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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

older | 1 | .... | 1628 | 1629 | (Page 1630) | 1631 | 1632 | .... | 1849 | newer

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    Thai man has liposuction to get the perfect six pack
    (Picture: ViralPress)

    Pangpaparn Ounvilai, from Thailand, always struggled with his weight.

    The 24-year-old went to the doctor with his concerns, and was recommended liposuction.

    Liposuction – a fat removal procedure – is usually carried out on overweight men and women to lose weight but now a different kind of treatment is being used to form six packs.

    The procedure has been taking off in Australia and Thailand which has attracted many tourists flying to the country for the surgery.

    Surgical expert Atittayapa Photiya showed pictures of his client Pangpaparn after having plastic surgery at the Masterpiece cosmetic hospital in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Pangpaparn, who has now had the surgery, is now enjoying life with his new abs.

    He can now go to the beach and show off his pecs.

    NEWS COPY - WITH PICTURES A Thai man has revealed the extreme lengths he went to in order to get the perfect six pack. Pangpaparn Ounvilai, 24, went to doctors complaining about his chubby tummy and they recommended the bizarre procedure. Surgical expert Atittayapa Photiya showed pictures of the male client after having abs plastic surgery at the Masterpiece cosmetic hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. The procedure involves liposuction to remove fat from specific parts of the stomach, which later reveals the natural abdominal lines. There is no plastic or silicone included in the surgery. Pictures published on Wednesday (24/04) shows the male body during and after the abdominal surgery. His abdomen is covered with bandages and wounds from the surgical cuts where the fat was removed. Pangpaparn said that he decided to spend 3,000 GBP for the six-pack surgery to perfect his body because exercise could not give him the kind of body he wants. The client, who previously had done several surgeries before, said: ???I have been working out for many years but I want to my abs line to be more defined, so I did the surgery.??? ???It will make my body always look good even though I will gain a little fat. I am happy this way.??? Six pack surgery has been increasing in popularity for the last four years in Thailand, which also attracts many tourists flying to the country for the surgery. In 2018, a similar clinic also promoted by Pangpaparn Ounvilai caused controversy when it unveiled a penis whitening procedure for image conscious Thai men. ENDS
    The procedure involves liposuction to remove fat from specific parts of the stomach which is pressed on the stomach to reveal the natural abdominal lines (Picture: ViralPress)

    The procedure involves liposuction to remove fat from specific parts of the stomach, which is pressed to the stomach to later reveal the natural abdominal lines.

    There is no plastic or silicone included in the treatment.

    Those who decide to get the six-pack liposuction will need to maintain a healthy lifestyle after they’ve had the surgery.

    Pangpaparn said that he decided to spend £3,000 for the six-pack surgery to perfect his body because exercise could not make him look how he wanted.

    Pangpaparn being prepared for the surgery
    Pangpaparn being prepared for the surgery (Picture: ViralPress)
    The procedure selectively removes small deposits of fat surrounding specific muscle groups, which is what enhances the natural muscle contour
    The procedure selectively removes small deposits of fat surrounding specific muscle groups, which is what enhances the natural muscle contour (Picture: ViralPress)

    He had pictures taken to show his body during and after the abdominal surgery.

    In some of the images, you can see Pangpaparn’s abdomen covered with bandages and wounds from the surgical cuts where the fat was removed.

    Pangpaparn after the surgery
    (Picture: ViralPress)

    The client said: ‘I have been working out for many years but I want to my abs line to be more defined, so I did the surgery.

    ‘It will make my body always look good even though I will gain a little fat. I am happy this way.’

    Pangpaparn after the surgery
    (Picture: ViralPress)

    Six pack surgery has been increasing in popularity for the last four years in Thailand where tourists come to have other types of cosmetic surgeries performed.

    In 2018, a similar clinic also promoted by Pangpaparn Ounvilai caused controversy when it unveiled a penis whitening procedure for body-conscious Thai men.

    Pangpaparn with a six pack after completely healing
    (Picture: ViralPress)

    MORE: Fat donated by liposuction patients is being turned into body soap

    MORE: Surgeon posted needles to woman for DIY liposuction at home

    MORE: Plastic surgery report reveals the latest trends in body enhancement


    Lipo six packLipo six pack

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    Two dogs enjoy each others company at a restuarant. A study of 2,000 dog owners has found that they have each met an average of four people while taking their dog for a walk or attending puppy training classes. See SWNS story SWBRdogs. Having a dog is good for your social life ??? as almost half of owners have made friends while on their ???walkies???. A study of 2,000 dog owners found they have met an average of four new people though their pet while out for walks or at puppy training classes. Similarly, this has led to the dogs themselves having a vast social life too, with 60 per cent of owners believing their pet has ???dog friends???. In fact, the average pooch is considered to have three friends, with more than one quarter even having a ???walking buddy???, often going out with the same canine and owner. And eight in 10 believe it is ???important??? for dogs to have friends, which they regularly see.
    (Picture: Nic Serpell-Rand/SWNS.COM)

    Having a dog is really good for your social life.

    Almost half of dog owners have made friends while on their walks with their pups, suggests a new study.

    Research involving 2,000 dog owners found they have met an average of four new people through their pet while out for walks or at puppy training classes.

    This has led to the dogs themselves having a vast social life too, with 60% of owners believing their pet has ‘dog friends’.

    The average dog is considered to have three friends, with more than one quarter even having a ‘walking buddy’, often going out with the same canine and owner.

    And eight in 10 believe it is ‘important’ for dogs to have friends that they regularly see.

    As well as canines, three in 10 dogs also have other animal companions, the majority of which are cats.

    But some respondents said their pet is friends with a horse and rabbit.

    The study was commissioned by children’s TV Channel, Boomerang, to launch its new show Mighty Mike on 1 May.

    Nick Jones, MA Dog Behaviourist said: ‘Dogs that mix nicely together can form strong bonds and learn a variety of social skills from each other that humans may find hard to spot or recognise.

    A pug waits for one of its 'dog friends' to turm up for dinner. A study of 2,000 dog owners has found that they have each met an average of four people while taking their dog for a walk or attending puppy training classes. See SWNS story SWBRdogs. Having a dog is good for your social life ??? as almost half of owners have made friends while on their ???walkies???. A study of 2,000 dog owners found they have met an average of four new people though their pet while out for walks or at puppy training classes. Similarly, this has led to the dogs themselves having a vast social life too, with 60 per cent of owners believing their pet has ???dog friends???. In fact, the average pooch is considered to have three friends, with more than one quarter even having a ???walking buddy???, often going out with the same canine and owner. And eight in 10 believe it is ???important??? for dogs to have friends, which they regularly see.
    (Picture: Nic Serpell-Rand/SWNS.COM)

    ‘Similarly, dogs are the perfect ice breaker to start conversations with people you might otherwise pass by and are proven to bring numerous health benefits along the way, such as improvements in mental and physical health, which this research has also shown.’

    The study also found 54% of dog owners believe having their pet has boosted their confidence as they can easily talk to strangers.

    Other areas of their lives which have been improved include stress levels, health and time spent outdoors.

    A further four in 10 even said their overall happiness has been enhanced and one third admitted to arranging ‘play dates’ for themselves and their pooch.

    Love lives have even been positively affected, as one six knows someone who has met their other half through having a dog.

    Further to this, one quarter of pups are ‘friends’ with a fellow dog in their house.

    When dogs recognise four legged friends they regularly see, 60% act excited and over one quarter become energised, showing how much they enjoy the company.

    Common places for dogs to meet others were found to be in the local area, with 63% often bumping into the same animals when they are out and about.

    And one in 10 have interacted with fellow pooches while on holiday at the beach and in walking groups.

    On average, owners spend more than seven-and-a-half hours a week outside walking their pup, while one in 10 even spend up to 10 hours.

    But more than one third admitted they prefer going on a walk with another companion and, on average, spend one hour a week on arranged outings with fellow dog walkers.

    Emphasising the social impact having a dog has, three quarters of those polled via OnePoll believe in the lovable phrase ‘dogs are a man’s best friend’.

    MORE: Artist creates incredible felt replicas of people’s dead dogs

    MORE: It’s National Puppy Day, so here are nine fantastic dogs who need a new home


    SEI_64796194SEI_64796194

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    FILE: Shoppers use electronic self checkout tills inside a J Sainsbury Plc supermarket in Redhill, U.K., on Tuesday, March 27, 2018. U.K. grocer J Sainsbury Plc plans to buy Walmart Inc.s Asda in a 7.3 billion-pound ($10 billion) deal that would transform the countrys supermarket industry and leave the U.S. retailer as the combined companys biggest shareholder. Our editors select the best archive images of the two supermarket chains. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
    (Picture: Bloomberg via Getty Images)

    Sainsbury’s has launched the UK’s first till-free grocery store, where customers can pay on an app and leave without going to the checkout.

    Wave goodbye to infuriating queues, all you’ll have to do is grab what you need, pay for it on your phone – and you’re done.

    At the branch in central London, shoppers need to scan their items using the supermarket’s Smartshop app, bag them up and pay for them using Google Pay or Apple Pay. It couldn’t be simpler.

    The local convenience outlet at Holborn Circus has been refurbished for the three-month trial, and the checkout area and the bank of tills at the front of the shop have been removed.

    You can still pay by card and cash, but you will have to use a helpdesk manned by a single member of staff – so it’s probably not the best idea.

    But this system doesn’t work for everything. The downside is that beer, wine, spirits and cigarettes have been removed from the shop, as they all require time-consuming age verification by a member of staff.

    METOR GRAB - Sainsbury's launches first ever till-free supermarket Sainsbury?s Holborn Circus Local store has been refurbished to be mobile-first and check-out free From Sainsburys https://www.about.sainsburys.co.uk/news/latest-news/2019/first-till-free-grocery-story-29042019
    (Picture: Sainsbury’s)

    Other supermarkets, including Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, the Co-op and Tesco have launched or trialled apps that allow shoppers to pay via a mobile phone – but Sainsbury’s is the first to remove traditional checkouts.

    ‘We know our customers value their time and many want to shop as quickly as possible – technology is key to that,’ said Clodagh Moriarty, Sainsbury’s Group Chief Digital Officer.

    ‘This is an experiment rather than a new format for us – it hasn’t been done in the UK before and we’re really excited to understand how our customers respond to the app experience.

    ‘We’ll be with our customers and colleagues all the way over the coming months, iterating continuously based on their feedback before we decide if, how and where we make this experience more widely available.’

    MORE: Having a dog helps you make friends, study finds

    MORE: We urgently need to address the future of earnings as more work is automated

    MORE: Kitten smaller than a toothbrush is found under an L.A home with her umbilical cord still attached


    File: Sainsbury Buys Asda In 7 Billion-Pound DealFile: Sainsbury Buys Asda In 7 Billion-Pound Deal

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    Disabled toilet door
    Using an accessible bathroom when you don’t need to can be very damaging to those within the disabled community (Photo: Getty)

    It’s an age-old question: Should you ever use an accessible bathroom if you don’t have a disability?

    I’ve lost track of the amount of people who have admitted to me that they – in fact – have. Even my close friends and family members.

    I am usually met with a ‘sorry, not sorry’, a guilty look and some slight embarrassment by the fact they have just admitted this to someone in a wheelchair.

    They’ve not seen the harm in it, the queue for the non-accessible stall was just so long and they assure me that they were quick!

    They usually continue justifying their decision by saying something along the lines of, ‘I took a good look around and didn’t see anyone like you,’ i.e. wheelchair user.

    But the truth is, using an accessible bathroom when you don’t need to can be very damaging to those within the disabled community.

    The first faux pas people often make is assuming that only wheelchair users use accessible bathrooms.

    The reality is that out of the 13.9 million people in the UK living with an impairment, less than eight per cent are wheelchair users.

    Many impairments are invisible, and those who have conditions such as Crohn’s, colitis or have multiple sclerosis – to name a few – benefit greatly from being able to use accessible bathrooms.

    And lest we forget those who are autistic, or have Asperger’s Syndrome.

    People with these conditions can find using public bathrooms greatly overwhelming, whereas an accessible bathroom filters out the noise and is much more user-friendly.

    Over 50 per cent of those who suffer from Crohn’s or colitis have been subjected to discrimination for using an accessible toilet, according to Andy McGuiness, campaigners manager at Crohn’s & Colitis UK.

    Changes have been made. In 2017, many facilities across the UK rolled out new bathroom signs to replace the iconic ‘wheelchair’ symbol with a universal ‘Not Every Disability is Visible’ and changed the signage from ‘disabled toilet’ to an ‘accessible toilet’.

    There is no law against using an accessible toilet, and nothing stating that only people with impairments get first dibs.

    However, the simple fact that disabled toilets have been renamed as accessible toilets re-enforces the argument that those with impairments – visible or invisible – really should be the only people using them.

    You may or may not have noticed that accessible bathrooms look different to non-accessible ones.

    Granted, the plumbing works just the same but there are added features to make life a little easier, and most importantly safer, for those who need it.

    Let’s start with handrails. I can often tell when someone who most likely hasn’t got an impairment has used the accessible loo, as the handrails are often pushed up out of the way.

    The simple fact that disabled toilets have been renamed to accessible toilets re-enforces the argument that those with impairments – visible or invisible – really should be the only people using them.

    They really are a nuisance right?

    Well, for many it is a vital piece of equipment for safely transferring and supporting yourself whilst sitting on the toilet.

    When I’m travelling independently, I rely on this adaptation to safely get myself on and off the toilet, and if it is pushed up I often struggle to lower it back down.

    Without it, I lose my independence and put myself in tremendous danger. I’ve once slipped off a toilet without a bar and fractured my skull and broken my collarbone.

    Even sinks are strategically placed very close to the toilet so that you can wash your hands before retiring to your wheelchair or mobility scooter, without transferring nasty toilet germs.

    I’ve visited many bathrooms where the emergency cord and toilet paper have been moved out of reach. These may seem like minor details but can have a huge impact.

    If you are still in the mindset that a toilet is simply a toilet and don’t really see what all the fuss is about, then I would like to direct you to campaign groups like Changing Places, who tirelessly fight for the freedom of simply being able to leave their home and have access bathroom facilities.

    These projects are fighting for families to be able to plan a day trip or weekend away, safe in the knowledge that there will be the correct facilities to support them.

    This would put an end to being changed in the back of the car or a dirty toilet floor.

    So what is the solution? When discussing this issue with those who don’t have impairments, they have suggested to have some sort of identification or ‘proof of disability’.

    The whole notion of some sort of disability marker sits very uncomfortable with me. It has some eerie parallels to Nazi Germany, making those who didn’t fit into society stand out by wearing triangles and stars.

    A person’s impairment is very personal, and to be expected to divulge that to strangers just so you can use the bathroom is outright absurd.

    You wouldn’t ask any other minority group to disclose their sexual orientation or religious belief for accessing day-to day-amenities.

    While I would never reprimand someone for using an accessible bathroom if they had a bathroom emergency from eating bad sushi, or a child who has had an accident, and I doubt anyone from the disabled community would either, it is worth thinking twice before you use one.

    Next time you head towards an accessible bathroom, stop and think how you would feel if someone compromised your independence simply for their own convenience. Or worse, their own laziness.

    MORE: Dear Greta Thunberg, thank you for proving how powerful girls can be

    MORE: It's not the tube's priority seats that need the makeover, it's our attitudes

    MORE: Sorry celebs, but criticism is an essential part of whatever you do


    Disabled sign on toilet door, close-upDisabled sign on toilet door, close-up

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    black tap freakshake
    (Picture: Instagram/blacktap)

    Disneyland is home to a lot of tasty treats.

    Vegan dishes, lightsaber churros, boozy ice cream floats – you could head to Florida just for the food.

    Now, after many months of waiting, Disneyland is also home to Black Tap milkshakes.

    In case you’re not clued up on your important milkshake history, a quick explanation. Black Tap is a restaurant based in New York that’s pretty much responsible for making freakshakes – those milkshakes topped with all manner of additional sugar-packed delights – a thing.

    Years back, Black Tap started selling milkshakes that towered high with cookies, doughnuts, and even wedges of cake. They were an instant hit, especially on Instagram, and soon the burger chain became the go-to spot for influencers fancying some dairy.

    Then in 2017, it was announced that Black Tap would be opening a branch in the Downtown Disney District of the Disneyland Resort, customised just for Disney customers.

    Now, finally, that’s become reality.

    black tap milkshakes at disneyland
    (Picture: blacktap)

    This week Black Tap’s Disneyland location opened its doors to eager customers (they really were eager, as reports say there were queues of 100 people waiting to get in by the time the branch opened at 11am).

    The new branch features Black Tap’s signature shakes – called CrazyShakes – being sold from a to-go shake window. Guests can take their pick from the Bam Bam Shake, the Brooklyn Blackout, the Cookie Shake, the Cookies N Cream Supreme, and the Strawberry shortcake, as well as drink-in only options, including the Cake Shake, and classic shake flavours.

    The shakes on offer:

    Bam Bam Shake: Vanilla frosted rim with fruity pebbles topped with a fruity pebbles rice krispy treat, strawberry pop tart, laffy taffy, whipped cream & a cherry

    Brooklyn Blackout: A chocolate shake with a frosted rim of mini chocolate chips topped with a chocolate brownie, whipped cream & chocolate drizzle

    The Cookie Shake: Vanilla shake with frosted rim of cookie crumbles, topped with a ‘cookiewich’, crumbled cookies, chocolate chips, whipped cream, and a chocolate drizzle.

    Cookies N Cream Supreme: Vanilla frosted rim with crushed oreos topped with a ‘cookies ’n cream’ sandwich, crumbled oreo, whipped cream & chocolate drizzle

    The Cake Shake: A cake batter flavoured shake with a vanilla frosted rim, rainbow sprinkles, whipped cream, and a cherry – topped with a full-on slice of funfetti cake.

    The burger joint will also, of course, be selling burgers – all the classic options plus a nice vegan version – as well as salads, wings, sandwiches and other proper meals for when you don’t want to exist on sugar and dairy alone.

    If you’re heading to Disneyland, it’s worth making a visit to the Black Tap restaurant and settling in for a burger and a shake. Just prepare to be so full you don’t want to move for hours afterwards.

    If you’re not going to see Mickey and his pals, expect to see a load of towering shakes on Instagram. You just know all the influencers will be holding their shakes in front of the Sleeping Beauty Castle.

    MORE: McDonald’s Germany is launching a new vegan burger

    MORE: Asda launches £2 donut burgers that are perfect for bagels


    black tap disneyland-4151black tap disneyland-4151

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    METRO GRAB FACEBOOK Landlord puts room up for rent with house rules scribbled on the wall - and 'shift work' tenants are expected to take turns sleeping in one bed One Australian landlord has listed a room for rent on social media Kmart Unhacks & Roasts Page Liked ?? 20 hrs ?? #BusinessBrenda goes above and beyond when advertising her rooms for rent. For convenience the house rules are written on the walls. Literally. ???? *This was sent to us by a Brenda fan. x https://www.facebook.com/cleanyourdamnhouseBrenda/photos/a.356323744881043/639506369896111/?type=3&theater
    (Picture: Facebook/Kmart Unhacks & Roasts)

    We all know renting is a nightmare and that some landlords treat their tenants terribly, all in the name of making a quick buck.

    But one Australian landlord has taken things a few steps too far with a truly outrageous advertisement – we have never seen anything like it.

    The room, which was listed for rent on social media, costs $123 – it’s unclear if that is per day or per week – and has the ‘house rules’ scribbled all over the walls – so there’s no danger of tenants stepping out of line.

    The tiny space is offered for two renters. But there’s a catch – there’s only one single bed. How is that supposed to work?

    The landlord says that the space is perfect for shift workers, who will be able to take turns sleeping in the bed depending on their working hours.

    We have heard of hot-desking, but hot-bedding? It’s a hard no from us.

    ‘Rooms to rent. Available. Two night time workers, two day time workers. Message for more details, ideal shift workers,’ the ad said.

    METRO GRAB FACEBOOK Landlord puts room up for rent with house rules scribbled on the wall - and 'shift work' tenants are expected to take turns sleeping in one bed One Australian landlord has listed a room for rent on social media Kmart Unhacks & Roasts Page Liked ?? 20 hrs ?? #BusinessBrenda goes above and beyond when advertising her rooms for rent. For convenience the house rules are written on the walls. Literally. ???? *This was sent to us by a Brenda fan. x https://www.facebook.com/cleanyourdamnhouseBrenda/photos/a.356323744881043/639506369896111/?type=3&theater
    (Picture: Facebook/Kmart Unhacks & Roasts)

    ‘If you no someone looking let em no we have this available [sic].’

    Images of the ad popped up on Kmart Unhacks & Roasts Facebook group and plenty of people were quick to criticise the ‘filthy’ conditions, as well as he ludicrous sleeping situation.

    And the rules that are scrawled across the wall are oddly specific.

    ‘Turn lights off when not using the room… keep cupboard doors closed…’

    ‘It’s pretty sad that for a lot of people, this would be all they could afford. A shared bed in a s*** hole,’ commented one woman.

    ‘Ugh. It’s a wonder she doesn’t want to fit an afternoon shift worker in there as well. Make sure that bed’s not having any empty time,’ added another.

    No matter how desperate we get when it comes to the rental market, sharing a single bed with another housemate is pretty much where we have to draw the line.

    MORE: By using the disabled toilet you’re putting me at risk

    MORE: Black Tap’s massive freakshakes finally arrive at Disneyland

    MORE: Sainsbury’s launches first ever till-free supermarket


    Room with shared bedRoom with shared bed

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    Nicholas lives with his girlfriend, Nat, in a one-bedroom flat in Stratford
    Nicholas lives with his girlfriend, Nat, in a one-bedroom flat in Stratford (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)

    Moving in with someone you’re dating is a big deal.

    Sure, you’ll save on rent and can finally walk around in your underwear, but you can also quickly get sick of each other and get torn apart by London’s harsh rental market.

    When it goes badly, it goes very badly.

    But if you’re lucky, you can find a lovely place to live with the person you love, and become one of those smug London couples with a bathtub and a nearby Tube station.

    In this week’s What I Rent, we’re hanging out with one of those couples who’s nailed the renting thing.

    Nicholas shares a one-bedroom flat in Stratford with his girlfriend. After having some not so great experiences of houseshares, he’s finally found his happy place.

    They pay £725 a month each
    They pay £725 a month each (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)

    Hey, Nicholas! How much are you paying for this place?

    £1,450 that my girlfriend and I split down the middle, so £725 each. Bills are around £180 a month between us.

    Do you have a good deal?

    For the quality of the flat and the amenities the building offers, we definitely can’t complain. I was renting a double room for £750 prior to moving here, with the bills slightly lower than here, so essentially breaking even, but now we get our own place!

    What do you get for what you’re paying?

    One Bedroom, one kitchen/living room, one bathroom, and ‘the stuff cupboard’, where our suitcases, boxes, extra clothes etc. live beside the boiler and washing machine.

    How did you find the flat? 

    We moved in one year ago. We shared a double room for the summer of 2017 and looked into potential places we could rent whenever my girlfriend inevitably moved to London for a grad job.

    This building really stood out to us, so a year later when a flat was available we jumped at the chance.

    The couple moved in together earlier than planned after a couple of rubbish houseshares
    The couple moved in together earlier than planned after a couple of rubbish houseshares (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)

    Do you like the area?

    We’re on the west side of Stratford, right by the Olympic park. Westfield is 10 minutes’ walk away so we can get anything we need basically on our doorstep.

    We’re really close to Stratford station, so we can get anywhere in the city fairly quickly.

    Being next to the Olympic park means when the sun comes out we’re only five minutes away from sunbathing in the grass. They also let me park my motorcycle for free in their underground garage (the block across the road wanted £110 a month for a space).

    And are you happy with the flat?

    We honestly love the flat, as we have a decent amount of living space and the view is incredible.

    The rooms themselves are a pretty decent size, the only thing we think we’re missing is maybe more wardrobe space, but there isn’t really an obvious place for one to fit!

    A watch and jewellery on a tray
    They’re happy they did (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)

    What’s it like living with your girlfriend?

    I lived in two different house-shares before moving here and found it kind of exhausting. I think I had reasonably bad luck with flatmates, as they were either a bit mad or basically absent 100% of the time.

    We had planned to move in a little later, as we’d only been together about a year and a half, but when I was in India for work my then housemate messaged me saying he no longer wanted to extend our house contract…which was due to expire whilst I was away. So, we took a chance and decided to get a flat together and it couldn’t have worked out better

    How have you made the flat feel like home?

    We’ve got lots of little things around that are meaningful to us, such as the box of tickets for things we’ve been to together, the porcelain duck from my girlfriend’s grandmother (with accompanying party hat) and the letterboard where I attempt to be witty. Also, the rug, it really ties the room together.

    The word 'slut' on a black background, as part of the artwork in the house
    They’ve packed the flat with bits and bobs to make it feel more like home (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)

    Are there any major issues with the house you have to put up with?

    It gets very hot in the summer, I think the record is 32 degrees. We need to bite the bullet and get a mini air conditioner.

    What would you be looking for if you were to move again?

    We’d like a spare room for guests, office space, and storage when we can afford it. We’ll most likely grab a flat in this building with a second bedroom.

    Have you considered buying a place?

    We’ve actually both just opened LISAs with a view towards buying a house in about 4 years’ time. We’re looking to have kids (and a dog) in the future, so somewhere with outdoor space in a quieter area is the dream!

    the living room of nicholas and natalie's flat
    There’s plenty of space for two (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    a letterboard that reads: If you're looking for a sign... this isn't it
    There’s that letterboard Nicholas mentioned (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    the dining area
    The living room leads straight into the kitchen and dining area (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    a peace lily sits in front of the TV
    A peace lily adds some life to the TV corner (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    ladder shelves filled with trinkets
    We like the ladder shelves (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    a model duck sits on the shelf, along with lego decorations
    Hey there, party duck (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    a trophy and cards featuring winnie the pooh and minnie mouse
    Someone’s trophy-worthy (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    The kitchen (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    three gin bottles sit on the kitchen counter next to a wine rack
    Can you tell this couple likes gin? (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    a line of wine corks
    …and wine? (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    Out of the kitchen, let’s go to the bedroom (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    The bedroom
    The bedroom (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    dry shampoo, air freshener, and perfume sits on a counter
    (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    the view from the window looks out at Stratford
    The couple love the view (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    photos framed on the wall
    (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    the bathroom
    Finally, the bathroom (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    there's a bathtub
    Yes, there’s a tub (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)
    toothbrushes, sponges, and cotton rounds
    Spot the toothbrushes (Picture: Alison Jenkins/Metro.co.uk)

    What I Rent is a weekly series that’s out every Tuesday at 10am. Check back next week to have a nose around another rented property in London.

    How to get involved in What I Rent

    What I Rent is Metro.co.uk's weekly series that takes you inside the places in London people are renting, to give us all a better sense of what's normal and how much we should be paying.

    If you fancy taking part, please email whatirent@metro.co.uk.

    You'll need to have pictures taken of your kitchen, living room, bathroom, and bedroom, plus a few photos of you in your room. Make sure you get permission for your housemates!

    You'll also need to be okay with sharing how much you're paying for rent, as that's pretty important.

    MORE: What I Rent: Jess, £625 a month to share a one-bedroom flat in Deptford

    MORE: What I Rent: Abbie, £520 a month for a room in a three-bedroom flat in Manor House

    MORE: What I Rent: Harriet and Hannah, £850 each a month to share a three-bedroom flat in St Paul’s


    SEI_63411603SEI_63411603

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    Gender stereotyping in early childhood
    Stereotypes are imposed upon us before we are born and then continue and multiply throughout our lives (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    If I say the words professor, scientist or pilot to you, what, or rather, who do you think of? If you tell me it’s a working mum of three I’ll say, ‘yeah, right’.

    Go on, admit it, you see a man for each one. How about midwife, childcare worker or secretary – well obviously they are women, how could they be anything else?

    What if a dad wants to take some time off to care for his children, or just leave work early to pick them up, is that being a ‘real man’ or does he feel a bit awkward about asking his boss?

    Or if a woman reports that she has been raped do the police treat her as a victim and investigate the crime or do they ask for her mobile phone so they can check up on her relationship history? The underlying attitude is that she has done something wrong. It must be her fault.

    At the heart of all of these examples, and much more, are our highly gendered attitudes determining what we perceive to be normal.

    These stereotypes are imposed upon us before we are born and then continue and multiply throughout our lives.  Evidence shows that parents, unwittingly, promote and transmit these stereotypes, creating difference where there is none.

    Schools then add their share, giving boys more classroom attention or praising girls for being pretty or kind rather than rewarding them for being competitive or recognising them as clever.

    Stereotypes contribute to girls’ perceptions of themselves, their expectation to take second place, play a supporting role, put others first; their struggle to see subjects such as maths, physics or economics as being for them because they aren’t perceived to be ‘feminine’.

    Those segregated shopping aisles or websites divided by ‘for girls’ ‘for boys’ labels are designed to drive us to buy more products.  But I think parents and children actually want something better.

    It’s why girls then grow up to be women who think their appearance matters more than their intellect or capability. Why we think older men are sexy and older women are well, just past it. All of this lasts a lifetime.

    It’s why women hold back from leadership roles, or even applying for jobs when amply qualified, while men will readily apply if they can do 60 per cent of the role.

    And I’m sorry can I just say… it’s why women often begin a sentence with an apology.

    But it also affects boys – 59 per cent of people say it’s harder for a boy to be ‘feminine’ than it is for a girl to be a ‘tomboy’. Boys struggle with communicating their emotions, or managing their anger.

    It leads to a toxic masculine culture where anything less than macho is deemed to be abnormal. Why dads are inhibited from caring for their children.  This of course, has a negative impact on women’s lives too.

    But the prevailing norm is that gender stereotypes are good for business.

    A new poll released today shows that six in 10 parents say product marketing reinforce stereotypes about what boys and girls can do.

    Those segregated shopping aisles or websites divided by ‘for girls’ ‘for boys’ labels are designed to drive us to buy more products.  But I think parents and children actually want something better.

    Our society and our economy certainly needs change. This is why my charity, the Fawcett Society, has today launched a new Commission on Gender Stereotypes in Early Childhood.

    Over the next year we will be collecting evidence and bringing experts from the worlds of parenting, education, neuroscience, government and retail together to examine the evidence on the impact of gender stereotypes not only in childhood, but throughout our lives, and what we can do to change it.

    The problem is endemic, but evidence shows that we can change it.  Interventions in the classroom or to support parents to challenge stereotypes can change perceptions and change children’s lives.

    But we need to confront the scale of the challenge and drive lasting attitudinal change. Or we will continue to pay the high price of the gender pay gap; growing self-harm among teenagers and violence against women and girls.

    MORE: Avengers’ Zoe Saldana raising three sons in ‘gender neutral environment’

    MORE: Why this non-binary activist is fighting for more gender options on passports

    MORE: As a transgender captain in the US army, I worry for my future in the forces


    Why we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to helpWhy we should care about children?s mental wellbeing - and what we can do to help

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    Aldi and Lidl cut price bank holiday prosecco
    (Pictures: Aldi and Lidl)

    It seems to be war of the fizz in UK supermarkets at the moment, as stores fight it out to boast the cheapest bottle of Prosecco.

    With a Bank Holiday coming up soon, it makes sense that they want to get you through their doors to stock up on treats. Iceland won out last time around, but it looks like we have some new contenders for top spot.

    That’s why Aldi and Lidl have both dropped the price of their Prosecco to a miniscule £3.99.

    Aldi’s Castellore Prosecco Frizzante and Lidl’s Allini Prosecco Treviso Frizzante usually cost £5.49, but have been reduced by £1.50 a pop.

    The Frizzante style in both the drinks gives a gentler fizz than a lot of Proseccos, which makes it perfect for sipping with light bites like seafood.

    Aldi’s version apparently has notes of lemons, limes, grapefruit, peach and a touch of melon, while Lidl’s ‘expresses a lovely freshness and fruitiness’.

    The deals are only available in stores, and as with any good deal, you’ll likely have to be quick to make the most of them.

    You can locate your nearest Aldi store here, or check the Lidl store locator here.

    Both of the discount chains are also offering a range of special buys this week that include garden furniture and outdoor goods, so if the weather’s nice you can enjoy your fizz in beautiful al fresco surroundings.

    If you don’t have and Aldi or Lidl near you, Tesco have their Bella Cucina Prosecco Frizzante on sale for £5.75 and Asda have an Extra Dry Prosecco for £6.

    MORE: Gender stereotypes pushed on you by your parents will last a lifetime

    MORE: By using the disabled toilet you’re putting me at risk


    FIZZ-TASTIC Aldi and Lidl slash Prosecco prices to just ?4 a bottle Aldi and Lidl slash Prosecco prices to just ?4 a bottle - but are Tesco and Asda cheaper? PROSECCO fans are in luck because both Aldi and Lidl have slashed the price of the sparkling favourite in a bid to have the cheapest bubbly on the market. Aldi?s Castellore Prosecco Fizzante and Lidil?s Allini Prosecco Treviso Fizzante usually cost ?5.49 for a 75cl bottle.FIZZ-TASTIC Aldi and Lidl slash Prosecco prices to just ?4 a bottle Aldi and Lidl slash Prosecco prices to just ?4 a bottle - but are Tesco and Asda cheaper? PROSECCO fans are in luck because both Aldi and Lidl have slashed the price of the sparkling favourite in a bid to have the cheapest bubbly on the market. Aldi?s Castellore Prosecco Fizzante and Lidil?s Allini Prosecco Treviso Fizzante usually cost ?5.49 for a 75cl bottle.

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    Yassmin Abdel-Magied, author of You Must Be Layla
    (Picture: Yassmin Abdel-Magied)

    Yassmin Abdel-Magied, a mechanical engineer turned writer, has written her first work of fiction, You Must Be Layla.

    The book tells the story of a young inventor growing up in Australia and navigating life as a Muslim in a new school.

    The Sudanese writer uses her real-life experiences of engineering and steering through white dominated spaces as a Muslim woman.

    Like the fictional character of Layla, Yassmin has a great love of invention. She always wanted to get her hands dirty and worked on Australia’s oil rigs for four years, often as one of the few women but also as the only Muslim.

    Layla embodies snippets of her life story but possesses the bravery and adventures Yassmin wishes she had.

    Some of those adventures include being an active explorer as a youth, standing up to her bullies, fighting back, and even creating a robot out of gummy bears.

    In the story, Layla’s Muslimness is part of her, not her entire identity or the entire story – something Yassmin argues is important in telling Muslim stories.

    Yassmin Abdel-Magied, author of You Must Be Layla
    (Picture: Yassmin Abdel-Magied)

    ‘I wrote this particular book firstly because representation is not a challenge that’s going to go away any time soon,’ Yassmin tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘Yes, we’re seeing a lot more books now that centre Muslim woman but there’s still few and far in between, so I wanted to contribute to that cannon.

    ‘I also wanted to tell a story about a Sudanese kid whose Muslimness was not the focus because the books I read that had Muslim characters were about being Muslim.

    ‘But growing up it wasn’t something I thought about all the time. You don’t go around thinking “I’ve got clothes on”, it’s just a thing that you have.

    ‘And so I wanted to share that experience for the external audience of normalising it and for Muslim audiences to reflect the experience of a young adult personality and one that isn’t perfect and is full of flaws.

    ‘We’re not perfect, we’re not getting it right all the time and it’s so important to be allowed to fail, fumble, and find themselves.’

    Yassmin Abdel-Magied, author of You Must Be Layla
    (Picture: Yassmin Abdel-Magied)

    Yassmin wanted to use fiction to work through some of the issues in her life, such as Islamaphobia.

    ‘In a way, Layla’s character was sorting through things I was trying to sort through myself,’ she adds.

    ‘There are essences of me in Layla but this story itself is definitely hers. I realised that I was using fiction to process the trauma of an Islamaphobic society. This is why we need those stories.’

    Yassmin Abdel-Magied, author of You Must Be Layla
    (Picture: Yassmin Abdel-Magied)

    Yassmin’s had a busy life, at 28, she’s already worked as an engineer, written non-fiction, been an actress and a TV presenter.

    Engineering was her first love, despite the limitations that came with it.

    ‘Initially, I tried to ignore my gender or minimise it in a male-dominated industry,’ says Yassmin. ‘I guess I internalised misogyny and patriarchy and this idea that being a woman was lesser in this gender binary.

    ‘And that manifested in trying to deny my femininity and never mentioning the fact that I’m a woman or that I was different. I was trying to act like one of the boys and so it was something my colleagues forgot or ignored, especially the older ones.

    ‘But ultimately I am a woman, I look like one and present like one.

    ‘Over time, as I started to understand things better, I started to realise that no matter how much I tried to pretend I wasn’t a woman or that I wasn’t different, the reality was that I was and I needed to find ways to own that and be proud of it.’

    You Must Be Layla is now available to buy online and in-store.

    MORE: My Label and Me: I’m Muslim and you will not erase my humanity

    MORE: Muslim woman poses like a badass in front of anti-Islam protesters

    MORE: Defining a Muslim woman by whether she covers up is toxic


    Sudanese writer explores the experience of being the only Muslim woman working in Australia's oil rigsSudanese writer explores the experience of being the only Muslim woman working in Australia's oil rigs

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    Crocs x Beams fanny pack shoes
    (Picture: BEAMS)

    They’re the shoe of choice for many a chef and nurse, but tend to get a lot of hate on social media.

    Crocs, while famed for being comfortable and durable, don’t really win out in the style stakes, and it’s about to get worse.

    In a collaboration with Beams, the shoe brand are going to be offering their ‘iconic’ style with an added fanny-pack.

    Alongside the Japanese brand, Crocs have introduced a line that includes two colourways (teal shoes and purple packs or vice versa).

    The zip-up bags attach to either the back portion of the shoe, or can be stuck on to the front if you’re extra confident.

    Crocs x Beams fanny pack shoes
    (Picture: BEAMS)
    Crocs x Beams fanny pack shoes
    (Picture: BEAMS)

    Each side shows the brand name of each of the designers, and could probably fit a small packet of chewing gum and a lip balm. They cost $53 a pair (£40.80).

    The rest of the range has Crocs with sun visors, fringing, and plenty of gems. These are definitely the most controversial, however.

    One social media user joked ‘the fanny pack is for all the extra condoms you won’t be using’ while another quipped that the bags were ‘so you have a place to store your virginity’.

    It’s not the first time Crocs have veered into a new lane, with their collaboration with Balenciaga featuring a platform sole (and a £600 price tag).

    We also reported on some edgelord ‘goth Crocs’ recently, sporting some rather dangerous looking spikes and even a classic metal chain to show the world you’re practical yet punk.

    If you’re brave enough, you can get yours on the Beams site now.

    MORE: Aldi and Lidl have slashed Prosecco prices to give you change from a fiver

    MORE: Black Tap’s massive freakshakes finally arrive at Disneyland


    Crocs unleash even more horror on the world with their fanny-pack shoesCrocs unleash even more horror on the world with their fanny-pack shoes

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    HALIMA ADEN GRACES THE PAGES OF SPORTS ILLUSTRATED SWIMSUIT IN A BURKINI
    (Picture: Yu Tsai/SI Swimsuit)

    Somali-American model Halima Aden, who was born into a Kenyan refugee camp, returned to the country to do a high fashion photoshoot.

    The 21-year-old has now become the first Muslim woman to pose in a burkini for swimwear magazine Sports Illustrated (SI).

    The feature, photographed by American photographer Yu Tsai, was shot in Kenya where Halima lived until she was seven years old.

    The young model, from Minnesota, is pictured in the issue wearing custom-made burkinis – a modest swimsuit.

    ‘I keep thinking back to six-year-old me who, in this same country, was in a refugee camp,’ Halima said during her shoot.

    ‘So to grow up to live the American dream and to come back to Kenya and shoot for Sports Illustrated in the most beautiful parts of Kenya – I don’t think that’s a story that anybody could make up.’

    HALIMA ADEN GRACES THE PAGES OF SPORTS ILLUSTRATED SWIMSUIT IN A BURKINI
    (Picture: Yu Tsai/SI Swimsuit)

    The theme for this year’s Sports Illustrated photoshoot is ‘shattering perceptions’, as they want to diversify the modelling industry and improve visibility for underrepresented demographics of women.

    For Halima, the move was to make swimwear accessible to Muslim women.

    ‘Young Muslim women need to know that there is a modest swimsuit option available to them so they can join the swim team, participate in swim class at school, and go with their friends to the beach,’ she said.

    Halima Aden attends UOMA Beauty Launch Event at NeueHouse Hollywood
    (Picture: Yu Tsai/SI Swimsuit)

    ‘Muslim girls should feel confident taking that step and doing so comfortably while wearing a burkini.

    ‘SI Swimsuit has been at the forefront of changing the narrative and conversation on social issues and preconceived notions.

    ‘I’m hoping this specific feature will open doors up for my Somali community, Muslim community, refugee community and any other community that can relate to being different, she added.

    ‘This feature is proving that a fully covered hijab wearing model can confidently stand alongside a beautiful woman in a revealing bikini and together they can celebrate one another, cheer each other on, and champion each other’s successes.’

    MJ Day, editor of SI Swimsuit. echoed the message: ‘Having Halima as a part of SI Swimsuit is yet another example of the range and scope of the type of beauty that exists.

    ‘Her participation and inclusion further highlight the brand’s commitment and belief in supporting women to own who they are and what makes them unique and ultimately reaffirms what our messaging has been, that you are worthy.’

    MORE: ‘Be fiercely you’: Halima Aden says it’s a great time to be a Muslim woman at International Somali Awards

    MORE: Halima Aden turns fashion designer as she launches 27 new headscarves

    MORE: Muslim woman poses like a badass in front of anti-Islam protesters


    SI HALIMA ADENSI HALIMA ADEN

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    An illustration of a woman looking at a laptop
    (Picture: Ella Byworth)

    An online local services marketplace has launched a ‘troll slaying’ service for people who would like some extra support on social media.

    The service was launched after an increasing concern about how online ‘trolls’ are affecting the mental health of social media users.

    So, members of the public can either pay to have someone defend them online, or get paid to help defend others who are receiving online abuse.

    The service has been launched on Bark.com to help reduce the amount of negativity online and support those who are being targeted.

    People who sign up to the service to help defend others will be known as ‘troll slayers’, and they can be hired by anyone who finds themselves the target of online abuse, or who is worried about being targeted on social media.

    The service has been launched in response to statistics which show that trolling and cyberbullying affects more than two-fifths of young people, and nearly three-quarters of respondents think social media sites don’t do enough to safeguard their users.

    an illustration of a man holding hands with a mobile phone
    (Picture: Picture: Liberty Antonia Sadler /Metro.co.uk)

    Members of the public who are looking to hire a troll slayer can speak to their online confidant about particular issues close to their heart and how they wish to be defended.

    The estimated price for the service is £15 an hour based on similar services, but much like with all services on Bark.com the provider will set the price.

    Troll slayers will set up instant communication with their clients so they can be alerted when they have been targeted online.

    Of course, not just anyone can be a troll slayer. You have to have some experience with social media, and be willing to give it your all.

    To sign up as a troll slayer, you should be a regular user of social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, and be able to navigate popular blogging platforms like WordPress.

    It’s also important to note that you won’t be able to use any abusive language or troll anyone yourselves.

    Kai Feller, Bark.com co-founder, said: ‘It’s never good to see someone targeted online for their views. In society today, there is a huge expectation to be on social media, despite the fact that we know it isn’t always the friendliest of places.

    ‘We’re hoping that our service providers can restore a bit of balance online and make social media a place for constructive comment and debate again.’

    MORE: Gender stereotypes pushed on you by your parents will last a lifetime

    MORE: Aldi and Lidl have slashed Prosecco prices to give you change from a fiver


    Paedo hunterPaedo hunter

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    Why you shouldn't be scared to ask someone to stop eating something that will kill you
    Life is hard enough for allergy sufferers, don’t throw extra charges in the mix. (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    For allergy sufferers eating out can be a minefield.

    Trying that new place on the corner can be like stepping into a new world.

    Will they be understanding or, like my home village’s Chinese takeaway, just ignore your requests? (With an extra sprinkling of sesame seeds for good measure.)

    The challenge of eating out with allergies is well-trodden for people like me by adulthood and, in recent years, some relief has come from allergy menus and more awareness.

    But one example that has shocked and angered me is the news that some restaurants are now defaulting to asking people with severe allergies to bring their own food or sign a waiver.

    On Twitter, Hannah De Ville posted the response she received from popular restaurant and bar Pianoworks in London, when she was organising her brother Thomas’s birthday meal.

    Having been informed of Thomas’s severe nut allergy Pianoworks replied saying he could bring his own food but they would charge £16.50 to heat it up.

    This extortionate corkage fee is just £5 cheaper than what they charge for two courses on their dinner menu (Monday to Wednesday).

    Thomas DeVille nut allergy, Piano Works West End
    Thomas de Ville, and his girlfriend (Picture: Thomas de Ville)

    The other option was for Thomas to eat from the kitchen but sign a waiver, acknowledging there could be cross contamination.

    Without sounding like a comedian from 2001, this is honestly health and safety gone mad.

    Pianoworks is not alone in their approach either – sources in the event industry told me this is becoming commonplace.

    Accommodation and hospitality has been replaced with a house party attitude of bring your own Tupperware (BYOT).

    The waiver highlights a growing and troubling attitude to allergies, a one size fits all approach that is harmful, exclusive and similar to the ‘may contain’ label warnings being applied across most food products.

    The legal and ethical implications are also worrying – when allergy sufferers are signing these waivers, what exactly are they agreeing to?

    If I do eat and have a severe reaction, it is not your fault? Am I saying it is okay to take no care when preparing my food? Will my family be able to mention your company at my funeral?

    Would you eat meat at a restaurant if they couldn’t guarantee it was cooked? Imagine the outrage at then being asked to sign a document, just in case that meat is raw.

    In a reply on Twitter, Pianoworks compared their policy to EasyJet’s recent ban of all nut products saying they were not willing to ‘abandon the use of nuts’.

    This strange response portrays an attitude I have faced on countless flights where fellow passengers suddenly feel victimised for not being able to eat a specific snack for two hours.

    It’s why there needs to be an all-out ban at 20,000 feet in the air to stop someone dying, but the allergy community aren’t asking restaurants to abandon anything. Instead we are asking for food we are paying for to be prepared with care and to not lead to an allergic reaction.

    Good examples of restaurants dealing with allergies are Wagamama and Bill’s who will ask arriving customers if they have any.

    Why you shouldn't be scared to ask someone to stop eating something that will kill you
    (Don’t ban allergy sufferers from eating, ban life-threatening allergens from the food they order. Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    I can actually eat out with friends at these places and feel safe and all restaurants should follow suit. The answer is not to default to banning allergy sufferers instead of the things they are allergic to.

    I’m not expecting a binder on arrival from every place I go to eat in but at the very least have the serving staff ask me before I have to tell them about my allergies.

    I recently went to a family meal at a small Lebanese place in Watford, called Tarboush. Not holding any expectations of them being able to accommodate my allergies, I was just going to pick at the pitta and drink my wine, but they prepared all my food separately and made the effort to recommend certain dishes they could recook without my no-go ingredients.

    This shows that no matter the size, most kitchens have the tools and expertise to be able to create safe food.

    And companies need to understand that ‘safe food’ is different from 100% guaranteed nut-free – which all allergy sufferers understand.

    We take a risk just by allowing someone to cook our food for us, so don’t shrug off all responsibility by not serving food to allergy sufferers or introducing things like waivers and extortionate corkage.

    Like everyone, when we eat out we want to enjoy ourselves and know we’re safe, and we don’t want to have to eat out of a lunch box or sign our life away to do so.

    MORE: Restaurant makes customers sign allergy disclaimers before eating there

    MORE: Parents’ desperate plea to Just Eat over allergy death of daughter, 15


    Why you shouldn't be scared to ask someone to stop eating something that will kill youWhy you shouldn't be scared to ask someone to stop eating something that will kill you

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    COPY BY TOM BEDFORD Pictured: Sion Thomas with the message he painted to one of his cows to propose to his fiancee Re: A farmer has proposed to his fianc?eby painting the big question on the side of one of his cows. Sion Thomas proposed to Alice Green by painting ?Alice: marry me?? in green paint on the side of a white dairy shorthorn cow. The couple, both 24, live at Drysgol Goch farm, Llanfyrnach, and met during their final year while they were both studying in Harper Adams University. Sion and Alice plan to marry in September 2020, and have been surprised by the number of messages on social media they have received since Sion shared his proposal.
    (Picture: Athena Picture Agency Ltd)

    Take your flash mobs and rings in champagne glasses and get out, please.

    No proposal is worth it unless it involves a cow. That is what we have decided today.

    We haven’t plucked this rule out of thin air – a man has set the bar for us by proposing to his girlfriend with a lovely white shorthorn.

    Sion Thomas, 24, is a farmer, which definitely helped him with easy cow access. When he decided to pop the question to his girlfriend, Alice Green, he wanted to surprise her with something special. Naturally, his prize white shorthorn cow was the only option.

    Sion painted a blue heart (using washable paint) and the words ‘Alice Marry Me?’ on to the side of the magnificent beast, which Sion then rode past the window of the farmhouse kitchen.

    Alice was baking in the kitchen, looked up, spotted the cow, and burst into (happy) tears. She said yes. Alice, not the cow.

    COPY BY TOM BEDFORD Pictured: Sion Thomas with fiancee Alice Green Re: A farmer has proposed to his fianc?eby painting the big question on the side of one of his cows. Sion Thomas proposed to Alice Green by painting ?Alice: marry me?? in green paint on the side of a white dairy shorthorn cow. The couple, both 24, live at Drysgol Goch farm, Llanfyrnach, and met during their final year while they were both studying in Harper Adams University. Sion and Alice plan to marry in September 2020, and have been surprised by the number of messages on social media they have received since Sion shared his proposal.
    (Picture: Athena Picture Agency Ltd

    Sion said: ‘I wanted a memorable way to propose – it was worth it to see the look on Alice’s face.

    ‘She was baking in the kitchen at the time, it gave her a real shock.’

    ‘I bought the engagement ring and only my mum and dad were in on the surprise.

    ‘But we’ve had lots of good luck messages from friends who heard about my proposal.’

    The couple, from Llanfrynach, Pembrokeshire, plan to marry next year.

    MORE: Extremely large donkey Derrick could become a world record holder

    MORE: Bride, 72, who turned down 42 proposals finally agrees to get married


    Farmer Sion Thomas has proposed to his fianc?e by painting the big question on the side of one of his cows in Pembrokeshire, Wales, UKFarmer Sion Thomas has proposed to his fianc?e by painting the big question on the side of one of his cows in Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK

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    Percy Pigs are now vegetarian
    (Picture: Marks & Spencer/ Triangle News)

    Shoppers have hit out at Marks & Spencer after noticing they had changed their recipe for Percy Pigs to make them vegetarian.

    People who enjoyed the non-veggie Percys are now saying they taste completely different, and they’re starting a campaign to ‘bring back Percy’.

    Although M&S has always sold veggie versions of the sweets, they also made gelatin-filled versions for those who eat meat.

    The store has now removed all animal traces from the sweets, and people aren’t happy.

    One customer named Richard Brackstone said: ‘So I guess this is mainly for those in the UK.

    ‘Are me and my family the only ones outraged by the recipe change to Percy Pigs?

    ‘Marks and Spencer has now changed the recipe for the original Percy’s to the vegetarian style previously used only in other designated products in the range.

    ‘And quite frankly they’re now disgusting, they taste like chemicals – and they must be, because we all agree on this, and we seldom all agree on anything.

    People aren't happy with the change
    (Picture: Marks & Spencer/ Triangle News)

    ‘Now don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against vegetarians. So veggies out there don’t get offended.

    ‘But why do they have to change a recipe much loved since the early 90’s and sold in the £millions every year since, just so vegetarians can buy them as well.’

    He added: ‘Bring Back Percy! Save Percy Pig! What Do We Want? – Original Percy!, When Do We Want Him – Now!’

    Other people have chimed in to say they aren’t happy either.

    Laura Louise Knowles took to Facebook to write an open letter to the store.

    She wrote: ‘Dear Marks and Spencer,

    ‘I understand you might have objectives to meet in terms of reducing your carbon footprint. But really…. Percy Pigs?!?!?

    ‘What on earth was wrong with Veggie Percy and Normal Percy, and come to think of it, Revercy Percy (who is also a big miss in our household!)?

    ‘To change the recipe to a vegetarian only option is so not cool.

    ‘They are NOT THE SAME!!! Not even nearly. Even my five-year-old was not fooled.

    - Picture of a post by Laura Knowles regarding M&S changing Percy Pigs to vegetarian TRIANGLE NEWS 0203 176 5581 // contact@trianglenews.co.uk By Helena Kelly ANGRY shoppers have hit out at Marks and Spencer after noticing they had changed their recipe for Percy Pigs - to make them vegetarian. Foodies insist the new, animal-friendly snacks taste completely different. They are now starting a campaign to ?bring back Percy.? Although M&S has always sold veggie versions of the pink treats, they also made gelatin-fuelled Percys for meat lovers. *TRIANGLE NEWS DOES NOT CLAIM ANY COPYRIGHT OR LICENSE IN THE ATTACHED MATERIAL. ANY DOWNLOADING FEES CHARGED BY TRIANGLE NEWS ARE FOR TRIANGLE NEWS SERVICES ONLY, AND DO NOT, NOR ARE THEY INTENDED TO, CONVEY TO THE USER ANY COPYRIGHT OR LICENSE IN THE MATERIAL. BY PUBLISHING THIS MATERIAL , THE USER EXPRESSLY AGREES TO INDEMNIFY AND TO HOLD TRIANGLE NEWS HARMLESS FROM ANY CLAIMS, DEMANDS, OR CAUSES OF ACTION ARISING OUT OF OR CONNECTED IN ANY WAY WITH USER'S PUBLICATION OF THE MATERIAL*
    (Picture: Laura Louise Knowles/Facebook)

    ‘We’ve tried the veggie option (in our own pursuit of eco friendliness) and quite quickly returned to the delicious silky squishiness of the much-loved gelatin based Percy Pig.

    ‘So please, in the interest of the British nation… I beg you #BRINGBACKPERCY’

    Elizabeth Simpson agreed and wrote: ‘After many years of enjoying Percy, these sweets are now just not the same!

    ‘They have an awful texture and chemical aftertaste.

    ‘This disappointment resulted in me returning my purchased bags of sweets to my local m and s store and demanding a refund.

    ‘Why are such fundamental recipe changes such as this made and not advertised?!

    ‘Very disappointed that Marks and Spencer have ruined a legendary and much loved sweet.’

    Percy Pigs first appeared in M&S stores in 1992.

    The sweets have developed a cult-like status among consumers – a Percy Pig appreciation society has even been set up on Facebook and currently has 250,000 members.

    A spokesperson for M&S commented on the backlash, explaining their decision to remove the gelatin.

    They said: ‘After a lot of hard work (and tasting) we’ve finally perfected a 100% vegetarian Percy – something our customers have been asking us for, for a while!

    ‘Rest assured we’ve tested the new recipe thoroughly to make sure he’s as close to the original as possible and we have haven’t changed any of the really important things that people love about Percy; the flavour is the same, he still has real fruit juice and never has artificial colours or flavours.’

    MORE: The world’s first fully vegetarian city can be found in India

    MORE: McDonald’s is finally offering a vegetarian Happy Meal


    Shoppers are angry at veggie Percy PigsShoppers are angry at veggie Percy Pigs

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    Romantic love of intimate young couple in home bedroom foreplay in the bed.
    Author and psychology of human sexuality professor, Laurie Mintz, discusses a recent study that found that women orgasm 30% compared to a male counterpart (File Picture: iStockphoto)

    Women in heterosexual relationships orgasm 30% less frequently than their male counterparts, according to a recent study.

    The Archives of Sexual Behavior studied 52,500 adults in the US and found that, in relationships, 95% of straight men usually or always climax during sex – compared to only 65 percent of heterosexual women.

    In her book ‘Becoming Cliterate: Why Orgasm Equality Matters – And How to Get It,’ author Laurie Mintz calls this bedroom inequality ‘the orgasm gap.’

    Mintz, who teaches psychology of human sexuality at the University of Florida, told NBC that: ‘The number-one reason for the orgasm gap – and it’s not the only one – is our cultural ignorance to the clitoris.’

    She explained that many women need direct clitoral stimulation to orgasm, but it is not often depicted in ‘media images of sex,’ especially pornography.

    Woman's hands pulling white sheets in ecstasy, orgasm
    According to Mintz, and a 2016 study by the Archives of Sexual Behavior, clitoral stimulation is key for the majority of women (File Picture: Getty Images)

    ‘Instead what we see is women having these fast and fabulous orgasms from intercourse alone,’ Mintz continued.

    A study from the Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy echoed Mintz’s findings. Out of 1,055 women surveyed in June 2015, who ranged from 18 to 94-years-old, more than two-thirds of participants indicated the importance of the clitoris.

    The internet-based survey found that 36.6% of women reported clitoral stimulation was necessary for orgasm. An additional 36% said that, although it was not needed, clitoral stimulation made their orgasms feel better, while only 18.4% of women reported that intercourse alone was enough to climax.

    According to Mintz, the myth that all women should orgasm from intercourse alone has been popularized by a misunderstanding of the ‘g spot’ – which is often depicted as a magic button inside the vagina that leads to immediate toe-curling climax.

    Mintz said the ‘g spot’ is real, and many women find it pleasurable, but she said that it is not the center of female pleasure, which she maintained is the clitoris.

    Backview of an anonymous couple making love, the woman on top, under a patterned duvet.
    While the ‘g spot’ is real and produces pleasure, Mintz said that the clitoris is the center of feminine sexuality, despite a lack of representation in the mainstream media (File Picture: Getty Images)

    ‘What I’m trying to fight against is the pervasive myth that orgasms from vaginal penetration – including the “g spot” – are better, more ideal, the right way… when in fact the vast majority of women need clitoral stimulation to orgasm,’ she said.

    Mainstream pornography not only confuses men about how to pleasure a woman, Mintz said, claiming that it also misrepresents how long the sexual intercourse lasts.

    thumbnail for post ID 9370883Real life rivalry between John Cena and Dwayne Johnson as Furious 9 casting emerges

    She explained that, on average, penetrative sex usually lasts for three to five minutes, despite full-length pornographic films that depict otherwise.

    ‘We have all these men calling into sex therapists worried that they’re not lasting long enough,’ she said, adding that the individualized variety is the best way for a couple to find sexual satisfaction.

    ‘Forget this myth of orgasming from the same act at the same time…adopt a different way of doing sex.’

    According to the Archives of Sexual Behavior, women who reported frequent orgasms with their male partner were more likely to: ‘receive oral sex, be more satisfied with their relationship, ask for what they want in bed, praise their partner for something they did in bed, call/email to tease about doing something sexual, wear sexy lingerie, try new sexual positions, anal stimulation, act out fantasies, and incorporate sexy talk.’


    image - 2019-04-30T100503.073-5282image - 2019-04-30T100503.073-5282

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    One of these vegan face primers sells every minute, here's why
    (Picture: Hourglass/ Metro)

    If you’re looking for the best makeup primer you’ve come to the right place.

    One bottle of the Hourglass Veil Mineral Primer is sold every single minute worldwide.

    Makeup primers may seem like an expensive and unnecessary step in your routine. But prepping your complexion before putting on foundation can be the difference between your makeup staying flawless all day and it sliding off after a couple of hours.

    The Hourglass Veil Mineral Primer claims to ‘create a smooth, even canvas for makeup’ and remedy your ‘redness, minimise the appearance of pores, fine lines and wrinkles’ – what more could you want?

    It’s also worth noting the formulation is vegan, oil-free and provides broad spectrum SPF 15 with mineral-derived sunscreens, titanium and zinc oxide, that are typically less likely to irritate your skin over chemical sunscreens.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjs-kTyHhFN/

    Hourglass is a cruelty free cosmetics brand and as it stands around 80% of their products are vegan, although they’ve pledged to become the first fully vegan luxury cosmetics brand by 2020.

    Here at Metro.co.uk we gave the best-seller a whirl and can confirm the milky white primer is extremely lightweight, gives a beautiful dewy, natural finish, leaving the skin silky smooth and blurred – a little like a photo filter IRL – and it even diffused redness.

    If that’s not enough to persuade you to invest in a bottle, it also has legions of fans who have tried, tested and given it their seal of approval too.

    Online at Space NK, the Hourglass Veil Mineral Primer boasts over 300 reviews, with an average star rating of 4.5 out of 5.

    One happy customer stated: ‘This makes ALL foundations glide on beautifully.’

    Another added: ‘This is my go to primer and has been for years. It goes on silky smooth and gives your skin a great base for any foundation, really helping it last longer. It last for ages too as you don’t need a whole pump each time. It is definitely worth the investment.’

    And if you have oily skin, you’ll be thrilled to hear that ‘This primer is superb at controlling oils, when I use this primer my makeup stays oil free for the whole day.’

    Sure, it’s a little spenny at £49 for 30ml, but think of it as a luxury pick-me-up for your skin.

    Hourglass Veil Mineral Primer, from £17, available from spacenk.com, cultbeauty.co.uk, johnlewis.com and feelunique.com

    MORE: Glossier Bubblewrap: What you need to know about the eye + lip plumping cream

    MORE: New beauty products to buy this payday


    One of these face primers sells every minute, here\'s whyOne of these face primers sells every minute, here\'s why

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    You could earn money to help people battle small talk
    (Picture: Getty)

    If you’re a pop culture genius who’s brilliant at holding a conversation, you could now be hired to prepare people for small talk at events or when socialising and dating.

    The new service has been launched by local services marketplace Bark.com, in light of the new Game of Thrones season showing, which can take over two days and 17 hours to catch up on.

    Members of the public can hire a Pop Culture Coach for around £35 an hour, to get them up to speed with the latest trends.

    Pop Culture Coaches can be hired by anyone who may need to prepare for small talk at events or when socialising and dating.

    Those hiring a coach will be able to choose from a selection of popular shows, sports, music or a mixture of general knowledge to help them learn how to keep a conversation going.

    Guys at Pub Drinking Beer Looking at Smartphone and Having a Great Time.
    The estimated price for the service is £15 an hour based on similar services

    The service will cost £35 an hour, and clients can opt for an additional ‘on-call’ service, where you can text a coach for an instant conversation saviour.

    To be a Pop Culture Coach you must be up to date with TV series and any topic your client desires. You must also demonstrate your knowledge in an initial briefing with the client.

    So, you may need to take some time out to expand your knowledge of various subjects if you want to be any good at this job.

    Kai Feller, Bark.com co-founder, said: ‘With so much media for us to consume, it can almost feel overwhelming to not only keep up with it all, but to be seen to have an opinion, there are only 24 hours in the day after all. We hope that this new service can help ease some of the anxieties associated with having to socialise and always needing to find something to talk about.

    ‘This is a dream job for sport or TV buffs. You’re literally getting paid to talk about your favourite things, whether it be the Premier League, the Masters, Game of Thrones or Killing Eve. If you have knowledge on a pop culture topic, sign up!’

    MORE: You can now get paid to defend people against online trolls

    MORE: Labradoodle needs £130 vet visit after eating £160 in cash


    Are you up to date on Game of Thrones? Earn ??35 an hour to talk about your favourite TV shows, sports and music -Are you up to date on Game of Thrones? Earn ??35 an hour to talk about your favourite TV shows, sports and music -

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    Switching to a menstrual cup was a revelation
    (Picture: Getty)

    Last week when hitting up my trusty friend Google in the pursuit of purchasing a new menstrual cup, Google – who has a habit of sharing related queries – suggested I might want to know if I could ‘pee in a menstrual cup’, followed with a recommendation for ‘bacterial vaginosis’, ‘problems with menstrual cups’ and ‘menstrual cup constipation’.

    I was alarmed by the daunting information and myths surrounding a period care product. Case point: your urethra (which FYI is where you pee from), is located above the opening of the vagina, therefore you cannot pee in a menstrual cup when it’s inside your vagina.

    I’m no Google (although you’re welcome to hit me up for beauty advice) but I am a dedicated menstrual cup user, who switched cotton tampons and unsightly winged pads for the silicone alternative over 18 months ago. I haven’t looked back since.

    In this time, I can confirm I’ve had little to no problems, including menstrual cup induced constipation or bacterial vaginosis.

    Many switch to menstrual cups to help fight pollution (plastic-free periods and all that); according to Mooncup, a major menstrual cup brand, the average woman uses at least 11,000 throwaway sanitary products in a lifetime. If you multiply that number by all the women on the planet, that equals… a whole lot of waste destined for a landfill, or the ocean.

    Although I’m conscious about sustainability and the paper trail periods leave, I made the change because I was tired of sneaking and shoving tampons up my sleeve when walking to the toilets at work – when will more clothing brands give us pockets?

    I also refuse to continue paying tax on tampons and towels that are an unavoidable necessity, not a luxury product. And, to be completely honest, tampons dry me out.

    woman holding a menstrual cup
    (Picture: Getty)

    Menstrual cups however can hold up to eight hours’ flow, compared with four to eight hours with a tampon – and one cup covers light to super plus days. As they are reusable and can last years, they are much better for the environment.

    They’re made of body-safe medical-grade silicone, a high quality material which contains no dyes, BPA, phthalates, plastic, bleaches or toxins. They’re typically available in two sizes, related to age and childbearing history, not your flow.

    There’s no denying purchasing and using a menstrual cup is a getting-in-touch-with-yourself experience. After all, a cup does hold menses rather than soaking it up.

    But while changing a cup can be messy, you’ll be hard pushed to spill it all over your knickers.

    Despite being easy to insert, getting a menstrual cup in right definitely takes practice. The tulip shaped cup has a stem that needs to be trimmed before use so it sits just inside your vagina. You may find yourself sat on the toilet fiddling around until it feels comfortable. But persevere, as you will eventually find the knack. Just light some candles, put on Marvin Gaye. I joke… unless that helps.

    When in place properly, the rim forms to your body by suctioning to the vaginal wall. Yes, you may hear the (gentle) suction release and no, it won’t fall out as you run for your train and can be worn when swimming.

    As for leakage it’s more reliable than a tampon, although I recommend wearing a light liner alongside your cup for the first few times. When you figure out the exact placement for your cup, it won’t leak, but that does take some time.

    In a private bathroom the process of emptying a menstrual cup is as simple as retrieving, emptying, rinsing and reinserting. As for the inevitable public bathroom situation, you may have to get a little creative about your methods, by the means of emptying and wiping clean with toilet roll – periods will never be a glamorous affair, even though it is the very thing that gives life to all of us.

    To clean your cup thoroughly (which you should do every cycle), you boil it. Just be sure your housemates aren’t in.

    Do bear in mind, you don’t have to empty your menstrual cup anywhere near as much as you would a tampon. Most menstrual cup brands recommend you empty and rinse the every four to eight hours. However you may need to change your cup more frequently if you have heavy periods to avoid leakage. But we’re talking heavy, as in soaks-through-a-super-tampon-in-sixty-minutes, heavy.

    As for how frequently you replace your menstrual cup, if you look after it and boil it on the regular, there’s no reason it shouldn’t serve you for a very long time.

    How each woman approaches her period will always be a matter of personal preference. It’s your body.

    But for me, menstrual cups have transformed the way I deal with my monthly cycle – I wish I’d tried them sooner.

    MORE: Which menstrual cup is right for you?

    MORE: How to use a menstrual cup


    Menstrual cup with bright stars on pink backgroundMenstrual cup with bright stars on pink background

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