataliemorris88

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    (Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.
    (Picture: Caters News)

    A woman addicted to KFC has taken her love of the fast food chain to the next level by getting its logo tattooed on her lip.

    After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was ‘deeply meaningful and important’ to her.

    The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while – but was ultimately going to wait for the right moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo.

    And while on holiday in November 2018, Tabatha suddenly decided to go under the needle, getting a tribute to the food that makes her ‘happier than anything else in the world’ – KFC.

    Tabatha, who works in banking, said: ‘I told my parents I wanted to get a tattoo, and they said I could get inked with something that was important to me.

    Pic by Tabatha Andrade/Caters News - (Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.
    (Picture: Tabatha Andrade/Caters News)

    ‘I was on holidays up in Queensland when the urge just suddenly came to me, and I decided to finally do it.

    ‘KFC is my favourite fast food. I go there at least once a week, if not more.

    ‘It does mean a lot to me, so it seemed fitting to get this tattoo.

    ‘I really love chicken. All my friends call me the chicken connoisseur.

    ‘I even named my dog ‘nugget’, because I’m obsessed with chicken nuggets.’

    Tabatha- who also has another tattoo of the word ‘family’ – said she got the idea of getting a lip tattoo from Kendall Jenner.

    Pic by Tabatha Andrade/Caters News - (Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.
    (Picture: Tabatha Andrade/Caters News)

    And despite looking painful, Tabatha said getting her inner lip inked ‘did not hurt at all’.

    Tabatha also hopes that her unique tattoo might help her score a free meal or two from KFC.

    She said: ‘I have absolutely no regrets. It’s my favourite tattoo.

    ‘I got the idea of doing it on the lip from Kendall Jenner. It seems to be popular these days, so I just thought why not.

    ‘I showed my parents when I came home, and they thought it was fake. But they’re okay with it now.

    ‘The tattoo artist laughed so hard when I told him what I wanted.

    ‘It didn’t hurt at all. It only took about two minutes.

    ‘I love the shock I get from people when I pull down my lip and show them. It’s always so funny.

    ‘It would be awesome if they gave me free KFC because of it. Let’s see what happens.’

    MORE: Royal Caribbean wants to pay someone £100,000 to travel the world

    MORE: Love tree planted to woo sweetheart 100 years ago


    KFC tattooKFC tattoohattiegladwellmetro(Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.Pic by Tabatha Andrade/Caters News - (Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.Pic by Tabatha Andrade/Caters News - (Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.KFC tattooKFC tattoohattiegladwellmetro(Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.Pic by Tabatha Andrade/Caters News - (Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.Pic by Tabatha Andrade/Caters News - (Pictured: Tabatha Andrade) - A KFC addict has taken her love of fried chicken to the next level by getting the fast food chains logo tattooed on her LIP. After discussing the idea of getting a tattoo with her parents, Tabatha Andrade said they warned her that she should only get inked with something that was deeply meaningful and important to her. The 20-year-old from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, said she thought about it for a while but was ultimately going to wait for the moment to spontaneously get inked with the perfect tattoo. And it was while on holidays in November 2018 that Tabatha suddenly decided to take the plunge and pay homage to the thing that makes her happier than anything else in the world KFC. SEE CATERS COPY.

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    Recently, the egg that captivated the world has been seen cracking under the pressures of social media, in an extremely important video over on Instagram.

    The Instagram egg hit the world record for the most liked photo on the app – amassing over 52 million likes, after the account posted a photo of the egg alongside the caption: ‘Let’s set a world record together and get the most liked post on Instagram. Beating the current world record held by Kylie Jenner (18 million)! We got this’.

    Since the post, on 4 January, the account has shared four more photos of the egg over the space of January, except this time, the egg is cracked – with more and more cracks appearing with each photo.

    Instagram Photo

    The account teased what was going on, but its latest video reveals that it was all a build up to a very important message: to make sure you’re looking after your mental health and not suffering alone.

    In the final video, after a series of cracked egg photos, the egg finally cracks – representing cracking under the pressures of social media – and a message on the video reads: ‘Hi. I’m the World_Record_Egg (you may have heard of me).

    ‘Recently I’ve started to crack. The pressure of social media is getting to me.

    Instagram Photo

    ‘If you’re struggling too, talk to someone. We got this.’

    Since the video was posted, it’s been viewed nearly two million times, and has received thousands of comments praising the makers behind the video.

    One person wrote: ‘This is utterly adorable and I love the message behind this! I told myself I was silly for following an egg account, but no regrets!’

    Another said: ‘The wait is finally over but it was worth it to have such a great message!’

    Instagram Photo

    Mental Health America, a non-profit based in Alexandra, Virginia, was advertised in the video.

    They have since released a statement in regards to the video.

    They tweeted: ‘We’d like to thank #TalkingEgg for shining a limelight on #mentalhealth tonight with an important message.

    ‘Not everyone chooses to #fightintheopen for mental health, but you did for the one in five Americans living with a mental health condition.’

    MORE: Royal Caribbean wants to pay someone £100,000 to travel the world

    MORE: Love tree planted to woo sweetheart 100 years ago


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    Maya Scarlette has ‘lobster claw syndrome’ with three fingers and has created own clothing company (Picture: Maya Scarlette)

    Maya Scarlette, from London, was born with a limb deficiency, ectrodactyly – also known as lobster claw syndrome.

    Though the condition varies from person to person, for her it’s meant losing digits on both hands and feet, a rarity affecting her balance and grip.

    Despite the difficulties she’s faced – which includes calling out companies like Apple for not being user-friendly for disabled people – Maya, 26, has started her own business making bras.

    Inspired by her Caribbean heritage and carnival culture, Maya decided to start making her own fun outfits with her friends which received a lot of love, convincing Maya to start her business around three years ago.

    She told Metro.co.uk about she doesn’t let her condition define her nor stop her from pursuing her dreams.

    She has one finger on one hand and two on the other (Picture: Maya Scarlette)

    Maya explains how she coped with the condition in her childhood.

    ‘As a child I faced difficulties using certain items that were created for people with a full set of fingers. Technology and the structure of everyday items hadn’t reached a point where they were accessible for my type of disability.

    ‘I’d find myself figuring out alternative ways to complete everyday tasks or ask for help from others which would sometimes take me twice as long or could be frustrating. Now with years of practice most tasks have become second nature to me.

    (Picture: Maya Scarlette)

    ‘I had a really positive educational experience, the department that dealt with learning difficulties and disabilities were always very hands-on with giving me the support that I needed.

    ‘When I think about it, the limitations I experience as a child somehow sparked my creative curiosity. I loved drawing and eventually taught myself how to sew. I’ve always found arts and craft-like projects quite therapeutic as they gave me the space to be experimental.

    ‘My friends and family were also supportive.

    ‘I can’t take all the credit for learning how to sew/ design. My mum (who has experience with designing) has always assisted me in figuring out my own way of using equipment and sewing independently. She knows the ins and outs of my disability so when I’m struggling she always gives me the best insight.’

    Maya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing company
    Maya’s friends trying on her creations (Picture: Maya Scarlette)

    When Maya finds her work challenging, she asks her strong support system for help or asks to be taught an alternative way of doing it.

    Even with a physical difference, she’s keen on having her own version of independence and wants to live a normal life.

    ‘I would be lying if I said I don’t get down on myself or feel like certain things aren’t ‘Maya friendly’ but it comes with the territory of living with a disability,’ she added.

    ‘There’s still quite a lot of work to be done but I think with inclusivity being a major topic of discussion in the media retails are shifting their views regarding product design.’

    Maya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing company
    Maya advertising one of her creations (Picture: Maya Scarlette)

    Maya said her bra designs are influenced by her Caribbean heritage and Notting Hill Carnival where she first started making her own costumes.

    From that, she began to experiment more with hand-making carnival costumes and designed costumes for her friends the following year. Now it’s become an annual tradition.

    Eventually, other people started enquiring about her bras, designs and placing orders – giving Maya the confidence to try and turn what essentially started as a hobby into a business.

    Maya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing company
    (Picture: Maya Scarlette)

    ‘I’m self-taught which means I’m constantly playing around with designs and its techniques/construction. All bodies are different so I want to be able to cater to everyone. Another difficulty I face is time. We’re in a climate where fast fashion is pretty dominant and people expect things to be delivered on demand.

    ‘For some designs, I will need a good amount of time to execute a piece which may be tedious but I want the person who I’m making a bra for to feel confident and comfortable in what they wear.’

    Maya’s work can be found on Instagram and through the hashtag, she uses on social media, #DoItWithNoHands.

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    Lobster claw fashionLobster claw fashionfaimabakar1Maya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing companyMaya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing companyMaya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing companyLobster claw fashionLobster claw fashionfaimabakar1Maya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing companyMaya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing companyMaya Patterson with 'lobster claw' syndrome, with 2 fingers on each hand creates own clothing company

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    Muslim sex attack victims are more believable according to a study - but it's outdated to think that
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Muslim sexual assault victims who wear a headscarf or niqab (face covering) in court are seen as being a more credible witness than women who are uncovered, a new study claims, perpetuating the tired old idea that the more clothes you wear, the less blameable you are for your attack.

    This is damaging to Muslim women and non-Muslim women alike because both deserve to be believed – not because they cover up and not because they don’t – but because they are victims of sexual trauma who have little to gain by lying about their attacks (and very few people, just two per cent, do).

    And it’s not just that. The findings show how Muslim women are pigeonholed as sexually submissive and lacking agency. While the courtroom setting may side with Muslim women, outside of it they are not safe from prejudice.

    The only time Muslim women’s modesty benefits them in society is when it aligns with outdated patriarchal and sexist views: that covered up women are less deserving of assault.

    We desperately need to stop basing women’s worth and credibility upon the clothes they wear.

    Women who wear Muslim garments in court are viewed as more credible witnesses. See NATIONAL story NNMUSLIM. Sex attack victims who wear Muslim garments in court are seen as being a more credible witnesses than those women who are uncovered. Women in the niqab or hijab were seen as more believable than a woman in a balaclava while a woman whose face was uncovered was seen as the least credible. It had been expected women who wear the niqab where the whole face is covered apart from the eyes would be less believed because jurors can see facial expressions. British and Canadian scientists investigated the importance of being able to see the face to judge credibility among witnesses, along with the importance of religious garments in a series of re-enacted scenarios. They hypothesised women who covered their faces would face discrimination when in fact it was the opposite. Women in the niqab or wearing the hijab which covers the hair experienced "positive biases" compared to those wearing a balaclava but uncovered women fared worst. The surprising finds could be down to the fact the religious garments may signal that the wearer is more honest because of a positive view of religion.
    Women who wear Muslim garments in court were viewed as more credible witnesses as part of a study (Picture: Lancaster University)

    In the study, women in a niqab or wearing the hijab, which covers the hair, experienced ‘positive biases’ compared to those wearing a balaclava – but ‘uncovered’ women fared worst.

    The results could signal that those showing their hair or skin are thought to be sexually liberal and therefore more deserving of an attack (a testament to the ‘she was asking for it’ culture of rape), it could also be because of how we perceive religious followers.

    A religious affiliation signals that the wearer is more honest because we generally have a positive view of the character of people who follow a religion.

    But ultimately the findings prescribe to tired tropes about Muslim women.

    If their clothes help them be believed in terms of sexual assault allegations, what does it do for them for other cases – ones related to religion, for instance? The very same Muslim garments would work against Muslim women or men if the case was to do with terrorism, as people often conflate the two.

    In fact, outside a court setting, Muslim women become targets of hate crime by being visibly Muslim.

    It’s disturbing to think that what a victim wears has an effect on their attack, and their likeliness of being believed over it.

    What about the rape and assault of women who are covered up, whether Muslim or not? It’s not as if they are free from sexual harm.

    Would the results be the same if it had been a black woman in a hijab or niqab, too?

    The fact that a woman in a balaclava – something pretty incongruous in a courtroom setting – is more likely to be seen as credible over a woman who shows her face shows how reluctant people are to take the word of the average woman.

    Judging women by their clothes doesn’t benefit Muslim women anywhere except in this isolated setting. Neither does it help other women who also had no hand in being attacked and yet have the onus shifted on them.

    Let’s not shift the conversation from why attackers attack to how victims become victims.

    While more empirical research is needed in this area, one thing is clear: women are not fair game, despite their clothes or behaviour before or after the attack. It’s time people, jurors or otherwise, learned to understand that.

    MORE: Men scared of women post #MeToo need to be educated not cancelled

    MORE: H&M’s full-coverage clothing line is great, but the term ‘modest’ really isn’t

    MORE: Dad and his three kids pose with guns in response to Gillette’s #MeToo-inspired advert


    Muslim sex attack victims are more believable according to a study - but it's outdated to think thatfaimabakar1Women who wear Muslim garments in court are viewed as more credible witnesses. See NATIONAL story NNMUSLIM. Sex attack victims who wear Muslim garments in court are seen as being a more credible witnesses than those women who are uncovered. Women in the niqab or hijab were seen as more believable than a woman in a balaclava while a woman whose face was uncovered was seen as the least credible. It had been expected women who wear the niqab where the whole face is covered apart from the eyes would be less believed because jurors can see facial expressions. British and Canadian scientists investigated the importance of being able to see the face to judge credibility among witnesses, along with the importance of religious garments in a series of re-enacted scenarios. They hypothesised women who covered their faces would face discrimination when in fact it was the opposite. Women in the niqab or wearing the hijab which covers the hair experienced Muslim sex attack victims are more believable according to a study - but it's outdated to think thatfaimabakar1Women who wear Muslim garments in court are viewed as more credible witnesses. See NATIONAL story NNMUSLIM. Sex attack victims who wear Muslim garments in court are seen as being a more credible witnesses than those women who are uncovered. Women in the niqab or hijab were seen as more believable than a woman in a balaclava while a woman whose face was uncovered was seen as the least credible. It had been expected women who wear the niqab where the whole face is covered apart from the eyes would be less believed because jurors can see facial expressions. British and Canadian scientists investigated the importance of being able to see the face to judge credibility among witnesses, along with the importance of religious garments in a series of re-enacted scenarios. They hypothesised women who covered their faces would face discrimination when in fact it was the opposite. Women in the niqab or wearing the hijab which covers the hair experienced "positive biases" compared to those wearing a balaclava but uncovered women fared worst. The surprising finds could be down to the fact the religious garments may signal that the wearer is more honest because of a positive view of religion.

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    Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk
    Caption: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk

    Your friends have had a baby.

    You’re delighted for them. Of course you are. They’ve combined DNA and made a small human, contributed to the propagation of the human race and while they’re going to be quite tired for a bit, they’ve done something amazing.

    That doesn’t, however, mean that you want to be a part of the whole child rearing circus.

    The only question more grown up than ‘will you be my bridesmaid?’ is ‘Would you like to be a godparent?’

    Unlike being a bridesmaid which, let’s face it, is a lot of work but over at the end of the wedding, being a godparent doesn’t have an end date. In theory you’re off the hook when the child turns 18 or 21, but even then, that’s a long time to be buying cards and presents.

    Traditionally a godparent is supposed to help raise the child in God’s image, teach it about Christianity and look after the child if the parents die.

    These day we’re lots of us are less religious, so godparenting can be more of a secular role, but you’re still supposed to be around for babysitting and days out when they’re small, and advice giving when they’re older.

    Most of the time godparents aren’t expected to take custody of the children in the event of the parent’s death, and if they are expecting that then they should certainly talk to you about it before you’re signed up. It’ll need to be stipulated in their will. Cheerful, right?

    Anyway. You don’t want to be a godparent. You’ve had a think about it, assessed how much it’s going to cost you in either money or Saturday mornings where you’ve got to take your hangover to a birthday party full of screaming kids, and you’ve decided that it’s a no. Is that legit?

    The short answer is yes, of course. You’re not obliged to commit to anything you don’t want to do.

    The long answer is that while it’s totally okay to say no, you need to handle it carefully. Your friend is sleep deprived and hormonal, so turning down a lovely offer of recognition might come across as hurtful. As we’ve often said in Modern Etiquette, the best way to tell someone bad news will vary.

    You have to assess whether your friend would rather have a message or email that they can read privately and process their hurt alone, or whether they value face to face conversation. Both are fine, as long as you’ve chosen on the basis of what the friend needs, not what is least painful for you.

    When it comes to turning down a godparentship you should gently take responsibility for the choice, saying something like ‘I’m so excited to get to know her and be in her life, but I’m not sure that I’m organised enough to be a formal godparent – I’d hate to let her down.’

    If the parents are religious you could also try the ‘I’m excited to be in his life, but I’m an atheist’ route.

    However you say no, it’s important to actually say it rather than resentfully taking the job and then being bad at it forever.

    According to Jo Bryant for Debretts, it might actually cause less damage to decline when asked to be a godparent than to go through with it, be a rubbish one and fall out with your friends over your lack of interest in their spawn.

    ‘If you think that you are not up to the role or that the parents’ expectations may be too much, then it is best to decline politely.

    ‘Some adults collect godchildren like stamps; they end up with an impressive collection but never do anything with them – if you haven’t got the time or interest, then be honest and decline the role.’

    Yes, it’s an awkward conversation. But in three years time when you’re in bed watching Netflix on a Saturday morning rather than playing pass the parcel with kids who are hopped up on E numbers, you’ll be glad you did it.

    Being a godparent is a special, wonderful job, and when it goes right it’s a privilege. But when it goes wrong it can ruin friendships, so if you’re not sure about it then don’t take the risk.

    Modern Etiquette is a weekly series. Rather than telling you what to do with a salad crescent or which shoes are most appropriate for Ascot, we’ll be working out how to navigate shared houses, drugs, ex-boyfriends and that moment when you send the screenshot of the person you’re bitching about to them. 

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    Sperm donor originalSperm donor originalrebeccacnreidElla Byworth for Metro.co.ukSperm donor originalSperm donor originalrebeccacnreidElla Byworth for Metro.co.uk

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    (Picture: Ella Byworth)

    MP Jess Phillips has come under fire for allegedly presenting herself as working class when (according to Twitter users who have no connection to the family) her mother apparently earned a six figure salary.

    The criticism came from Ashok Kumar, an academic at Birkbeck University.

    Jess Phillips then replied saying: ‘My mom is dead and never had a six figure salary, and I think you’ve missed the point I always thought I was middle class until I went to Westminster which is what I said. Please try to deal in facts at least when spewing bile.’

    Whether or not Jess Phillips is guilty of playing up to her ‘working class’ origins is a matter of personal opinion. She is on the record discussing having a working class background, but she’s also clarified that she considered herself quite well to do before Westminster.

    Jess Phillips is a perfect example of how the class that you feel you are isn’t always the same as the class other people perceive you to be.

    Visit any predominantly middle class university and you’ll find scores of middle and upper middle class teenagers dressed in Kappa tracksuits, smoking Sovereigns and speaking in a mockney accent in a bid to disguise their privileged backgrounds.

    Areas like Walthamstow, Brixton and Peckham, which were once known for high levels of violent crime and social housing, have now become a playground for the types of people who, to quote Jarvis Cocker, ‘think that poor is cool’. House prices in Peckham rose by 45.7 per cent between April 2014 and April 2018.

    Admittedly some of the migration to these parts of London is motivated by a lack of affordable housing. But the prevalence of trendy bars and pop-up restaurants in places like Brixton tells you everything you need to know. Areas that ‘gritty’ and ‘urban’ are cool. Which is why they’re being rapidly gentrified.

    I cannot count the number of times I’ve sat at a dinner party with a degree-level educated, London-based professional who earns over £40K, but insists that they are working class. Not that their childhood was, or that their background was, but that they currently are.

    Just last week the former head of public school Harrow said that his former pupils speak ‘Estuary English’ in a bid to sound less grand. Who could forget the time that David ‘call me Dave’ Cameron tried to solve the issue of terrorism and come across like a man of the people with the words ‘You ain’t no Muslim bruv.’

    Lovely middle class Chris Martin (Photo: Getty Images)

    Working class culture is cool. It’s responsible for artists and musicians and writers. It created the angry, passionate, hungry people who changed the world. The working class produced Pulp and Oasis. The middle classes are responsible for Coldplay and Keane.

    Lower middle class is synonymous with suburban homes, net curtains and calling napkins ‘serviettes’ because it’s French. It’s going to Zizzi instead of Pizza Hut because it’s fancier.

    It’s a sort of aspirational, effort-filled class sandwiched between being working class and upper middle class. It’s the class of being told to say ‘pardon’ instead of ‘what’ and worrying about what the neighbors think.

    Being upper middle class means you can skip the driving gloves and mock Tudor houses, but does mark you out as a spoiled brat, a future Tory MP. A latter day Verruca Salt.

    No wonder fellow Metro.co.uk writer Yvette finds her label something of a burden.

    So perhaps it’s unsurprising that people who own their own two bed semis in the suburbs and work in middle management cling to the title of working class because their grandfather was a brick layer and their dad didn’t go to uni.

    How do we define middle class?

    ‘A social group that consists of well-educated people, such as doctors, lawyers, and teachers, who have good jobs and are not poor, but are not very rich.’
    Working class means: ‘a social group that consists of people who earn little money, often being paid only for the hours or days that they work, and who usually do physical work.’

    The thing is, playing at being working class is the hallmark of privilege.

    I had an intensely privileged upbringing for which I am incredibly grateful. I reached adulthood having never worried about money or considered that I’d have to go without.

    Like lots of middle class kids, when I got a Saturday job it was to save for an iPod, not to contribute to the family outgoings or cover the cost of my own school uniform.

    If I wanted to go on a school trip there was no question of asking if we could afford it, just an assumption that a cheque would be written. My childhood was lined with a kind of safe, warm feeling that can only come from financial security.

    I will admit that it is annoying when people take the piss out of my accent or assume I’ve never known a moment’s hardship because of my background. But it’s also a very small price to pay for knowing that you’ll always have a home to return to and someone to lend you money if things get really desperate.

    It is churlish in the extreme to enjoy all the comforts of a middle class upbringing and then start appropriating working class culture because while you liked getting a new iPhone every Christmas as a kid, these days you’d like to come across as edgy and being from a nice village in Surrey just doesn’t fit your image.

    Working class culture might be a lot cooler, but life is (for the most part) harder.

    Assuming that we are conflating ‘working class’ with ‘low income’, which is a generally accepted wisdom, then being working class comes with some very real disadvantages.

    For many working class kids, it means inherited financial stress. Life expectancy is lower for people in lower income brackets. There are thousands of beautifully written personal essays about the experience of growing up poor. That’s a steep price to pay for a less embarrassing accent.

    That’s why middle class people who adopt a mockney accent and pretend to be from council estates when they grew up in affluent areas get such a hard time. Because they’re taking the bits that they like from working class culture without having to experience any of the parts that are hard. That’s not right or fair.

    If you’ve had the comfortable childhood and the educational advantages of being middle class then sharing a background with Chris Martin and Jeremy Clarkson is a small price to pay.

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    mourning-someone-you-dont-know-2e1emourning-someone-you-dont-know-2e1erebeccacnreidmourning-someone-you-dont-know-2e1emourning-someone-you-dont-know-2e1erebeccacnreid

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    (Picture: Asda)

    Animal print has made a huge and insistent comeback over the last year.

    A night out now feels like you’re on safari, with every other person plastered from head-to-toe in leopard, tiger, cheetah or zebra.

    We can’t get enough of it – we want to look like animals of the savanna. At work, in the club, on a date – there’s literally no situation where animal print isn’t appropriate.

    Asda have cottoned on to our current obsession and have launched a rather fierce-looking leopard print cake – and we can’t get enough of it.

    We didn’t know we needed animal print food as well, but, turns out, we do.

    Not only does it look great, it also sounds like it tastes pretty amazing.

    A chocolate sponge, covered in chocolate flavoured icing, decorated with a fondant collar and edible decorations – and at just £12 you don’t even have to wait until it’s your birthday.

    It is genuinely the trend that won’t quit.

    From the must-have, Instagram-worthy leopard print skirt, or the fleeting trend of leopard print hair – we’re just not quite sure how far this trend could go.

    Will we be dressing like wild animals for the rest of time? It’s a real possibility.

    In the meantime, we can certainly enjoy a slice of leopard print cake safe in the knowledge that our choice of baked goods is right on trend.

    MORE: Woman wants free KFC after getting the logo tattooed on her lip

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    Asda are selling a leopard print cake and it matches all our clothesAsda are selling a leopard print cake and it matches all our clothesnataliemorris88Asda are selling a leopard print cake and it matches all our clothesAsda are selling a leopard print cake and it matches all our clothesnataliemorris88

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Men who are exposed to high levels of pollution are more likely to have problems with erectile dysfunction, a new study has found.

    In a study on rats, scientists found that exposure to the fumes caused decreased blood flow to the the genitals.

    They used 40 rats in the experiment – a control group of 10, who had clean non-polluted air, then three groups of 10 each exposed to vehicle fumes for two hours, four hours and six hours daily for three months.

    They found that the rats who were exposed to the fumes for four hours and six hours had ‘significant reduction of erectile function’.

    (Picture: Ella BYworth for Metro.co.uk)

    As well as affecting the genitals, the study found that their lung capacity was decreased, meaning exposure to pollution might make you breathless as well.

    The study said: ‘For the first time, our study revealed the deleterious effect of VE (vehicle exhaust) on penile erection

    ‘Our results raise concerns about the potential role played by long-term exposure to gasoline VE in the development of erectile dysfunction.’

    The results, published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, show for humans, living on a busy road and being exposed to pollution on a regular basis could cause some issues.

    MORE: Being middle class isn’t cool, but it’s a massive privilege

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    (Picture: Kingsley Healthcare)

    Residents at a care home have been treated to the best kind of therapy – a visit from some alpacas.

    Hadleigh Nursing Home, in Ipswich, Suffolk found residents recently benefited from the therapeutic qualities of alpacas.

    Alpaca therapy can help to give residents a feeling of trust in the animal and love for that individual – something dementia suffers may find hard to accept from a human being.

    This care home was selected last year for a pet therapy trial by Clay Hill Farm in Wattisham, Suffolk, which keeps a herd of 60 alpacas.

    AL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementia Caption: Jacqueline Simpson
    (Picture: Kingsley Healthcare)

    The farm’s owner, Jo Bridge, now brings a South American breed of the animal for regular visits.

    She says all their visits have ‘proved so rewarding for everyone’.

    Jo adds: ‘You can see the pleasure the alpacas bring just by the big smiles on residents’ faces.’

    AL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementia Caption: Violet Shipman greets an alpaca
    (Picture: Kingsley Healthcare)

    Clair Perks, the home’s activities co-ordinator, said: ‘It really lifts the mood of people living with dementia.’

    She says the alpaca visit had an amazing response – especially from one resident in particular.

    Clair says Alfred White is not normally very expressive, but he ‘sat bolt upright when he encountered one of the alpacas for the first time and said, ‘darling, you have made my evening.’

    Aww.

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    AL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementiaAL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementiahattiegladwellmetroAL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementia Caption: Jacqueline SimpsonAL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementia Caption: Violet Shipman greets an alpacaAL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementiaAL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementiahattiegladwellmetroAL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementia Caption: Jacqueline SimpsonAL-PACA WITH LOVE - Alpacas given special role caring for those suffering from dementia Caption: Violet Shipman greets an alpaca

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    (Picture: Boden)

    Children’s things are awash with gender stereotypes. And it usually begins at their gender reveal – pink for girls, blue for boys.

    Many a brand have found themselves on the wrong side of the discussion, attributing strong, masculine properties to boys and soft, homely qualities to girls.

    The latest company to find itself in hot water is Boden, a clothing retailer, which shared contrasting gendered messages as part of its catalogue.

    In the Mini Boden catalogue it showed a boy posing with a bike next to the words: ‘Boys start every adventure with a bike (or a pair of very fast legs).’

    While a girl wearing a dress stood next to words that said: ‘Girls, new clothes are in sight fill your pockets (and wardrobes) with flowers and race this way.’

    The idea that boys like to do outdoorsy, adventurous things whereas girls only care about clothes is obviously an outdated one, as pointed out by many parents who complained about the retailer.

    And now the company has apologised.

    The catalogue came to light when Dad-of-two Sam Williams tweeted Boden asking them to rethink their ‘damaging’ marketing.

    ‘How we design and market children’s clothes, play, TV, and everything else can have a huge influence on how children perceive themselves and their aspirations in life,’ he wrote.

    ‘Children need to be allowed to grow, explore and form their own identities, to be comfortable with who they are.

    ‘Dividing things up as either for boys or girls is very limiting, and sometimes damaging. There are boys who want to stuff their pockets with flowers, and girls who want to go on adventures, they shouldn’t be made to feel wrong or strange.’

    Hundreds of parents shared Sam’s outrage, posting pictures of their children breaking the gender mould.

    Many also called the brand sexist for its limited views. Since then, Boden has said sorry for the message and that it will rethink its tactics.

    ‘We’re so sorry for blotting our copybook in such style,’ the brand commented on Twitter. ‘Whilst it wasn’t our intention to ever stereotype the roles of boys and girls, we probably over-egged things a little here.

    ‘We really appreciate you bringing this to our attention, and will ensure that such a mishap doesn’t happen again. Please accept our sincere apologies. And we will ask Don Draper to stop writing our copy.’

    Can all other children’s brand take note of this situation to avoid it in future?

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    Boden clothing sexist againBoden clothing sexist againfaimabakar1Boden clothing sexist againBoden clothing sexist againfaimabakar1

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    Martyn Shilson and his girlfriend Andrea Riano who got engaged thanks to a message written in the snow. See SWNS story SWCApropose; A romantic boyfriend proposed to his winter-loving girlfriend by writing "marry me?" in the snow during the first flurry of the year. Martyn Shilson, 28, planned to surprise his girlfriend Andrea Riano, 25, after she expressed her love for snow to him. And when the first rush of snow hit Britain last week, Martyn thought there was no better time to pop the big question. Andrea, from Cambridge says she was overjoyed with the surprise after Martyn, from Bournemouth travelled to her especially for this.
    (Picture: Andrea Herazo / SWNS)

    A romantic boyfriend proposed to his girlfriend by writing ‘marry me?’ in the snow.

    29-year-old Martyn Shilson planned to surprise his girlfriend Andrea Riano, 25, after she expressed her love for snow to him.

    When the first rush of snow hit Britain last week, Martyn thought there was no better time to pop the big question.

    Andrea, from Cambridge says she was overjoyed with the surprise after Martyn, from Bournemouth, travelled to her especially for the proposal.

    She said: ‘It’s like what you see in the movies. I think it was a very improvised idea from Martyn.

    ‘He was meant to be meeting me outside my flat that night so we could play in the snow.

    ‘I love snow, I go crazy in the snow.

    ‘I was just playing around making snow angels and then I turned around and saw that he’d written ‘marry me?’ in the snow. It was perfect.’

    Martyn Shilson and his girlfriend Andrea Riano who got engaged thanks to this message written in the snow. See SWNS story SWCApropose; A romantic boyfriend proposed to his winter-loving girlfriend by writing "marry me?" in the snow during the first flurry of the year. Martyn Shilson, 28, planned to surprise his girlfriend Andrea Riano, 25, after she expressed her love for snow to him. And when the first rush of snow hit Britain last week, Martyn thought there was no better time to pop the big question. Andrea, from Cambridge says she was overjoyed with the surprise after Martyn, from Bournemouth travelled to her especially for this.
    (Picture: Andrea Herazo / SWNS)

    Andrea turned around to write a big ‘YES’ in the snow.

    She had no idea Martyn was going to propose – and was ‘so happy’ when he did.

    The couple, who met last August through a friend, are planning a June wedding, when Andrea’s Colombian family will fly over to Britain.

    Andrea, who has a masters in biomedical science, added: ‘It’s unreal you just wake up and think ‘I’m getting married’.

    ‘I had to get used to it – I had such a feeling of joy inside.

    ‘We’re planning to have the wedding in June so that all of our friends from around the world can come during the summer holidays.

    ‘We want to get married on the beach in Bournemouth because that’s where Martyn’s nanna’s ashes have been spread so it means a lot to him.’

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    SNOW-POSAL - Romantic boyfriend proposes to snow-loving girlfriend during first flurry of the yearSNOW-POSAL - Romantic boyfriend proposes to snow-loving girlfriend during first flurry of the yearhattiegladwellmetroMartyn Shilson and his girlfriend Andrea Riano who got engaged thanks to a message written in the snow. See SWNS story SWCApropose; A romantic boyfriend proposed to his winter-loving girlfriend by writing SNOW-POSAL - Romantic boyfriend proposes to snow-loving girlfriend during first flurry of the yearSNOW-POSAL - Romantic boyfriend proposes to snow-loving girlfriend during first flurry of the yearhattiegladwellmetroMartyn Shilson and his girlfriend Andrea Riano who got engaged thanks to a message written in the snow. See SWNS story SWCApropose; A romantic boyfriend proposed to his winter-loving girlfriend by writing "marry me?" in the snow during the first flurry of the year. Martyn Shilson, 28, planned to surprise his girlfriend Andrea Riano, 25, after she expressed her love for snow to him. And when the first rush of snow hit Britain last week, Martyn thought there was no better time to pop the big question. Andrea, from Cambridge says she was overjoyed with the surprise after Martyn, from Bournemouth travelled to her especially for this.Martyn Shilson and his girlfriend Andrea Riano who got engaged thanks to this message written in the snow. See SWNS story SWCApropose; A romantic boyfriend proposed to his winter-loving girlfriend by writing "marry me?" in the snow during the first flurry of the year. Martyn Shilson, 28, planned to surprise his girlfriend Andrea Riano, 25, after she expressed her love for snow to him. And when the first rush of snow hit Britain last week, Martyn thought there was no better time to pop the big question. Andrea, from Cambridge says she was overjoyed with the surprise after Martyn, from Bournemouth travelled to her especially for this.

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    Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.
    Eve, 18 (Picture: Rankin)

    We’re probably all guilty of tweaking our photos to show our best selves, whether it’s taking 34 selfies to get the perfect shot or applying the most flattering filter.

    But the rise of apps designed specifically for easily editing pictures of yourself normalises taking those tweaks to another level.

    Apps such as FaceTune let you slim your nose, blur out spots, and make your eyes look bigger.

    With those options available, and with so many people taking them up, what’s happening to our sense of self? How is this affecting how we think we should look?

    Rankin’s new project, Selfie Harm, explores this.

    Rankin photographed 14 teenagers, then handed them the images to edit and filter until they felt the picture was ‘social media ready’.

    Not one girl left her photo unedited.

    Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.
    Mahalia, 19 (Picture: Rankin)
    Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.
    Benedicte, 16 (Picture: Rankin)

    Instead the teenagers slimmed their jawlines, made their noses smaller, and brightened their skin.

    ‘People are mimicking their idols,’ says Rankin, ‘and all for social media likes.

    ‘It’s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It’s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people’s self-image.’

    The photo series forms part of a new project called Visual Diet, which sees M&C Saatchi, Rankin and MTArt Agency team up to explore how the images we consume are affecting our mental health.

    Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.
    (Picture: Rankin)
    Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.
    (Picture: Rankin)

    The website reads: ‘In the age of the influencer, we’re increasingly force-fed thousands of images every day.

    ‘Hyper-retouched, sexually gratuitous bite-sized images are served up fast and fleeting. They often leave us feeling hollow and inadequate.

    ‘These are the empty calories. The visual calories we gorge on because they’re there. Our appetite for this type of content is insatiable. It is visual sugar and we are addicted.

    ‘Consuming too much of this content seriously harms your mental health.’

    Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.
    Emma, 16 (Picture: Rankin)
    Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.
    (Picture: Rankin)

    What can we do about all this?

    Well, neither Selfie Harm nor Visual Diet has revealed the secret cure just yet.

    You can start by unfollowing people and brands who make you feel rubbish. Those of us who do edit our photos could make that clear in the captions. We could ban apps that allow (and encourage) the average selfie-taker to alter their image.

    There’s no quick, easy fix to create a culture of self-love and acceptance. But this photo series shows that we have to keep taking the steps to make it happen.

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    Rankin selfie harmRankin selfie harmellencscottRankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harmRankin selfie harmellencscottRankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.Rankin selfie harm rankin archive For my latest series, Selfie Harm ???? I photographed 14 teenagers & handed them the image to then edit & filter until they felt the image was ???social media ready???. People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes. It???s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia. It???s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people???s self-image. Thanks to: the incredible individuals that took part in the @Visual.Diet project; Jennifer, Felix, Alessandra, Maisie, Isaac, Seb, Beneditcte, Shereen, Mahalia, Eve, Siena, Tomas, Emma & Georgia. Also, @mimigray_ at @mcsaatchilondon, @marinetanguyart, @gemfletcher, @technicallyron & @justintindall on making this project come to life ???? PLEASE NOTE ???? The majority of subjects preferred their original image.

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    ‘There is nothing more dehumanising than knowing you are capable of being independent but your environment disabling you’ (Picture: Getty)

    Getting on the property ladder is a challenge for many millennials.

    But if – like me – you have a disability, finding money for a deposit to put on a property is the least of your concerns.

    The latest English Housing Survey shows that just seven per cent of homes meet basic accessibility features.

    Out of the 13.9 million disabled people in the UK,1.8 million have an accessible housing need – 580,000 of whom are of working age.

    Like any young adult, I too dreamt of leaving my family home and starting my own life independently.

    I’d always come face to face with barriers growing up as I was born with a condition Osteogenesis Impefecta (brittle bones) and, as a full-time wheelchair user, had to navigate the world differently to my able-bodied peers on a daily basis.

    Nevertheless, my family and friends were there to help me overcome these obstacles.

    If I couldn’t reach the kitchen cooker, my mum would make my dinner or help me in and out of the inaccessible shower. My sister would reach my clothes out of the cupboard and my friends would lift me and my wheelchair down those few steps at the front door.

    I had a good life, but I wasn’t independent.

    Out of the 13.9 million disabled people in the UK,1.8 million have an accessible housing need – 580,000 of whom are of working age.

    Having others do almost everything for you may sound idyllic to some, but actually I felt like I was in my own version of a prison at times, having to wait for others to help me do basic daily tasks.

    For me there was nothing more dehumanising than knowing you are capable of being independent but your environment disabling you.

    For many disabled people the impact of not having access to an adapted home can be devastating. For example, disabled people living in inaccessible homes are four times more likely to be unemployed.

    They can also become isolated from society. These circumstances can have a detrimental effect on their mental health. They did for me.

    This exclusion exceeds the four walls of our own homes.

    If 93 per cent of homes in England do not even meet basis access standards, this means at best a disabled person, myself included, has a seven per cent chance of attending a house party or event where they can access a downstairs bathroom or simply enter the property if no lift was available.

    Feeling part of society is vital for anyone, yet many disabled people are continuously excluded.

    I am one of the lucky ones. As of last summer moved into a bespoke adapted apartment provided by housing association Habinteg, one of the few providers that recognise the needs of disabled people and offer places to live that meet their needs.

    The benefits of having my own space where I can be as independent as possible have been enormous.

    I can host for my friends and family, cook and have dinner parties. I can have my nieces over for the weekend, feel like a daughter, sister, aunty and friend, instead of the person everyone needs to care for and worries about, because they recognise how inaccessible a world I live in.

    Not only has having my own adapted home benefitted me, it has also impacted greatly on my loved ones.

    My mother used to suffer with chronic back pain from lifting me in and out of the shower.

    She didn’t work so she could be my full-time caregiver.

    Now she has her own life, she’s back working as a nurse and more importantly she can sleep with peace of mind knowing that I am in a property where I am safe and, more importantly, happy.

    I recognise that I am in a very privileged position by having my own adapted home, not only because of my disability but because of the current housing climate, yet on occasions I have a sinking feeling in my stomach, a feeling of being trapped.

    What if my career as an actor meant I had to move, or my partner was no longer happy in London anymore?

    I couldn’t just simply up sticks due to the sheer lack of accessible properties, and the fact that many private residents don’t allow necessary adaptations because it is often seen as ‘devaluing’ the property.

    With the charity Shelter highlighting the need for 3.1 million more social homes to accommodate the rapidly rising UK population, which includes an ageing population who have access needs and an increasing disabled community, we seriously need to re-evaluate how we are building our homes of the future.

    As a society, we can find a way that benefits us all. All we ask for is freedom of choice, to live independently and equally.

    Most of all, we want to live the best life we can, this really isn’t a selfish request.

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    Red and green doors on a brick facadeRed and green doors on a brick facadecharleyross92Red and green doors on a brick facadeRed and green doors on a brick facadecharleyross92

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    Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kid. On Saturday, Kevin Armentrout, a public speaker in Las Vegas, wrote a Facebook post about a traveler named Joseph Wright, a field sales manager at Samsung in Oklahoma, who took joy in entertaining his 16-month-old daughter, Carter Jean, at the airport.
    (Picture: Kevin Armentrout)

    Travelling with kids is hard. It’s difficult to keep them entertained for hours in a different environment with lots of people around.

    One dad had a much easier time, thanks to a kind stranger.

    Kevin Armentrout posted on Facebook about waiting to board a plane with his daughter.

    His 16-month-old daughter Carter Jean is inquisitive and loves to say ‘hi’ to everyone she meets.

    But when she walked up to this man, he not only responded but he asked if she wanted to sit with him.

    He took out his tablet and showed her how to draw, then they watched cartoons together.

    Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kid. On Saturday, Kevin Armentrout, a public speaker in Las Vegas, wrote a Facebook post about a traveler named Joseph Wright, a field sales manager at Samsung in Oklahoma, who took joy in entertaining his 16-month-old daughter, Carter Jean, at the airport.
    (Picture: Kevin Armentrout)

    Carter Jean offered him some of her snacks in return, while they sat together for 45 minutes.

    Kevin added: ‘Watching them in that moment, I couldn’t help but think, different genders, different races, different generations, and the best of friends. This is the world I want for her.

    ‘In a country that is continuously fed that it’s so deeply divided by beliefs, I want her life to be filled with moments like this… not liberal or conservative republican or democrat, socialist or capitalist, just HUMAN.’

    All Kevin knew was that the man was called Joseph and he was a field sales manager with Samsung in Oklahoma.

    At the end of the post he wrote: ‘Joseph from @samsungus in Oklahoma, if this should happen to find you. Thank you for showing my daughter what kindness and compassion looks like. Continue to shine your light in the world.’

    Amazingly, with the help of family and friends, Kevin managed to track down the man and discovered his name is Joseph Wright.

    His friends commented on the post to explain what a special man he is.

    One said: ‘Joseph Pat Wright has always been a kind and loving soul. I am not in the least bit surprised that he was so generous with his time and attention. And I know he never thought twice about race, gender, generation, or politics.’

    ‘I first met Joseph Pat Wright in school in 1976…this is exactly how he was then and throughout our years in school…beautiful human being then and now,’ another added.

    ‘As a friend and former colleague of Joseph’s, I can tell you he is indeed a great man and he is awesome with kids of all ages!’ a friend said.

    We need more people like Joseph.

    MORE: Man proposes to girlfriend by writing ‘marry me?’ in the snow

    MORE: Royal Caribbean wants to pay someone £100,000 to travel the world


    Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kidDad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kidlauraabernethy6Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kid. On Saturday, Kevin Armentrout, a public speaker in Las Vegas, wrote a Facebook post about a traveler named Joseph Wright, a field sales manager at Samsung in Oklahoma, who took joy in entertaining his 16-month-old daughter, Carter Jean, at the airport.Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kid. On Saturday, Kevin Armentrout, a public speaker in Las Vegas, wrote a Facebook post about a traveler named Joseph Wright, a field sales manager at Samsung in Oklahoma, who took joy in entertaining his 16-month-old daughter, Carter Jean, at the airport.Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kidDad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kidlauraabernethy6Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kid. On Saturday, Kevin Armentrout, a public speaker in Las Vegas, wrote a Facebook post about a traveler named Joseph Wright, a field sales manager at Samsung in Oklahoma, who took joy in entertaining his 16-month-old daughter, Carter Jean, at the airport.Dad's Facebook post thanking kind stranger for entertaining his kid. On Saturday, Kevin Armentrout, a public speaker in Las Vegas, wrote a Facebook post about a traveler named Joseph Wright, a field sales manager at Samsung in Oklahoma, who took joy in entertaining his 16-month-old daughter, Carter Jean, at the airport.

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    Hannah shares a three-bedroom flat in Brockley with two people she met online
    Hannah shares a three-bedroom flat in Brockley with two people she met online (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Fancy living in London?

    Hope you’re okay with paying a load of money, sharing with a lot of people, and taking a couple of trains each morning to get to work.

    Renting in London can be… tricky. That’s putting it lightly.

    Rents are high, space is limited, and if you’re lucky enough to find a place that’s affordable, you’ll have to accept that you’re not allowed to make it feel like home in any way – no painting, no pets, no pictures on the wall (unless you’re good with blu-tack).

    Through What I Rent, we explore the reality of renting in London, good bits and bad.

    This week we’re hanging out with blogger Hannah Louise, who shares a three-bedroom house in Brockley with two housemates.

    Bedroom with en-suite bathroom of a three-bedroome flat in Brockley, London,
    She pays £620 a month (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Hi, Hannah! How much do you pay to live here?

    My room and en suite is £620 pcm, my two housemates pay £575 each.

    All in, bills are about £230 per month split three ways, then we pay the water bill quarterly.

    What’s the house like?

    Three bedrooms, an open plan kitchen/living room, one main bathroom, and one en suite.

    How long have you lived here?

    A little over 18 months. I found it through the south east London house share Facebook group.

    I didn’t know my housemates beforehand, but we’re all girls of similar ages and get on with each other.

    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Plenty of plants make the house feel more like home (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Are you happy with the area?

    Yeah, really happy – I love my room and the area is great. We’re on two overground lines so it’s easy enough to get around, and there are loads of nice pubs, bars and cafes in Brockley.

    Do you feel like you have enough space?

    My room is a good size but I have a lot of stuff and work from home, so ideally I’d like an additional office/storage room too.

    How have you made the house feel like home?

    I think our house had quite a homely ‘vibe’ before we even moved in because of the fireplaces and wooden features, so adding plants, cushions, prints and things like that made it feel like home.

    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    Are there any issues with the house that you’re putting up with? 

    Nothing really, we’re very fortunate to have a good landlord who has replaced the oven and the fridge when they have broken during our time here.

    Any plans to move again?

    I would like to have my own place at some point but I definitely don’t have plans to do that in the near future.

    And… what about buying?

    Buying isn’t really something that is on my radar while I’m still single and living in London.

    Shall we have a look around Hannah’s place?

    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY Tenant Hannah Farrington is pictured in the living room of her three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    The house has a main living room combined with the kitchen area (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the living room of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Fireplaces make the house feel extra cosy (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the combined living room and kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Hannah says there are no issues with the house, and they’re lucky to have a nice landlord (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the combined living room and kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    The kitchen is a bit snug, but they make do (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the hallway of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Up we go (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the main bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Here’s the main bathroom (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the main toilet of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    With a good supply of toilet paper (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of toothbrushes in the main bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Yep, five toothbrushes (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY Tenant Hannah Farrington is pictured in her bedroom with en-suite bathroom of her three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Here’s Hannah’s room, complete with neon light (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Spot the beret (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    There’s a fireplace in here, too (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    And a *lot* of plants (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    We’re big fans of the posters (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Hannah has an en suite bathroom (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    That’s handy, as she has quite the supply of beauty stuff (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of toothbrushes in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    Here’s that toothbrush shot you were after (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)
    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland
    And, yes, some more plants (Picture: Susannah Ireland/Metro.co.uk)

    What I Rent is a weekly series that’s out every Tuesday at 10am. Check back next week to have a nose around another rented property in London.

    How to get involved in What I Rent

    What I Rent is Metro.co.uk's weekly series that takes you inside the places in London people are renting, to give us all a better sense of what's normal and how much we should be paying.

    If you fancy taking part, please email whatirent@metro.co.uk.

    You'll need to have pictures taken of your kitchen, living room, bathroom, and bedroom, plus a few photos of you in your room. Make sure you get permission for your housemates!

    You'll also need to be okay with sharing how much you're paying for rent, as that's pretty important.

     


    What I Rent: BrockleyWhat I Rent: BrockleyellencscottHannah shares a three-bedroom flat in Brockley with two people she met onlineBedroom with en-suite bathroom of a three-bedroome flat in Brockley, London,LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY Tenant Hannah Farrington is pictured in the living room of her three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the living room of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the combined living room and kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the combined living room and kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the hallway of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the main bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the main toilet of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of toothbrushes in the main bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY Tenant Hannah Farrington is pictured in her bedroom with en-suite bathroom of her three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of toothbrushes in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandWhat I Rent: BrockleyWhat I Rent: BrockleyellencscottHannah shares a three-bedroom flat in Brockley with two people she met onlineBedroom with en-suite bathroom of a three-bedroome flat in Brockley, London,LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY Tenant Hannah Farrington is pictured in the living room of her three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the living room of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the combined living room and kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the combined living room and kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the kitchen of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the hallway of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the main bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the main toilet of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of toothbrushes in the main bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY Tenant Hannah Farrington is pictured in her bedroom with en-suite bathroom of her three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the bedroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of toothbrushes in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah IrelandLONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, JANUARY 29TH 2019. WHAT I RENT: BROCKLEY General view of details in the en-suite bathroom of tenant Hannah Farrington's three-bedroomed flat in Brockley, London, 29th January 2019. Hannah pays ?620 a month, while her flatmates Rhiannon and Fran pay ?575 a month. Photo credit: Susannah Ireland

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