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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    Sign on facade advertising Impossible Whopper, a meat-free item using engineered, plant-protein based burger patty from food technology company Impossible, during a limited market test at a Burger King restaurant in the San Francisco Bay Area, Danville, California, June 26, 2019. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)
    Some beef with your plant-based burger? (Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

    Bad news for vegetarians hoping to relive meat-eating memories: Burger King’s new plant-based, ‘bleeding’ Impossible Whopper is cooked alongside beef and chicken.

    This month the fast food chain announced the US-wide launch of the burger following a trial in the St Louis area in April. Though the burger was not labelled ‘vegetarian’, it was advertised as ‘0% beef’ and ‘made from plants’. The patty’s main ingredients are soy and potato proteins.

    However, the fine print on Burger King’s website states the Whopper is flame-grilled in the same broiler used for beef and chicken, meaning it will almost certainly come into contact with meat.

    One former employee said that the in-restaurant production line means that ‘veggie burgers get soaked in meat juices’.

    Vegetarian Twitter users are not happy.

    ‘Why would you serve plant-based burgers cooked with meat, though?,’ asked one user.

    Another user called the fiasco a ‘misleading, big fail’.

    This isn’t the first time Burger King has gotten beef from vegetarians. Earlier this month, the restaurant was criticised because its new halloumi burger is cooked in the same fryer as chicken and fish. – even though Burger King promotes the burger as a ‘meat-free’ option.

    At the time, a spokesperson told the Metro.co.uk: ‘At this moment in time we’re not operationally able to facilitate separate fryers and oil filtration systems in all of our restaurants. However this is a focus for us and our team are actively looking into solutions for how we can change this in the future.’

    They also emphasised that – like the Impossible Whopper – the halloumi burger is not described as ‘vegetarian’, but as ‘meat-free’.

    For vegetarians who are strict about meat contamination then, this rules almost all the Burger King options out – anything fried (like onion rings and fries) is likely to have come into contact with meat. The veggie burger however, which is not fried, is fully vegetarian.

    We asked Burger King for comment on the plant-based Whopper, but have not heard from them as of yet. We’ll update this article if we do.

    MORE: This yoga workout is perfect for toning and firming your legs

    MORE: Drinks with ‘sexist’ names have been banned from the Great British Beer Festival

    MORE: Mixed Up: ‘I love the colour of my skin, but it doesn’t define me or tell you my story’


    Burger King Offers Meatless Whopper In Its St. Louis LocationsBurger King Offers Meatless Whopper In Its St. Louis Locations

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    Being a woman on the internet is tough when you’re talking about sexism. You’ll experience mansplaining, mandozing and men who refuse to accept that sexism even exists.

    When women speak out about their own gendered experiences, men aren’t always receptive, often going on the offensive and refusing to accept women’s stories as valid evidence.

    Social media is a platform where women can unabashedly talk about their experiences, though it can lead to being trolled.

    Many tweets have gone viral showing everyday sexism from a female perspective, gaining support from others who have experienced similar.

    But when women do speak out, they’ll receive death or rape threats and gender-based insults such as being called a ‘c***’ or ‘slag’ simply for speaking about their personal experience.

    Some men will entirely deny women’s personal experiences, erasing the problem and claiming that women are making it all up.

    Even when they’re seemingly engaged, some men may be sealioning, insisting on undeniable proof and asking questions in bad faith in a round-and-round discourse that doesn’t further the conversation.

    They’ll ask for empirical evidence, suggesting that a woman’s experience isn’t valid unless they can provide hard proof, which isn’t always possible.

    Leah B has experienced this in Facebook groups.

    ‘When we [female users] commented about sexism in the community, several men jumped on the post basically to prove us wrong,’ she told Metro.co.uk.

    ‘Several other women talked about personal experiences, but this one guy in particular got really angry and demanded “real evidence”.

    ‘We told him more of our stories. I told him how I had been part of a group that routinely told women ‘tits or get the f*** out’ whenever they posted.

    ‘But he shut all of those down. They didn’t count as evidence to him. As far as he was concerned, we probably made all of it up.’

    Dismissal is a prevalent tactic used by trolls and others online. Consider the popularity of the Didn’t Happen Of The Year Awards and the culture of ‘pics or it didn’t happen’.

    This obsession with empiricism – particularly when the speaker is female – is a popular derailing strategy used to diminish women’s credibility.

    *Illo request* Lucy Goes Dating- looking for love as a dating blogger
    It’s hard to be a woman on the internet (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Some groups are proficient in the denial of women’s voices.

    These groups – usually floating around the manosphere – often discuss the ‘cancer’ of feminism and complain about how women rule society without consequence.

    While women are using the likes of Twitter to discuss #MeToo and Time’s Up, some men are having the conversation separately and from a different perspective.

    To them, women are playing the victim to defame men. Followers of these groups are usually referred to as men’s rights activists (MRAs).

    Partha Sadhukhan is one MRA who writes about misandry on his blog, The Male Factor. He believes women complaining online is just ‘drama’.

    ‘Most often these are mere stories and not even iota of truth in those complaints,’ he tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘These social media complaints are more of exaggeration and self-proclaiming victimhood and attention-seeking drama. It becomes evident when every such story is marred with contradictions and illogical demands.’

    When asked whether he thinks most men feel this way, he tells us that men who don’t have simply fallen into the trap of feminism.

    Partha says: ‘I have found that many men not only listen to such complaints but also believe in those – that is why this feminist drama continues.’

    Partha also has little faith the genders will be able to reconcile their differences and blames women for it. But he claims men are willing subjects when it comes to discourse.

    ‘Today, the trusting relationship between the genders is vanishing,’ he tells us. ‘This will worsen unless feminism is contained.

    ‘We MRAs are always ready to discuss various gender issues in an open manner. My blog is a great example of that.’

    Similarly, MRA vlogger Avishek Saha thinks there is merit in women telling true stories of abuse but thinks movements like #MeToo are not the right method.

    ‘#MeToo is usually a plea for attention with the motive of saving a career, to cover up adultery, or to seek revenge,’ he tells us.

    ‘There is a massive divide between public opinion and the sound truth. What frustrates men is that women are given a free pass with the victimhood narrative, which allows them to get away with behaviour men could never get away with.

    ‘It’s happening frequently but it is not acknowledged which is all the more frustrating.

    ‘It’s unfair for a certain group of feminists to promulgate the narrative that all men are a certain way. They should start pointing the finger at themselves.’

    Two women are killed by their male partner every week in England and Wales and 40% are killed by gendered violence.

    There are 3.4 million female sexual violence victims to 631,000 male.

    If facts are what these men are after, the official numbers do paint a bleak picture.

    It’s important to mention that when women speak about experiences of sexism, they are not referring to all men – as men are not a monolith – but specifically their individual experience.

    This is where misunderstanding and defensiveness kick in. Men who question women’s stories do so because they want to prove that men as a whole are not bad – which is rarely what women were suggesting in the first place.

    When incel Elliot Rogers killed his schoolmates as a result of frustrations with being a virgin, many spoke about the extreme dangers of misogyny.

    In response, #NotAllMen became popular, ‘as a defensive knee-jerk reaction which just serves to derail conversations about sexism, and shift the focus from victims of sexism to a perceived but nonexistent slight to oneself’.

    As a result the conversation was derailed.

    illustration of men and a woman on their phone
    Will men and women ever be able to have nuanced conversation on gender online? (Illustration: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Even within MRA spaces – where the more extreme among them advocate for violence – not all men think like this.

    That some men identify with incel (involuntarily celibate) communities as a space for solidarity shows the interest in having discussions about gender and feeling heard.

    Avishek thinks, despite the obvious misogyny and racism (Indian incels are called currycels) present in these groups, the manosphere is still compelling.

    ‘There are not many communities where men’s woes are addressed,’ he says, ‘and none of them are mainstream, so that’s why it’s compelling—it’s not easy to find and you feel alone otherwise.’

    Sometimes when men attempt to explain their frustrations, MRAs claim they’re bashed with anti-men messages which send them to dark corners.

    At the moment, a disconnect is occurring – men and women are one-upping each other in the gender issues debate rather than pausing to understand.

    Men should be able to speak freely about their issues while understanding that extreme sexism faced by women doesn’t delegitimise their experiences.

    There are several solutions to pacify the situation which include demonstrating that gender equality is something to be revered, not feared.

    To have nuanced debate and conversation, the answer is compassion and patience on both sides.

    Men can get involved in women’s issues by showing support and doing their own research, rather than questioning and demanding evidence, and speaking separately about their own problems rather than over a woman’s story.

    Only then can the conversation may move forward.

    MORE: The female experience includes so much pain we end up choosing it

    MORE: It is not a woman’s responsibility to make a man a better human being

    MORE: This guide from the 1940s explains how men should deal with female employees


    Why is male criticism of women so, so bad?Why is male criticism of women so, so bad?

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    mcdonald's mcnuggets
    Anybody else have Careless Whisper stuck in their head now? (Picture: McDonald’s)

    Yes, you read that right – McDonald’s have taken the chicken nugget to a whole new level with their new Spicy McNuggets.

    Coming complete with a Tobasco dip, these nugs have already been trialed in Asia and America, and are a permanent fixture on the Australian menu.

    Now that they’re being sold in the UK for the very first time, here’s what you need to know about when you can get your hands on the new Spicy McNuggets…

    When can you get the new Spicy Chicken McNuggets?

    Nugget fans everywhere, rejoice! For as of 10:30am today, August 7, you can get McDonald’s new Spicy Chicken McNuggets.

    However the Spicy McNuggets will only be available for seven weeks, so get them while you can.

    These nugs come in packs of six for £3.19, nine for £3.49, and 20 for £4.99 .

    McDonald???s is adding SPICY nuggets to its menu
    Cue saxophone solo (Picture: McDonald’s)

    Y Not festival-goers were given the chance to try the Spicy McNuggets in July from a designated van which was travelling around the UK this summer.

    YouTuber Mark Ferris was one of the first people to give them a whirl at Y Not, and he said in an Instagram post: ‘It may be cold at Y Not festival but Mcdonald’s uk are turning up the 🔥🔥 I’ve been given exclusive access to the new Spicy Nugget van! You will NOT be disappointed.’

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    McDonald's McNugget Van is touring the UK this summerMcDonald's McNugget Van is touring the UK this summer

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    Illustration of someone sat at their laptop with a cup of tea on the side
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Do you always offer to pick up tasks that need to be done?

    Do you do this even if your plate is already full?

    If you’ve answered yes to both of these questions, it’s highly like that you’re taking part in a work culture that we have coined as ‘offerism’.

    In its most basic form it is a constant need to please others by always being the first one to raise your hand at work. You don’t only agree to help when someone asks you directly, but also when it is a general request addressed to the entire room.

    Even when there isn’t anything that needs your immediate attention, you will find something that needs to be done.

    Is the kettle empty? You’ll fill it up and ask the team if anyone needs a cuppa.

    Is there an overdue admin job that no one wants to take on? No bother, because you’re coming to the rescue.

    ‘Offerism is a characteristic or behavioural trait of someone who has an overwhelming tendency to offer their support or services, even if it negatively impacts their livelihood or well-being,’ Tracey Livingston, life coach and founder of TraceyLiv Coaching and Training, tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘Offerism likely stems from beliefs and feelings of “not being good enough” or perfectionism or the need to overdeliver in order to be liked or validated.’

    Some people may enjoy being the one that others turn to when they need help, but it can also be connected to a fear of saying no.

    The more you say yes, the more people will assume that you’re going to continue on this same path – and so you’re stuck in a vicious circle.

    By always adding to your to-do-list, you could end up exacerbating self-esteem issues, as well as developing mental health problems.

    ‘In conflict management, offerism is akin to accommodating,’ said Tracey.

    ‘We want to get other people’s needs met at the expense of our own. We accommodate their requests. We say “yes” when we mean no.

    ‘And when accommodating is out of balance this can lead to burnout, resentment and even an employee quitting, which can be a shock for employers since the person next [sic] spoke up and said something was wrong.’

    Some people also use offerism as a mechanism to move up in the business they’re working for.

    They believe that by constantly being available and keen to take on any task, others will view them as motivated, determined and reliable.

    Unfortunately, it can have the opposite effect.

    For instance, if your offerism is directed at management, they may see you as a pushover, while colleagues see you as a brown-noser.

    According to Carol Ann Rice, a life coach and personal development expert, you’re better off setting boundaries.

    ‘Strong boundaries actually increase respect – you can’t win people over by being weak or a “yes” person,’ she tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘People will see through this and take you less seriously or see you as a “crawler,” trying to win favours.

    ‘The important thing to remember is be helpful but don’t overload yourself, don’t expect praise, recognition or feedback because you said yes to everything – as this will come when your work and contribution is won on merit and excellence, not servitude and submission.’

    Generally, the cons outweigh the pros when it comes to offerism, but that isn’t always the case.

    A recent survey conducted by Cornerstone OnDemand revealed that 87% of 2,000 participants take on a colleague’s workload in their absence.

    Out of this group, 39% said it allowed them to learn new skills, while a third felt more confident.

    If the work they took on belonged to a senior team member, 40% also enjoyed that their colleagues trusted them with it it.

    Rina Bajaj, a counselling psychologist, tells Metro.co.uk that it’s natural to want to make a good impression on others, and that this is connected to how we manage relationships as a whole (not just at work).

    ‘Creating a good impression is a natural part of trying to build a connection with others, as we are relational beings,’ she said.

    ‘Our relational styles can differ and this is largely influenced by our previous experiences of relationships and the patterns that we have created to elicit a response.

    ‘These patterns are also played out in our interactions in the workplace.

    ‘It’s usually when we have a lower self esteem or self worth that we may look for conditional responses and feelings of worth, which may contribute to the development of people pleasing or “offerism”.’

    The pros and cons of offerism

    According to Rina, these are the pros and cons of offerism:

    Pros

    • It gets you noticed
    • It shows that you’re motivated
    • It shows that you’re committed to your job
    • It can be helpful to others

    Cons

    • It can feed into a team culture of competitiveness
    • People may feel that you’re challenging them or undermining them
    • You can end up doing too much which can leave you burnt out

    Here’s the key thing to remember: if you’re comfortable taking on more work and it makes you happy, that’s great.

    However, if you feel overworked or is starts to affect your mental health, then you should re-evalute the situation.

    Be cautious of greedy colleagues, too. If it feels like others are taking advantage of your kind nature or that you’re only delegated tasks that are boring (basically the ones no one else wants to do), then it’s time to put your foot down.

    By all means, offer to help your colleagues and managers, but keep in mind what your responsibilities are and remember that it’s OK to say no.

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    MORE: What to do if you hate your job


    how exactly should you sign off an email 3f-bfa8how exactly should you sign off an email 3f-bfa8

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    McDonald's spicy nuggets in a box on an orange background
    These look delicious, but are they delicious? (Picture: McDonald’s)

    When McDonald’s revealed that it would be adding Spicy Chicken McNuggets to its menu, we were excited.

    We’re fans of the current breadcrumb goodness, so the possibility of a fiery version was right up our street.

    The popular fast-food brand also boasted a Tobasco dip to go with it and we were practically licking our lips.

    The fiery new flavour has already been trialled in the US and Asia, and is a permanent feature on the Australian menu, but this is the first time it has been sold in the UK.

    And today is the glorious moment it arrives in shops.

    So of course, we decided to taste it. It was hard (not really) but someone had to do it.

    What do the Mcdonald’s Spicy McNuggets taste like?

    Metro.co.uk says: ‘If I’m honest I expected moderate heat at best. I know McDonald’s have to sell these things to millions of people and not everyone enjoys chugging milk after a meal.

    ‘McNuggets, or as I call them nugs, were my favourite McDonald’s menu item as a kid. There’s a lot of history between me and the nugs; I was excited to see a new recipe since they’re not usually a menu item that gets changed.

    ‘It’s impossible to miss the difference in colour. Goodbye golden nuggets, hello orange!’

    The nine box of spicy chicken mcnuggets
    They are pretty orange (Picture: McDonald’s)

    ‘Sadly the difference in colour is about all you’re going to notice.

    ‘I couldn’t detect any real heat on the nuggets themselves, which is a slap in the face to aficionados like myself.

    ‘The only saving grace is the accompanying spicy tomato dip. While still really not spicy at all, the mild chilli flavour is a nice alternative to the usual sweet Heinz (which I adore).

    ‘I’d recommend the dip. If you can taste any real difference in the nuggets then you have a far better pallet than me.

    ‘If you’re at a McDonald’s I’d try asking for the dip, but I wouldn’t make the journey just to try the nuggets.’

    If you’re not convinced, then, by all means, go try it for yourself.

    The Spicy McNuggets come in a six, nine or 20-pack, and cost £3.19, £3.49 and £4.99, respectively.

    Go forth and get yours.

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    McDonald’s is adding SPICY nuggets to its menuMcDonald’s is adding SPICY nuggets to its menu

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    Three-way split image of a burger from Slutty Vegan in Atlanta, people queueing up and someone putting sauce on a burger
    People are very keen to try the burgers (Picture: Slutty Vegan; CNN)

    The plant-based burger joint in the US city of Atlanta has become a sensation in the city and on social media.

    Having just celebrated its first birthday (for which it handed out free fruit and vegetables), the Slutty Vegan has 252,000 followers on Instagram and hundreds of people queue up for hours every day in order to try the dishes – which includes the ‘One Night Stand’, ‘Ménage à Trois’ and ‘Sloppy Toppy’ burgers.

    The ‘One Night Stand’ is an Impossible Burger patty (which ‘bleeds’) topped with vegan bacon, vegan cheese, caramelised onions, lettuce, tomato, and ‘slutty vegan sauce’ on a vegan Hawaiian bun, while the ‘Ménage à Trois’ includes vegan shrimp.

    Everything comes with a side of ‘slutty fries’.

    ‘Slutty Vegan has nothing to do with sex,’ founder Pinky Cole told CNN.

    ‘Being sluttified means to have the ultimate euphoric experience from eating a plant-based burger.

    ‘But it’s bigger than just the food, it’s about creating a cultural experience for people to help them to re-imagine food.’

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BrqatDllY3k/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

    Cole opened the restaurant to bring a unique source of accessible, tasty vegan food to the black community in the rapidly-gentrifying neighborhood west of downtown Atlanta – where barbecued meat is popular.

    The Slutty Vegan and Cole have positioned themselves at the heart of the black vegan movement in the US, with many black celebrities – including Tiffany Haddish, Tyler Perry, and Snoop Dogg – becoming ‘sluttified’ patrons.

    Following such a successful first year, Cole is planning to open a whole chain of ‘slutty’ restaurants in Atlanta.

    We can’t wait for them to come to the UK.

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    People are queuing for hours to eat at the 'Slutty Vegan'People are queuing for hours to eat at the 'Slutty Vegan'

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    Split image showing someone carrying a Selfridges bag and on the other side a rail of clothes with a Depop sign in the background
    (Picture: Getty)

    Once confined to swipes and clicks, fashion marketplace Depop is now moving towards physical stores.

    Depop is home to the trendiest of trends.

    Almost all of its 13 million users are under 25 and the brand has made its success on allowing people to resell their wardrobes of vintage streetwear, platform trainers and diamanté chokers.

    Independent designers and boutiques can also use the app to sell their products, and profiles are often presented with Instagram sleekness, selling a lifestyle along with a bobbly FILA fleece.

    Following the opening of two shops in New York and Los Angeles, Depop has now arrived in London with a pop-up space in the Selfridges department store, which will run for three months.

    The shop, which can be found in the Selfridges Designer Studio, features a curated selection of Depop’s top sellers.

    One seller will be showcased each week and given the chance to exhibit exclusive items from their collection.

    Some items will also be available on the Selfridges website. We took a look at what’s on offer and the items won’t come cheap.

    There is a pair of vintage Versace floral and chequerboard-print jeans for £225, and an American Madness Grateful Dead t-shirt for £110.

    But there are some lower-priced things, too, such as a Mickey Mouse t-shirt for £30.

    Each month will be themed, with specially-selected sellers, workshops and events, including sessions on how to run a successful Depop account.

    The focus throughout August is ‘entrepreneurship’ and features collections from Depop influencers Bella McFadden – also known as InternetGirl – and Ladi Kazeem, alongside pieces from Depop founder Simon Beckerman.

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    Depop launches first pop-up store in SelfridgesDepop launches first pop-up store in Selfridges

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    Sunset in Wirral, Merseyside with lighthouse in the background
    It’s a beautiful sight (Picture: Peter Byrne/PA Wire)

    Today is National Lighthouse Day.

    Who doesn’t love a good lighthouse? Seriously, tell us. Give us their names and addresses so we can hunt them down and demand to know why – because lighthouses rock.

    ‘The Lighthouse was then a silvery, misty-looking tower with a yellow eye that opened suddenly and softly in the evening,’ Virginia Woolf once famously quipped.

    ‘Now … it was a stark tower on a bare rock.’

    She wasn’t wrong.

    From Robert Louis Stevenson (who prior to rising to fame as the author of Kidnapped and Treasure Island began his career as a lighthouse engineer) through to the beloved children’s classic The Lighthouse Keeper’s Cat, lighthouses have long exerted an influence over the British imagination.  

    Consider the lighthouse that plays a central role in the bizarre 90s children’s TV show Round the Twist.

    Admittedly, it was filmed in Australia – but it became an after-school staple in Britain nonetheless. The point is: the British public is absolutely lighthouse-mad. We cannot get enough of them.

    But where can you see the best ones? Here’s a run-down of some the most beautiful lighthouses in the UK.

    South Stack Lighthouse, North Wales

    A sunset view of Holyhead lighthouse in North Wales
    You have to admit this looks pretty nice (Picture: Getty/iStockphoto)

    Situated three miles away from Holyhead, this beautiful lighthouse has been operating since 1809.

    It’s open for visitors seasonally but be careful: it’s apparently haunted and has even been named one of the ‘spookiest places’ in Britain.

    South Foreland Lighthouse, Kent

    South Foreland lighthouse rising above the white cliffs of Dover
    South Foreland lighthouse rising above the white cliffs of Dover (Picture: Forster/REX)

    Look at that vista.

    Completed in 1843, it was the first lighthouse in the UK to use electric light and we stan an innovative lighthouse queen.

    And for all you cinephiles out there, the lighthouse once served as a location for an episode of the Chuckle Brothers.

    The lighthouse at Beachy Head, East Sussex

    The lighthouse at Beachy Head, East Sussex, England
    Unlike any of its peers on this list this one is set at sea (Picture: Blackbeck/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

    The lighthouse at Beachy Head has served as the backdrop to the album cover of Throbbing Gristle’s seminal album 20 Jazz Funk Greats.

    In 2011, the owners announced that they could no longer afford to keep repainting the lighthouse in its iconic red-and-white colours but, happily, a public campaign raised enough money to save the stripes.

    Point of Ayr lighthouse, North Wales

     Point of Ayr Lighthouse inTalacre in Wales seen in background with the beach stretching in front
    Point of Ayr lighthouse, with no ghosts in sight for the time being (Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

    What is it with Welsh lighthouses and the paranormal?

    This one is also said to be haunted, with reported sightings of a spectral figure standing on the balcony in old-timey clothes.

    It has now been honoured with a modern art installation of a man made of silver, titled The Keeper, which looks more like a robot than a ghost.

    The lighthouse is now a private property, the last time it went on the market it sold for a paltry £100,000.

    By London property price standards, it’s a steal – let’s all move to a haunted lighthouse in North Wales.

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    Summer weather June 27thSummer weather June 27th

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    Summer hasn’t peaked just yet – everyone’s going to be getting outdoors and active on The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day (Picture: Getty)

    It’s only mid-August and it feels like we’ve reached peak summer.

    We’ve had our heatwaves, BBQs and beach days, and the season’s big TV shows have all come to an end.

    But you only need to visit your local gym or sports centre to see that the events calendar is only just revving up for summer – and it’s bound to make us feel better than sitting on the sofa.

    In fact, this Bank Holiday weekend, there’s going to be a whole day dedicated to fitness and getting active with events going on all across the country to get us moving.

    Team GB
    Join the nation in getting active during the August Bank Holiday and feel the benefits (Picture: Toyota/Team GB)

    This August, the hugely successful participation campaign, ‘I Am Team GB’ returns, culminating in The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day on 24th August, where Team GB and Toyota are giving people up and down the UK the opportunity to get active and have fun in their local area – all free of charge!

    It’s one giant, nationwide event where you might rediscover an activity you haven’t tried since school, or fall in love with an event for the first time.

    It could change your fitness habits for life, or give you the chance to help young children or elderly relatives find the sport that will change theirs.

    There are plenty of reasons why many of us are making the choice to get a bit more active – and hearing them will make it seem like a total no-brainer.

    Team GB
    This year, even Olympian Laura Kenny (centre) is going to be taking part in The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day (Picture: Toyota/Team GB)

    For starters, studies show that moderate physical activity (like walking, swimming or dancing) that helps meet the recommended 30 minutes of exercise we need five days a week, is enough to lower your risk of major illnesses (like heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and cancer) by up to 50 per cent.

    It also helps boost your overall mood by reducing the risk of stress or depression while improving your sleep, which will make life’s daily struggles seem a little more manageable.

    You’ll continue to reap these rewards into old age, firstly because increased mobility broadens your opportunities – and your outlook – on life.

    On top of that, it could reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, which means that if young ones can find enjoyment in sports early on, they will feel lifelong benefits.

    Bring the whole family to a community event in your local area and show them just how enjoyable getting fit with other people can be (Photo: Getty)

    That’s why there will be events that suit every age group, interest and ability level on The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day.

    For example, it might be a chance to take young ones for their first taste of karate – or even the ideal excuse for you to join in with them!

    Then there are the sports that are easier on the joints, like Taikwando, lanes swimming or bowls, which could help older relatives to gently move a little bit more.

    What’s great about I Am Team GB is that it’s a grassroots movement, supported by local volunteers called Games Makers, who encourage us all to get active within our communities, which has huge health benefits in itself.

    Getting involved with your local sporting community could broaden your social prospects no end. So, what are you waiting for? (Picture: Getty)

    The social aspect of fitness – whether it’s meeting new people or taking friends with you – gives us a reason to go back week after week by improving the overall enjoyment.

    It’s even better when you can get active with other family members, by getting involved with multi-player sports like tennis, park runs and badminton lessons on The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day.

    Bonding and building relationships while doing something other than eating out or going to the cinema means there are even more reasons to introduce activity into your family.

    So, what are you waiting for? Joining in with this weekend’s activities couldn’t be easier, simply go to iamteamgb.com to sign up.


    I Am Team GBI Am Team GB

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    McDonald’s new spicy nuggets slammed for 'not being spicy'
    Where da spice at? (Pictures: MetroJoe)

    McDonald’s so-called spicy nuggets have landed in stores today and the votes are in.

    Well, it turns out they’re not that spicy.

    The new orange nugget certainly looks different to the golden icon, but some customers have been left disappointed by the taste.

    It’s been branded ‘1 out of 5’ on the spice scale, with one angry nugget fan so upset they said their ‘disappointment is immeasurable’.

    But there have been some constructive comments, with others saying the ‘flavour’ makes a ‘nice difference’ to the standard nugget.

    However, there does appear to be a winner from today’s launch.

    The new spicy tomato sauce, which accompanies every box, has been credited with giving the new nuggets an extra ‘pep’ which is missing from the crispy coating.

    So what was the verdict from today’s hungry diners?

    ‘Not spicy in any way’

    ‘What’s the point?’

    Not at all pleased

    Saved by the spicy sauce

    ‘Spice rating – 1/5’

    Another spice win for the sauce

    The Spicy McNuggets come in a six, nine or 20-pack, and cost £3.19, £3.49 and £4.99, respectively.

    Metro.co.uk's review of McDonald's new spicy nuggets:

    Metro.co.uk says: ‘If I’m honest I expected moderate heat at best. I know McDonald’s have to sell these things to millions of people and not everyone enjoys chugging milk after a meal.

    ‘McNuggets, or as I call them nugs, were my favourite McDonald’s menu item as a kid. There’s a lot of history between me and the nugs; I was excited to see a new recipe since they’re not usually a menu item that gets changed.

    ‘It’s impossible to miss the difference in colour. Goodbye golden nuggets, hello orange!

    ‘Sadly the difference in colour is about all you’re going to notice.

    ‘I couldn’t detect any real heat on the nuggets themselves, which is a slap in the face to aficionados like myself.

    ‘The only saving grace is the accompanying spicy tomato dip. While still really not spicy at all, the mild chilli flavour is a nice alternative to the usual sweet Heinz (which I adore).

    ‘I’d recommend the dip. If you can taste any real difference in the nuggets then you have a far better pallet than me.

    ‘If you’re at a McDonald’s I’d try asking for the dip, but I wouldn’t make the journey just to try the nuggets.’

    MORE: When can you get McDonald’s new Spicy Chicken McNuggets?

    MORE: The McDonald’s Spicy Chicken McNuggets have arrived – here’s what they taste like


    PRC_79266085PRC_79266085

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    kfc snack box
    KFC chicken, the likes of which you could be tucking into…gratis (Picture: KFC)

    Next Thursday (25 August) is A-Level Results Day. Whether you worked really hard, or sacked them off, whether your results spell good news or the death of your ambitions, it’s going to be a pretty stressful day.

    The good news is that KFC, in partnership with discount website Student Beans, are offering a free snack box to everyone getting their results.

    Chances are you’ll be getting pissed later on, whether in celebration or despair, so it’s a good idea to line your stomach with some greasy, disgusting-yet-delicious fast food.

    How do you go about getting this finger-licking treat, you ask?

    Well, you just need to download the KFC Colonel Club app; sign up, and add your Student Beans ID number.

    After you’ve done this, head to your nearest restaurant, buy a ‘Krushem’ for £1.99, scan the app, request a free snack box and voila.

    FYI, a snack box usually costs £1.99, so you’re not saving a load of money. It’s not worth rushing back to do your A-levels again just so you have some student ID.

    Inside a snack box you get chips and your choice of recipe chicken, popcorn chicken, mini breast fillet, or two hot wings.

    If you fancy filling your results day with chicken, Nando’s is running a similar deal that grants you a starter or three chicken wings as long as you can show them your results.

    Where were all these deals when we did our exams?

    MORE: McDonald’s new spicy nuggets slammed for ‘not being spicy’

    MORE: KFC is selling bottles of its Supercharger spicy mayo but only for four weeks

    MORE: KFC’s Hacker Burger mashes up a Zinger fillet with a hash brown, cheese, gravy, and more


    kfc snack box featured-3179kfc snack box featured-3179

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    People on the bee-friendly farm
    Morrisons has launched ‘Project Pollinator’ (Picture: Morrisons)

    Morrisons has launched Project Pollinator, a farming scheme that has transformed 57 acres of farmland into nectar rich habitats to increase the bee population on farms by up to 55%.

    Working with farmers, Morrisons is launching Bee-friendly products, with one the most popular being Bee-Friendly eggs which are now available in 300 Morrisons stores nationwide

    The programme has been introduced following growing concerns about the decline in wild bees throughout the UK, echoed in a recent UN report on potential mass extinction.

    Initially launched with Morrisons free range egg farmers, the scheme has so far seen 57 acres of bee friendly pollen and nectar rich habitat planted across the UK.

    80% of the farms supplying directly in to Morrisons Chippendale egg packing site in Yorkshire have now subscribed to the project.

    Morrisons agriculture team has worked with the Bumblebee Conservation Trust to formulate a unique bee-friendly flower mixture, designed to optimise bee numbers.

    People in the farm
    They currently have bee-friendly eggs for sale (Picture: Morrisons)

    The mixture of plants – including Phacelia, Red Clover and Sainfoin – are drilled in to 5% of the land on each farm to establish dedicated bumblebee habitats.

    Morrisons has even trained farmers to become ‘bee walkers’, so that they can monitor the number of bees on their farm, as well as being taught how to spot different species of bumblebees.

    Gill Perkins, CEO of Bumblebee Conservation Trust said: ‘Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of insects. But sadly these charismatic creatures are struggling to survive and the loss of habit has been a primary reason for this.

    ‘Morrisons work to make their farms ‘bee friendly’ – by ensuring land is set aside for habitat and providing bumblebee identification courses – has been an amazing success. It’s a brilliant initiative.’

    Sophie Throup, Agriculture Manager at Morrisons added: ‘Looking after our farmed and natural environment is important for us and our customers. Our bees play a vital role in pollinating our crops and we want to work with our farmers look after them.

    ‘The eggs from our bee-friendly farms give our customers the chance to support our bee population and we hope to roll out this scheme to other types of farming.’

    MORE: Sausage rolls, ready meals and crisps could get ‘calorie tax’ under new plan

    MORE: Why do some men deny that women’s lived experiences of sexism are real?


    MORRISONS FARMING PROJECT HELPS INCREASE BEE NUMBERS BY 55%MORRISONS FARMING PROJECT HELPS INCREASE BEE NUMBERS BY 55%

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    A heartwarming video shows the moment a young boy helped to feed his great granddad, who has Alzheimer’s disease.

    Six-year-old Colton Keith patiently fed his great granddad Franklin Frye, 79, coleslaw and baked potato at the dinner table at his family house in Saltville, Virginia, last month.

    Franklin suffers from both dementia and Alzheimer’s and is unable to do anything by himself, according to Colton’s mum Nichole Eastridge.

    While filming Colton taking care of his grandpa, Nichole can’t stop telling him how proud she is of her son as she instructs him on how to best help Franklin eat.

    A screenshot from the video of Franklin being fed
    The video is very sweet (Picture: Caters News)

    Nichole said: ‘My granddad Franklin lives on his own but he’s unable to look after himself, so we go to his house every day.

    ‘Colton always wants to come with me and he will usually help feed him once a day.

    ‘He also helps him drinking water, pushes him around in his wheelchair and put his shoes on.

    ‘He just randomly wants to help and that makes me proud.

    ‘The fact that he is willing to do this at six years of age touches my heart.’

    This video is a sweet reminder to always look after our elders and family with the love and care that they’ve always given us.

    MORE: Kopparberg is selling rosé cider for £2.20 a bottle

    MORE: Bride gets diarrhoea from ‘health shakes’ and ruins £12,000 wedding dress


    young kid helps feed his great grandad with Alzheimers diseaseyoung kid helps feed his great grandad with Alzheimers disease

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    Close up of bride's broken leg next to an image of her on her wedding day with bridesmaids
    This bride’s leg broke in four places when she tripped during her hen do (Picture: SWNS)

    Hen dos are known for being wild but the debauchery doesn’t usually end in broken limbs.

    Unfortunately for bride-to-be Lula O’Neins, her bridal shower ended in hospital.

    Lula, from Somerset, was enjoying her Center Parcs holiday just eight weeks before the wedding when she tripped.

    The 24-year-old broke her leg in four places which resulted in it being ‘bent back the wrong way’.

    A quick-thinking bridesmaid then decided to take a bit of a gamble and snapped it into place, preventing the leg from losing its blood supply.

    Thankfully it worked and Lula didn’t need to have the limb amputated, which would’ve been the case had it been left untreated.

    Two months later the bride was was able to hobble down the aisle to marry her partner, Alex, in a boot.

    She spent their honeymoon in Lake Como, Italy, on crutches.

    Lula O'Neins' with husband Alex on their wedding day
    Lula hopped down the aisle to marry Alex (Picture: SWNS)

    Lula underwent a series of operations and now has pins in her ankle and knee. The bone has been hollowed out with a rod put through it to help it heal.

    ‘The girls planned such a fun trip. It was supposed to be a relaxing break as planning the wedding had been pretty stressful,’ she said.

    ‘We had a great time and I wasn’t even drunk when I tripped over and my leg just went “snap”.

     Lula O'Neins on crutches during honeymoon
    She spent her Lake Como honeymoon in crutches (Picture: SWNS)

    Lula screamed out in agony, with her bridesmaids and sister running to her aid.

    They also sent a picture to the bride’s mum who is a nurse. But unfortunately, she was not on the trip.

    Bride's broken leg
    Ouch (Picture: SWNS)

    ‘I couldn’t get up. I was in so much pain. My leg was bent back the wrong way. It was all in the wrong place.

    ‘As we were waiting for [help] to show up, Gabrielle decided to push my leg back into place – thinking it might help, although she has no first aid training. It’s very lucky that she did.’

    .Lula O'Neins' broken leg in a cast
    Lukla tripped over and broke both bones – the tibia and fibula – in her leg each in two places and the limb was all bent out of shape (Picture: SWNS)

    Despite the accident Lula’s injury wasn’t considered an emergency because there was no blood, so she endured a six-hour wait for the ambulance.

    When she had the initial operation, metal pins were inserted into her ankle and knee, and the bone was hollowed out to put a rod through it – to keep it straight and help it heal.

    X-Ray of Lula O'Neins' broken leg.
    Metal pins were added in her leg to straighten it out (Picture: SWNS)

    The bride squad decided not to tell groom Alex but as Lula prepped for surgery, he was able to join his wife-to-be.

    The couple considered postponing their wedding but having paid for it all, decided to go ahead.

    Lula O'Neins, 24 (bride) wearing her foot restraint at her wedding in Italy
    Lukcily, the untrained bridesmaid’s gamble paid off as Lula didn’t need to have her leg amputated (Picture: SWNS)

    Just a few weeks later, when the wedding day rolled around, Lula was confident in her supportive boot.

    She said: ‘I was sad I wasn’t able to wear the beautiful heels I’d chosen, but I knew I’d be comfier in flats anyway.

    EMBARGO 2PM TODAY WEDNESDAY AUGUST. Lula O'Neins, 24 (bride) wearing her foot restraint at her wedding in Italy. See SWNS copy SWOCbride; A bride-to-be who broke her leg in four places on her hen do almost had to have the limb amputated - but was saved by her quick-thinking bridesmaid. Lula O'Neins, 24, was letting her hair down at Centre Parcs just eight weeks before her wedding when disaster struck. She tripped over and broke both bones - the tibia and fibula - in her leg each in two places and the limb was all bent out of shape.
    She wore a boot on her wedding day but she didn’t mind so much (Picture: SWNS)

    ‘Luckily, my long dress covered my boot so guests couldn’t see it as I hobbled down the aisle.

    ‘I ditched my crutches to limp towards Alex and say our vows and in that moment nothing else mattered.

    ‘I spent the rest of the day on cloud nine – not caring about my dodgy leg.’

    As a thank you, Lula entered Gabrielle in a best bridesmaid competition and she actually won.

    MORE: Should you ask your bridesmaid to pay for their own dress for your wedding day?

    MORE: Bride charges wedding guest £250 to get her makeup done – and she wasn’t even a bridesmaid

    MORE: How to cut down the costs of being a bridesmaid


    Bride breaks leg before weddingBride breaks leg before wedding

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    Picture of man who suffered third-degree burns over 60% of his body in a factory he worked at after fleeing to Malaysia
    This man with suffered third-degree burns over 60% of his body in a factory he worked at after fleeing to Malaysia(Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)

    The Rohingya people are a displaced group from the Rakhine state in Myanmar.

    The Muslim minority has been forced out of their homes and migrate to nearby lands.

    Black and white photos showing the plight of the group are shared by Saiful Huq Omi in his book 136 – I Am Rohingya, published by Schilt Publishing.

    The striking images show a man with who suffered third-degree burns over 60% of his body in a factory he worked at after fleeing to Malaysia.

    You can also see a Rohingya worker in an ice factory in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh where many have fled to.

    The Rohingyas wait in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, escaping from the 2017 Rohingya persecution in Myanmar
    The Rohingyas arrive in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, escaping from the 2017 Rohingya persecution in Myanmar (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)

    Another subject is a man who has recurring nightmares after enduring a treacherous month-long journey being smuggled into a camp in Thailand and from there, Malaysia.

    Other images show Rohingya fishermen in Bangladesh, as they are so desperate for work they will go to sea all year round despite the conditions.

    A family who had been smuggled into Bangladesh are also pictured but were sadly deported back to Myanmar the morning after the photo was taken.

    A child plays on a makeshift swing
    Those born in the country their parents have fled to are ‘children of nowhere’ (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)

    The Rohingyans have been a stateless community for decades as they are not considered legal citizens of any state.

    The title of this book, 136, refers to the Myanmar government officially declaring only 135 ethnic groups in Myanmar, not including Rohingyas.

    In 1982 the Burmese government revoked the citizenship of Rohingya people leaving them stateless.

    Saiful Huq Omi started to document the lives of the Rohingyas almost a decade ago and has showcased their stories in different parts of the world.

    Men pushing a boat in the ocean
    Men have had to take illegal fishing jobs in Bangladesh as they can’t legally work there (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)

    ‘136, I am Rohingya honours the mission of strengthening the identity of the community that is being threatened and adds to its collective memory, shows its traditions, raises awareness, tells stories of abuse and tragedies,’ said Saiful.

    ‘Ultimately, it shows an incredible commitment to the fight of these people and a level of humanity, so necessary in these times of turbulence.

    You can purchase a copy of 136, I Am Rohingya online.

    Shadowy figure of man in black and white
    This man was deported back to Myanmar a day after these photos were taken (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)
    Saiful Huq Omi 136 ? I Am Rohingya Published by Schilt Publishing, March 2018 Image credits: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing Please mention: 136 ? I Am Rohingya by Saiful Huq Omi is published by Schilt Publishing, available in stores and online for ?45. Signed copies are available only here: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/136-i-am-rohingya-signed If online, please use the link to our website: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/new-releases/136-i-am-rohingya.
    Shamlapur, a locality isolated from the Bangladeshi mainland, has been home to Rohingya refugees for many years (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)
    A Rohingya worker in an ice factory in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh
    A Rohingya worker in an ice factory in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)
    Saiful Huq Omi 136 ? I Am Rohingya Published by Schilt Publishing, March 2018 Image credits: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing Please mention: 136 ? I Am Rohingya by Saiful Huq Omi is published by Schilt Publishing, available in stores and online for ?45. Signed copies are available only here: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/136-i-am-rohingya-signed If online, please use the link to our website: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/new-releases/136-i-am-rohingya.
    Widow Rahima Khatun fled to the UK where she became sick (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)
    Children standing under the rain in makeshift camp
    When it rains landslides may engulf the homes of the refugees, but the Rohingyas have no place else to go (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)
    Saiful Huq Omi 136 ? I Am Rohingya Published by Schilt Publishing, March 2018 Image credits: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing Please mention: 136 ? I Am Rohingya by Saiful Huq Omi is published by Schilt Publishing, available in stores and online for ?45. Signed copies are available only here: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/136-i-am-rohingya-signed If online, please use the link to our website: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/new-releases/136-i-am-rohingya.
    Families looking to flee must find a smuggler to come and take them to a safe house (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)
    Saiful Huq Omi 136 ? I Am Rohingya Published by Schilt Publishing, March 2018 Image credits: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing Please mention: 136 ? I Am Rohingya by Saiful Huq Omi is published by Schilt Publishing, available in stores and online for ?45. Signed copies are available only here: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/136-i-am-rohingya-signed If online, please use the link to our website: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/new-releases/136-i-am-rohingya.
    Those being smuggled to another country may be arrested at the border if found (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)
    Saiful Huq Omi 136 ? I Am Rohingya Published by Schilt Publishing, March 2018 Image credits: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing Please mention: 136 ? I Am Rohingya by Saiful Huq Omi is published by Schilt Publishing, available in stores and online for ?45. Signed copies are available only here: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/136-i-am-rohingya-signed If online, please use the link to our website: www.schiltpublishing.com/shop/books/new-releases/136-i-am-rohingya.
    Families have been torn apart (Picture: Saiful Huq Omi/Schilt Publishing)

    MORE: Photos show exactly how much sunscreen you should be using

    MORE: Stunning photos show the beauty of people with a rare and untreatable skin condition

    MORE: Stunning black and white photos show the studio of a 1950s tattoo artist


    136 ? I Am Rohingya136 ? I Am Rohingya

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    Illustration of two men swimming - from above
    Swimming is a great example of a low-intensity workout. (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    We’ve all heard of high-intensity interval training. It’s all the rage at the moment.

    Overwhelmingly quick, brutal, punishing classes that have you working explosively and using every muscle group in your body.

    While the benefits of HIIT are widely recorded, it’s also good to note that it doesn’t work for everyone. And too much high-intensity exercise can actually put pressure on your joints and leave you at risk of injury.

    That’s why it’s a great idea to mix things up and try a low-intensity workout.

    Low-intensity, or steady state workouts are perfect for people who are coming back from injury, older people or if you’re looking for an active way to recover on your day off.

    Low-intensity workouts aren’t cheating – far from it, they actually have loads of beneficial effects of your fitness, strength and over health.

    The benefits of low-intensity exercise

    It can be more enjoyable

    If the thought of punishing your body with endless burpies makes you feel queasy, low-intensity fitness could be the answer.

    One of the biggest motivating factors to get you to exercise consistently is enjoyment – so if you don’t enjoy high intensity workouts, you’re less likely to go back, simple.

    It is easier on your joints 

    Throwing yourself around the gym might be great for your heart, but it’s no so kind on your knees.

    If you suffer with joint problems or recurring injuries, slower, controlled fitness might be the best way to protect yourself.

    Improves balance and stability

    Taking the speed down a notch means every move you complete needs to be controlled and steady. For that, you need great balance.

    Regularly working on your core and slower movements with weights will help you build on your stability.

    Illustration of man holding his knee in pain
    Give your joints a break and try something gentler. (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    To prove that low-intensity workouts aren’t just a cop-out for people who don’t want to get sweaty, we asked Jason Bristow, group exercise manager at Virgin Active to tell us more about why it can be brilliant.

    ‘Low intensity workouts are exercises that are little to no impact but they still raise the heart rate,’ Jason tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘They are great for people who are starting to get into exercise or are coming back from injury – and also for those who are keen for a rest day and want to complement their higher intensity workouts.

    ‘Low intensity workouts can be accessed anywhere and at any time with little need for equipment or a large amount of expense.

    ‘There are many benefits from doing low intensity workouts, but the most significant one is a gradual increase in strength and muscular endurance without putting stress on the joints. There has also been studies that prove that at a low intensity, you could burn up to 20% more when compared to HIIT training.

    ‘If you are a regular gym goer, it is sometimes a good idea to slow things down but still get a great sweat on – this will reduce your risk of injury while keeping your fitness up. It will also aid your muscles in recovery after a more intense session.

    ‘Great examples of low intensity workouts include walking, cycling and even swimming.

    ‘If you wanted a low intensity interval work out in a gym, a long walk on a treadmill at a steady pace followed by a low resistance cycle on a watt bike.

    ‘As long as your heart rate does not raise too high then this will count as LISS –  this of course all depends on your fitness level and where you are in your fitness journey.’

    Walking on the treadmill – we definitely like the sound of that.

    I am Team GB

    Toyota has teamed up with Team GB to re-launch the hugely successful participation campaign ‘I am Team GB’.

    Inspired by the achievements of Team GB athletes and the amazing efforts of local community heroes, Team GB has created ‘The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day’, which will take place on the 24thAugust.

    Over the weekend, there will be hundreds of free and fun activities across the country, put on by an army of volunteers; the ‘I am Team GB Games Makers’.

    To Join the Team and be part of The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day sign up at: www.IAmTeamGB.com


    Swimming diarySwimming diary

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    You think planking is hard? Try this killer variation that targets you glutes as well as your core.

    Plank leg raises are all about stability – the plank becomes even harder when you’ve got one leg off the ground, and the burn in your bum is an added benefit.

    Our daily challenges are perfect to try at home, at the gym or in the park. They are designed to get you moving every day.

    Throughout this Staying Active summer series, fitness experts Elia and Amanda – both qualified instructors at Flykick – will be on hand to show you how to do each challenge and give you their top tips.

    Check back every day to see what the next challenge is – you could even film your progress to make a record of how far you’ve come.

    The aim is to be active every day for six weeks over summer. Today’s challenge will test different muscle groups and help to improve your muscle performance.

    These daily challenges can be done on their own, or you can include them in larger workout – it’s totally up to you. As long as you’re moving, that’s what matters.

    Young woman doing a plank with one raised leg on a exercise mat
    Try to keep your hips down as you lift each leg. (Picture: Getty)

    We know doing the same fitness routine every week can get really tedious, trying a new challenge every day will keep your fitness fresh and fun – and you might even learn some new moves.

    How to do plank leg lifts

    Start in a plank position with your arms bent and your weight in your forearms.

    Engage your core and keep your body straight all the way from your head down to your heels.

    Now raise your right leg and hold that position for one second. As you raise, try to keep your hips down and the rest of your body in a straight line.

    Lower your right leg and raise your left leg. Continue alternating back and forth.

    I am Team GB

    Toyota has teamed up with Team GB to re-launch the hugely successful participation campaign ‘I am Team GB’.

    Inspired by the achievements of Team GB athletes and the amazing efforts of local community heroes, Team GB has created ‘The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day’, which will take place on the 24thAugust.

    Over the weekend, there will be hundreds of free and fun activities across the country, put on by an army of volunteers; the ‘I am Team GB Games Makers’.

    To Join the Team and be part of The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day sign up at: www.IAmTeamGB.com


    Young woman doing a plank on a exercise matYoung woman doing a plank on a exercise mat

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    Falling in love is supposed to be one of the happiest times in a person’s life. Butterflies flapping in your stomach too loudly to ignore and the promise of great things to come.

    But, when I fell in love, I lost most of my friends and I was branded a bitch for following my feelings. Eighteen years later I have no regrets but the feeling of being judged unfairly still stings.

    I’d been dating Chris* for seven years. It was my first proper relationship, and it had been both good and bad.

    But it was real and intense and my whole world – including mates – were intertwined with him. His friends were my friends. But it was one of his university mates who turned out to be life-changing.

    I had always got on with Max*. We’d had a connection from day one. We got on and laughed lots. We were just friends, but I always knew he’d make a good boyfriend.

    Helen Fear
    I’d been dating Chris* for seven years. It was my first proper relationship, and it had been both good and bad (Picture: Jerry Syder/Metro.co.uk)

    I once even tried to get him together with one of my friends, so convinced I was that he was ‘a good catch’.

    After much soul-searching, my heart told me that Chris wasn’t the right person for me in the long-term and I ended it. I still loved him and we had so much history together, but I knew the relationship wasn’t perfect.

    Growing up with unhappily married parents, I always wanted to do better. I didn’t want to compromise as they had. I would rather be alone, than wondering if the grass was greener…

    Breaking up with Chris was probably one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do. Although it made things difficult in the friendship group, I think they all believed we’d get back together one day.

    But I surprised myself when I started thinking about how much I was going to miss Max, Chris’ best friend. Over time, this feeling intensified and I began to realise maybe my attraction to him was something more than friendship.

    About six months later I emailed him. I knew it was wrong. I knew Chris would be so hurt if he found out. But I couldn’t help myself – it sounds like such a cliché, but I was drawn to him like a magnet.

     Helen Fear
    It sounds like such a cliché, but I was drawn to him like a magnet (Picture: Jerry Syder/Metro.co.uk)

    Still telling myself it was as friends, we met up. But the chemistry was undeniable. We admitted we’d both missed each other and eventually kissed.

    For months we would meet, making sure we knew what we were doing. If we were going to do this, we had to be certain.

    We began dating behind everyone’s backs. We tried to end it, stop seeing each other. But we were drawn to each other again and again. Until we couldn’t deny it anymore.

    We were in love, and we had to tell Chris.

    We decided Max should break the news over a drink. Understandably, Chris was angry and upset and he stormed out of the pub without looking back.

    Immediately, our network turned their backs on us. And I don’t blame them. They sided with Chris. Everyone assumed they’d been an overlap (there hadn’t).

    I was called a bitch by his friends. Another said they ‘thought less of me’. That was harsh. I pride myself on my moral compass, but I DID put myself first, no matter what the consequences were for others.

    I was 26 and had lost nearly all my friends. As had Max. It was brutal. I played raging music and sobbed my heart out.

    I had hurt someone I loved and had been found guilty of being a bitch by those who judged me.

    Helen Fear
    I was 26 and had lost nearly all my friends. As had Max. It was brutal (Picture: Jerry Syder/Metro.co.uk)

    Was I bitch for falling in love with someone? Should I have ignored my feelings for the sake of someone else? Did people have the right to judge me?

    People jump to assumptions when you say you fell for your ex-boyfriend’s best friend. It doesn’t sound good, does it? But I was young and I followed my heart.

    All I could do was make damn sure I knew Max and I were real. And we were.

    Eighteen years later, we are still together. Married. With two beautiful daughters.

    There will always be a shadow over how we got together and awkwardness when we’re asked how we met. I try to laugh about it now.

    I’ve been called a bitch since. I’m female, outspoken and don’t mince my words. It’s a term people use to describe a woman who isn’t afraid of going for what she wants.

    To be labelled a ‘bitch’ is one of the most offensive things you can throw at a woman – it’s a nasty word originating from ‘dog on heat’ when a woman had a high sexual desire. Yet another way of demeaning women.

    Can you think of a similar male equivalent?

    Of course, now the word ‘bitch’ means any woman who is strong or assertive. Just ask Hillary Clinton.

    I went for the man I loved and survived the fallout. If that makes me a bitch, then so be it.

    *Names have been changed

    Labels

    Labels is an exclusive series that hears from individuals who have been labelled – whether that be by society, a job title, or a diagnosis. Throughout the project, writers will share how having these words ascribed to them shaped their identity  positively or negatively  and what the label means to them.

    If you would like to get involved please email jess.austin@metro.co.uk

    MORE: My Label and Me: Don’t call me an expat, I’m an immigrant

    MORE: My Label and Me: I’m mixed-race and everyone has an opinion about me

    MORE: My Label and Me: I’m HIV positive and that doesn’t make me ‘reckless’ or ‘risky’


    Helen Fear LabelsHelen Fear Labels

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    Georgia Deguara with a hand balancing on her head
    ‘We unapologetically fill the room and present a complete celebration of strong women.’ (Picture: Karla Scott)

    The circus might conjure up images of burly strong men, ringmasters in top hats and dainty acrobats in frilly outfits.

    But this all-female circus troupe is bringing something entirely different to the table.

    YUCK Circus is subverting gender norms through flips, tricks and frank conversations in their electrifying modern take on the classic art form.

    We asked Georgia Deguara, director of YUCK Circus, why it’s so important to bring female perspectives into this space – and how on earth she got into circus in the first place.

    ‘Lucky for me, growing up there was a local circus down the road from my house,’ Georgia tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘It was a matter of being bored one night after dinner and deciding to give it a go.

    Georgia Deguara stands on stage in a skimpy outfit holding a hoop
    (Picture: Jackie Uhd)

    ‘Skip forward a decade – I’ve got my degree in Circus Arts, and direct a winner of an all-female company.’

    Who knew you could get a degree in Circus Arts? I bet you’re regretting that dry Business Studies decision now.

    For Georgia, circus has always been more than a hobby. It is a way of life, and it is the people that make it.

    ‘I believe circus has a community aspect and that is what pulled me in,’ she explains.

    ‘Having an artform to express yourself is one thing; it’s a whole other ball game when your peers and mentors celebrate you and your work. Plus, who wouldn’t want to do flips for a living?

    The YUCK Circus troupe posing in a human pyramid
    ‘Who wouldn’t want to do flips for a living?’ (Picture: Samantha Martin)

    ‘Usually when punters think of the word “circus” they think clowns, animals, and big tops.

    ‘YUCK differs from this idea as we use our lady acrobats to hybridise comedy, storytelling, groovy dancing, with our circus skills to carry a social message.

    ‘Similar to traditional circus, our cohort celebrates individuality and a family-like support, which is essential when making strong work.’

    It is still groundbreaking to see only women in a circus performance – and Georgia uses this uniqueness as a selling point for the show. But it hasn’t been easy to forge a space for themselves.

    ‘To no fault of its own, some circus skills are taught male-female, limiting the performing roles of a circus lady,’ says Georgia.

    ‘This stigma has been challenged greatly throughout the life of “modern” circus, and we’ve pushed it even further with such a large cast.

    ‘Our show is strengthened by our numbers, we unapologetically fill the room and present a complete celebration of strong women. This is where YUCK finds its power.

    ‘We’re a bunch of rip-roaring chicks from Down Under, presenting ourselves authentically – no make up, cracking great one-liners, and having a bloody good time.

    ‘We’re displaying our version of femininity and combining it with some sick tricks. Performing traditionally male acts, combining it with glitter, and bringing it home with a strong social commentary.’

    Georgia Deguara swings from a giant chair hanging above the stage
    (Picture: Aaron Walker)

    The YUCK troupe, who hail from Australia, are all about directness. They don’t shy away from taboo topics – and they use mesmerising stunts to open up awkward conversations.

    ‘Apart from the fact we can throw each other across the stage, and stack 3 high, us girls have found strength with our voices.

    ‘We break down barriers of uncomfortable conversation, showing the humour of the trials and tribulations of what it’s like to be a young woman.

    ‘We cover topics of menstruation, sexting, binge drinking, and cat calls. But don’t get us wrong, this isn’t a girls-only, no-boys-allowed show.

    ‘Through educating a vast and differing audience demographic, we can empower others to drop the shame and speak their truth.’

    Circus life sounds incredible. No two days are the same and Georgia is surrounded by strong, empowering women who physically and metaphorically lift her up.

    ‘I can’t begin to articulate the countless amazing show’s we’ve had, or the monstrous positive response from our audience,’ she tells us.

    ‘If I had to pick a favourite child, well there are two.

    ‘The first was a Tuesday Night FRINGEWORLD performance where the standing ovation was so enormous that it blocked out all the lights on stage, and us girls stood there being clapped at in the dark.

    ‘The second highlight has to be an amazing write-up from Liz Newell announcing that: “This damn show made me laugh so hard my face hurt and made me feel like I could fight a bear (and possibly win).”

    ‘All in all, I love working and touring the globe with my powerhouse cast. We have such a good time.’

    YUCK Circus will be performing at Underbelly’s Circus Hub on The Meadows as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, from 3rd – 24th Aug.

    I am Team GB

    Toyota has teamed up with Team GB to re-launch the hugely successful participation campaign ‘I am Team GB’.

    Inspired by the achievements of Team GB athletes and the amazing efforts of local community heroes, Team GB has created ‘The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day’, which will take place on the 24thAugust.

    Over the weekend, there will be hundreds of free and fun activities across the country, put on by an army of volunteers; the ‘I am Team GB Games Makers’.

    To Join the Team and be part of The Nation’s Biggest Sports Day sign up at: www.IAmTeamGB.com


    5. Karla Scott, Georgia Deguara, Brooke Duckworth, Jessica Smart, Abbie Madden, Emily Mcdonagh, Ella Norton. Photo by Samantha Martin-57705. Karla Scott, Georgia Deguara, Brooke Duckworth, Jessica Smart, Abbie Madden, Emily Mcdonagh, Ella Norton. Photo by Samantha Martin-5770

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    Illustration of two people lying in bed together
    Are you lying awake at night, kept up by negative thoughts? Same (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Look, if you’re a bit of a pessimist, this isn’t going to make you feel any better.

    Optimists tend to get better sleep than negative thinkers, suggests a new study.

    That would be handy to know… if it were that easy to just change our very nature and become optimistic for the sake of our snoozing.

    Researchers at the University of Illinois surveyed more than 3,500 people between the ages of 32 and 51, asking them to rate how much they agreed with positive statements such as ‘I’m always optimistic about my future’ and negative ones like ‘I hardly ever expect things to go my way’.

    Scores ranged from six (least optimistic) to 30 (most optimistic).

    Researchers then looked at participants’ sleep quality and duration, as well as assessing their symptoms of insomnia and how tricky they found it to drift off.

    Yep, those who scored high on the optimism test tended to have better quality sleep.

    Those with higher levels of optimism were more likely to get between six to nine hours of sleep each night, were less likely to have symptoms of insomnia, and were less sleepy during the day. Those lucky sods.

    So optimists get better sleep than pessimists, that much we know. What’s not entirely clear is why, but there are a few theories.

    Being a positive person might make it easier to deal with stress, which we know is a major factor in sleep quality.

    Think about it like this – a negative person might spend hours tossing and turning, worrying about all the bad things that could happen, while a positive person can dismiss fears and worries with optimistic thinking, thus allowing them to easily drift off and stay asleep once they have.

    The lead researcher of the study, Rosalba Hernandez, said: ‘Optimists are more likely to engage in active problem-focused coping and to interpret stressful events in more positive ways, reducing worry and ruminative thoughts when they’re falling asleep and throughout their sleep cycle.’

    So if you’re struggling with sleep, just ditch your stress and think positive. Easier said than done.

    MORE: Drinking booze or smoking before bed will ruin your sleep more than coffee, says study

    MORE: Five exercises that can help you sleep better


    How to stop saying sorryHow to stop saying sorry

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