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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    (Picture: Firebox)

    You can now spread pornstar martini on your toast and we don’t think there’s any better way to start the day.

    Firebox has just started selling a passionfruit and vodka marmalade, for those who fancy an extra kick at breakfast time.

    The marmalade does actually include real vodka. It’s not just a flavouring.

    The product description says: ‘Pop the lid off and help yourself to a guilty fingerful of tropical decadence.

    ‘Each sinful spoonful contains real ripe passion fruit puree, balanced out with juicy oranges and tart citrus, and straddled by a vicious twist of vodka.

    ‘Spread it, drink it, bake with it, lick it, spoon it, swallow it, sensually smear it over your lover*… hey, there’s a reason it’s called passionfruit!’

    Currently, the award winning marmalade is selling for £9.99, alongside some other boozy spreads – including gin marmalade, which ‘goes very well in a cucumber sandwich’.

    You Can Now Get Spreadable Pornstar Martini For The Best Brekkie Ever
    (Picture: Firebox)

    There’s also beer spread, which contains 40% beer and ‘possesses a sticky yet smooth texture and an irresistible hoppy scent.’

    Finally, there’s also spreadable whisky, which is rich and malty, and perfect on toast, or with Roquefort cheese and crackers.

    Like the passionfruit martini, these alcoholic spreads are also £9.99 each – and so if you fancy buying them all, they’ll make the perfect gift for anyone who wants to get boozy in the morning.

    MORE: 22-year-old couple foster girl just seven years younger than them

    MORE: Walt Disney World’s All Star Sports Resort is selling scoops of cookie dough


    You Can Now Get Spreadable Pornstar Martini For The Best Brekkie EverYou Can Now Get Spreadable Pornstar Martini For The Best Brekkie EverhattiegladwellmetroYou Can Now Get Spreadable Pornstar Martini For The Best Brekkie EverYou Can Now Get Spreadable Pornstar Martini For The Best Brekkie EverYou Can Now Get Spreadable Pornstar Martini For The Best Brekkie EverhattiegladwellmetroYou Can Now Get Spreadable Pornstar Martini For The Best Brekkie Ever

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    Sarah Schmid, from Halle, Germany, has six children and gave birth to all of them outside a hospital.

    After she had her first child with the help of a midwife, she had the rest of her children unassisted – one of them was even born in a Swedish forest.

    She decided to give birth to her six child at home, in their back garden, and uploaded the video on YouTube.

    Warning: The video below includes nudity and graphic footage of childbirth. It’s not safe for work or for sensitive viewers. 

    After practicing medicine for some time and seeing babies delivered, she became inspired to try free-birthing.

    ‘I watched people giving birth in a hospital and I thought, “I can’t do this. It isn’t relaxing”,’ she told The Sun.

    ‘It made me realise I wanted to give birth without intervention.’

    Sarah wanted to be completely alone so husband Tim was not around during the birth to son Kiran. By the time she had her second child, Sarah felt she’d become a birth expert and chose to do it alone in a forest in Sweden where they lived.

    Tim arrived four hours after Sarah gave birth to take pictures and make sure the duo were okay.

    ‘I found it stressful in hospital,’ explained Sarah. ‘I found the forest very relaxing, so I thought it was the best place for me to have my baby.

    ‘I didn’t mind Tim not being there. I knew he had fears about the birth – especially because it was unassisted. But I felt I had to deal with my own fears first.

    The couple then took their child home without going to the hospital.

    The YouTube video has over 833,043 views and comments have been turned off – for obvious reasons.

    MORE: No girl should be dying for virginity – as a FGM survivor, I understand the brutality too well

    MORE: You can now use your placenta to plant a tree

    MORE: Men, you can now pay to experience the pain of labour


    Woman films herself giving birth by herself in her back gardenWoman films herself giving birth by herself in her back gardenfaimabakar1Woman films herself giving birth by herself in her back gardenWoman films herself giving birth by herself in her back gardenfaimabakar1

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    Skydiving, like marriage, is not for the faint-hearted. Going up on a hot balloon might also make you shudder.

    One couple unafraid of all three decided to do it all at once.

    Patrick Russell, 38, and Melanie Ilemsky, 36, decided to have an airborne wedding due to their shared love of skydiving.

    It makes sense, seeing as the pair met at a skydiving centre in New York.

    The couple jump out of the hot air balloon after getting married. This amazing footage shows the moment an adrenaline-junkie couple skydived from a hot air balloon after tying the knot - in front of guests packed into the basket. See story SWJUMP. Patrick Russell, 38, and Melanie Ilemsky, 36, decided to have an airborne wedding due to their shared love of skydiving. The couple met at a skydive drop zone in New York and knew each other for two years before they got married, on their one-year anniversary. They invited only a few close friends and family as only ten people could fit in the hot air balloon. Melanie had her dress, which cost $20 from Amazon, especially adapted to incorporate her skydiving rig. Her mother, Tetiana Cymbal, was ordained so she could carry out the intimate ceremony - which was also the first time she had been in a hot air balloon.
    (Picture: George Grove/SWNS)

    The vows took place in a hot air balloon which could only fit ten people so the wedding had to be a very small one.

    Melanie’s mum Tetiana had to double as the marriage officiator and was ordained so she could carry out the intimate ceremony – which was also the first time she had been in a hot air balloon.

    Patrick Russell, 38, and Melanie Ilemsky, 36, jump out of the hot air balloon after getting married. This amazing footage shows the moment an adrenaline-junkie couple skydived from a hot air balloon after tying the knot - in front of guests packed into the basket. See story SWJUMP. Patrick Russell, 38, and Melanie Ilemsky, 36, decided to have an airborne wedding due to their shared love of skydiving. The couple met at a skydive drop zone in New York and knew each other for two years before they got married, on their one-year anniversary. They invited only a few close friends and family as only ten people could fit in the hot air balloon. Melanie had her dress, which cost $20 from Amazon, especially adapted to incorporate her skydiving rig. Her mother, Tetiana Cymbal, was ordained so she could carry out the intimate ceremony - which was also the first time she had been in a hot air balloon.
    (Picture: George Grove/SWNS)

    Diving lover and academic advisor Melanie made sure her dress looked and fitted the part, purchasing it from Amazon for $20 (£15.21) which was specially adapted to incorporate her skydiving rig.

    ‘You don’t want any loose fabric or to be pulling the wrong thing,’ she explained.

    ‘The dress was so short that I had to wear a pair of shorts beneath it. It wasn’t a dress I would choose for a regular ceremony.

    ‘My mother was pressuring me to come up with a back up but I took a risk and it worked out.’

    High rise wedding.... This amazing footage shows the moment an adrenaline-junkie couple skydived from a hot air balloon after tying the knot - in front of guests packed into the basket. See story SWJUMP. Patrick Russell, 38, and Melanie Ilemsky, 36, decided to have an airborne wedding due to their shared love of skydiving. The couple met at a skydive drop zone in New York and knew each other for two years before they got married, on their one-year anniversary. They invited only a few close friends and family as only ten people could fit in the hot air balloon. Melanie had her dress, which cost $20 from Amazon, especially adapted to incorporate her skydiving rig. Her mother, Tetiana Cymbal, was ordained so she could carry out the intimate ceremony - which was also the first time she had been in a hot air balloon.
    (Picture: George Grove/SWNS)

    Although it all worked out, the couple did worry the weather was going to act up on their big day.

    They had to travel to Pensylvania to find a hot air balloon big enough to accomodate ten people as most usualy carry six.

    Melanie also added that the adrenaline pumping through the both of them made it difficult to remember their vows.

    The wedding party. This amazing footage shows the moment an adrenaline-junkie couple skydived from a hot air balloon after tying the knot - in front of guests packed into the basket. See story SWJUMP. Patrick Russell, 38, and Melanie Ilemsky, 36, decided to have an airborne wedding due to their shared love of skydiving. The couple met at a skydive drop zone in New York and knew each other for two years before they got married, on their one-year anniversary. They invited only a few close friends and family as only ten people could fit in the hot air balloon. Melanie had her dress, which cost $20 from Amazon, especially adapted to incorporate her skydiving rig. Her mother, Tetiana Cymbal, was ordained so she could carry out the intimate ceremony - which was also the first time she had been in a hot air balloon.
    (Picture: George Grove/SWNS)

    Patrick, who is originally from County Cork, Ireland, revealed they’d initially considered jumping out of a plane but thought it would be too loud so ended up going with a balloon.

    ‘Originally we knew we didn’t want a very big wedding, we just wanted an intimate one with a few family and friends,’ he said.

    During the exchanging of the rings, Melanie’s brother Andrew performed Chasing Cars by Snow Patrol on his guitar.

    It sounds like something straight out of a movie.

    MORE: Men, you can now pay to experience the pain of labour

    MORE: Let’s talk about being the one before the one


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    (Picture: SWNS)

    A student whose eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before he was finally diagnosed with a rare and life-threatening form of cancer.

    21-year-old Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medics that there was nothing wrong with him after his eyes randomly started watering.

    He said it was not until his fourth appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed.

    Jack had first noticed something was wrong while on holiday in Mexico. His eye began watering and he felt a pain near his nose.

    Jack Morgan pictured as he began treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.
    Jack Morgan pictured as he began treatment for cancer (Picture: Jack Morgan/SWNS)

    After returning home, he saw a consultant in Bristol who assured him it was nothing to worry about.

    Unconvinced, Jack decided to travel to London where he saw three more doctors who all said the same.

    He then went to see a fourth paid specialist where the cancer was identified instantly and within a week he had started treatment.

    ‘I knew my body and I knew something wasn’t right,’ said Jack.

    Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.
    (Picture: Jack Morgan/SWNS)

    ‘I never wanted to use the word cancer. I kept saying “I’m not well” or I’m going to beat “it” but I couldn’t say cancer at the start.

    ‘The problem is it had no defining characteristics. The only noticeable thing was my leaking tear duct.’

    A scan revealed the Bristol University student had Stage 3 undifferentiated carcinoma – a rare form of cancer

    Jack underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and is now cancer free.

    Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.
    (Picture: Jack Morgan/SWNS)

    During his treatment, he searched online and realised there was a huge community of people who wanted to share their experience of battling cancer.

    That’s when he came up with the idea for an app, called Cnected, which is dedicated to people with cancer and care givers.

    The app is free to download and hundreds of people have already signed up.

    He said: ‘Over the past few months, through my Instagram page I connected with many cancer patients, survivors and family members of patients.

    ‘I realised how powerful and beneficial social media can be, so I decided to set up a dedicated platform for the cancer community.

    ‘I wanted to get people talking and for them not to shy away from telling their stories.

    Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.
    (Picture: Jack Morgan/SWNS)

    ‘I know a lot of people can be embarrassed as you’re looking and feeling your absolute worst. You have no hair, you’re pale.

    ‘It’s also for people living with the aftermath of it all. It’s a lot like PDSD because you’ve been through a near death experience.

    ‘The more organisations, survivors, patients, carers, family members and friends I bring together the greater the benefit for us all.’

    Children with Cancer and Bowel & Cancer is supporting the new app, Jason Rigby, who works as the head of fundraising for the charity, said: ‘A diagnosis of cancer is a life-changing experience.

    ‘Living with this diagnosis for the individual, their family, friends and colleagues is one of the hardest things anyone will ever have to do.

    ‘Joining a community of people who, from experience, know what this is like could make such a difference to people’s wellbeing while dealing with the disease.

    ‘We hope that Cnected will prove to be a vital resource for anyone diagnosed with cancer, their loved ones, friends and colleagues.’

    MORE: Meet the people getting off on breastfeeding their partners

    MORE: What I Rent: Alex, Jess and Tash, £1,800 for a three bedroom flat in Blackheath


    A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancerA student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancerhattiegladwellmetroJack Morgan pictured as he began treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancerA student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancerhattiegladwellmetroJack Morgan pictured as he began treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.Jack Morgan pictured during treatment for cancer. See SWNS story SWCANCER; A student who eyes kept watering says he saw four private doctors before the symptoms were diagnosed - as a rare and life-threatening form of cancer. Jack Morgan said he was reassured by several medica there was nothing wrong with him after his eye bizarrely started watering. He said it was not until his fourth paid appointment that his deadly tumour was diagnosed. The 21-year-old said if he had not been so determined something was wrong with him, and sought several opinions from top consultants, in Bristol and London, then he would not be here today.

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    (Picture: SWNS)

    A woman who tried for a baby for seven years finally conceived thanks to her best friend.

    Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt.

    The couple, from Santa Clara, Utah, USA, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren’t comfortable using an anonymous donor.

    That’s when Chelsea’s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, came to save the day – by donating her own eggs to Chelsea.

    Tia said it was difficult to watch her friend’s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012.

    Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37.

    Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months.

    Chelsea Judd with Giselle on the day she was born. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.
    (Picture: SWNS)

    Tia started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month.

    Four embryos were created using Tia’s eggs and Steve’s sperm, and two were implanted in Chelsea’s uterus.

    Chelsea, a teacher, was so happy when she discovered she was pregnant 10 days later in September 2015.

    She said: ‘When we tried IVF for the first time and doctors told me at that point my egg count was low and that the quality of the eggs I had wasn’t very good.

    ‘Our doctors suggested we think about an egg donor or to pursue adoption.

    ‘That was devastating for me. I bawled for days.

    Gigi. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.
    (Picture: SWNS)

    ‘I felt bad because I always wanted to have the experience of pregnancy and have a family with my husband.

    ‘Although we explored egg donation, I knew I would want to be honest with my child and be able to tell them where they came from.

    ‘The fact that the egg donor remains anonymous wasn’t something I felt comfortable with.’

    Tia added: ‘I’m a mom and it broke my heart that Chelsea was struggling so much to have a family.

    ‘One day we were just at practice when she was telling us this and my sister said “You should just take one of Tia’s and we could have another beautiful brown baby” because we’re Polynesian.

    ‘I jokingly said ‘”Yeah, I’ll give you some of my eggs”.

    ‘But when I went home and thought about it, I really began to see it as more than a joke.

    Chelsea Judd with Gigi. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren???t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea???s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend???s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia???s eggs and Steve???s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.
    (Picture: Cambria Hauch Photography / SWNS)

    ‘At the time I had three beautiful boys and being a mother is the biggest blessing.

    ‘I really wanted that for Chelsea.

    ‘I spoke about it with my husband Andy and he is such a great guy. He said it was my decision to make.

    ‘A couple of days later I had a conversation with Chelsea and I told her that I would be willing to donate my eggs, if she wanted to accept them.’

    Chelsea and her teacher husband Steve welcomed 7lb 2oz Giselle in May 2016 and say they’ve never received a gift as precious as Tara’s selfless gesture.

    Chelsea said: ‘When she came out she had so much dark hair just as Tia predicted.

    ‘When I held her for the first time it was so amazing. I don’t think I will ever be able to describe it.

    ‘Tia came to see us the next morning and it was so special. We took photos which will always be so precious to me.’

    Tia added: ‘It is so funny that the eggs I donated turned out to be a girl because my house is full of boys.”

    Tia said that even though Giselle is biologically her daughter, there is no question that her mum is Chelsea.

    ‘I know she is mine, but really she’s not. Her mom is Chelsea,’ she said. ‘I love her, she’s the most beautiful little girl, but I am not her mom.

    Tia Stokes (egg doner) hold Gigi on the day she was born in May 2016. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015. Chelsea, and her teacher husband Steve welcomed 7lb 2oz Giselle (Gigi) in May 2016 and say they?ve never received a gift as precious as Tara?s selfless gesture.
    Tia with Giselle (Picture: SWNS)

    ‘It’s been such a fulfilling, amazing experience to have played a part in this. I’m just a small part of all of this.

    ‘I am the instrument that allowed my friend to have a family.’

    Currently, Chelsea is hoping to have another child to give Giselle a brother or sister.

    After Tia’s egg retrieval, doctors in Utah Fertility Clinic created four embryos, two of which will be implanted in Chelsea next month.

    Chelsea said: ‘We’re currently in the process of transferring our last two embryos so hopefully we can give Giselle a sibling.

    ‘Hopefully that will all go as planned next month.’

    Chelsea and Steve said they plan to tell Giselle about Tia, which is the main reason they did not opt for an anonymous donor.

    Chelsea said: ‘I plan to always be honest and open about Tia with Giselle.

    ‘For now, she’s aunty Tia but I’m so happy she will be able to understand and know who she is as she grows up.’

    Tia added: ‘I truly believe that our bodies are just instruments to hold our spirits.

    ‘Our spirits are already up in heaven waiting for us, so I merely just provided Chelsea’s daughter with the instruments she needed to be here.’

    MORE: 22-year-old couple foster girl just seven years younger than them

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    Woman gives birth to baby after seven year battle with infertility after best friend donates her eggsWoman gives birth to baby after seven year battle with infertility after best friend donates her eggshattiegladwellmetroChelsea Judd with Giselle on the day she was born. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.Gigi. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.Chelsea Judd with Gigi. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren???t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea???s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend???s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia???s eggs and Steve???s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.Tia Stokes (egg doner) hold Gigi on the day she was born in May 2016. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015. Chelsea, and her teacher husband Steve welcomed 7lb 2oz Giselle (Gigi) in May 2016 and say they?ve never received a gift as precious as Tara?s selfless gesture.Woman gives birth to baby after seven year battle with infertility after best friend donates her eggsWoman gives birth to baby after seven year battle with infertility after best friend donates her eggshattiegladwellmetroChelsea Judd with Giselle on the day she was born. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.Gigi. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.Chelsea Judd with Gigi. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren???t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea???s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend???s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia???s eggs and Steve???s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015.Tia Stokes (egg doner) hold Gigi on the day she was born in May 2016. See SWNS story NYEGG; A woman finally gave birth to her dream baby following a seven year battle with infertility after her best friend selflessly donated her eggs. Chelsea Judd, 32, and her husband Steve, 34, had been trying to start a family since 2011 before doctors discovered her eggs were low quality during their first IVF attempt in 2015. The couple, of Santa Clara, Utah, were advised to explore egg donation but they weren?t comfortable using an anonymous donor. Chelsea?s best friend Tia Stokes, 32, said it was difficult to watch her friend?s struggle to become a mother since the pair became friends in dance class in 2012. Mum-of-four Tia, who owns her own dance business, made the decision to offer her own eggs to help her pal conceive after discussing it with her husband Andy Stokes, 37. Tia and Andy, a high school football coach, are parents to four boys, Major, nine, Legend, eight, Mave, four, and Tazz, ten months. Selfless Tia, of Orem, Utah, started the process of preparing her eggs in Utah Fertility Clinic July 2015 before they were retrieved the following month. Four embryos were created using Tia?s eggs and Steve?s sperm, and two were subsequently implanted in Chelsea's uterus. Chelsea, a teacher, was overjoyed to discover she was pregnant for the first time ten days later in September 2015. Chelsea, and her teacher husband Steve welcomed 7lb 2oz Giselle (Gigi) in May 2016 and say they?ve never received a gift as precious as Tara?s selfless gesture.

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    School kids in classroom
    Children should learn about diversity (Picture: Getty)

    The Education Secretary, Damian Hinds, released plans last week to provide relationships education in primary schools, alongside relationships and sex education in secondary schools.

    The new guidance is intended to help schools prepare young people ‘for life in the modern world’ and will include discussions of LGBT issues, mental health and staying safe online for the first time.

    As a mum of two primary school children, I warmly welcome the planned focus on the virtues of kindness, generosity, honesty, and the importance of respecting others, including those who are different.

    Awareness and understanding of diversity is a critical life-skill in 2018. Schools can and do play an important role in helping children understand that different doesn’t equal wrong.

    Children benefit from learning that every person is unique, every individual has worth, everyone has a right to be treated with kindness, dignity and respect. That families are diverse, and that difference makes the world a beautiful and vibrant place.

    It’s also important because representation matters – children need to see that their identity, their family, their way of life, is visible at school – to help them feel that they belong.

    children playing
    (Picture: Getty)

    Research has shown that ‘belonging’ is a key factor in children’s wellbeing and ability to thrive.

    This representation is especially important for LGBT pupils, who may otherwise be given explicit or subtle messages that they do not belong. A lack of belonging is known to contribute to low self-worth, depression, and self-harm.

    My daughter, who is transgender, has been met with love, kindness and respect throughout her school and surrounding community. Her friends and classmates stand up for each other, regardless of difference. Her teachers welcome and celebrate diversity.

    But not all transgender children are so fortunate and the statistics from a 2017 survey of 3,713 secondary school age LGBT pupils are shocking.

    Stonewall found that 9% of trans youth have received death threats at school, 84% of trans youth have self-harmed and 45% have tried to take their own lives. Too often the UK is not a safe and welcoming place for trans children.

    Schools must be safe places for every child, where children learn to respect and love their friends regardless of difference. Where every child feels valued. Where every child feels that they belong.

    What’s more, LGBT people are an integral part of our society, they are our sisters, brothers, mums, dads, grandparents. They are our neighbours, our colleagues, our teachers. They are our children, our children’s classmates, our children’s friends.

    Creating a sense of belonging through representation is not hard or complex.

    It can be achieved through simple steps: ensuring school books represent the diversity in our children’s lives and in our communities; displaying posters that send a clear message that everyone is welcome; providing opportunities for children to talk about and celebrate difference.

    Research has shown that efforts to support and celebrate diversity in schools doesn’t just help children from minority groups – it benefits all children. Kindness, tolerance and respect builds resilience and improves mental health.

    The new guidance was shaped by a consultation earlier in the year, which found extensive public support for a focus on celebrating diversity and tackling discrimination.

    Young people who responded to the government consultation highlighted their expectation that education about gender identity and sexual orientation in Sex and Relationships Education ‘would contribute to raising awareness and acceptance of LGBT young people’.

    This inclusion can only be a good thing. We need to let pupils know that the world is diverse, with space for everyone, regardless of who they are, or who they love.

    Children and young people today already accept and embrace diversity.

    Society has moved so far since the dark days of Section 28, when children were given a clear message that difference was wrong. That being LGBT was taboo and shameful.

    But we could do more, and embracing difference enriches our lives, and builds a better world for all of our children.

    For more information on supporting transgender children see mermaids.co.uk.

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    MORE: 5 of the best children’s books for an LGBT family


    School kids in classroomSchool kids in classroomqinxieSchool kids in classroomchildren playingSchool kids in classroomSchool kids in classroomqinxieSchool kids in classroomchildren playing

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    colorful lake in Java,Indonesia
    (Picture: Getty Images)

    Fancy taking a trip a little further out than your standard visit to Paris?

    If you’re considering an island holiday, you might as well make sure it happens at one of the best islands in the world. Go big or go home, right?

    Thankfully Travel + Leisure has just released their annual ranking of the best islands to visit in 2018, so you don’t have to do too much of your own research to find a dreamy vacation location.

    Topping the list this year is Java, an Indonesia island filled with waterfalls, volcanoes, protected parks, and stunning white sand beaches.

    It’s the first time Java has even appeared in the top 10, and the first island in three years to knock Palawan Island off the top spot.

    If you’re pondering a visit, we’d recommend planning to spend at least a week on the island – there’s so much to do.

    Head to the Borobudur Temple, climb Mount Ijen, and visit every dreamy beach you can fit in. It’s worth visiting the Rainbow Village while you’re there – a village made up of buildings painted in rainbow brights – if only for an excellent pic for the ‘Gram.

    If Java doesn’t sound like your thing (we question why not, but hey), don’t worry, as we’ve rounded up Travel + Leisure’s top ten ranking of the best islands in the world below.

    1. Java, Indonesia

    BuddhaJavaIndonesiaJogjakartaBorobudur
    (Picture: Moment RF/Getty)

     

    2. Bali, Indonesia

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    3. Lombok, Indonesia

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    4. Maldives

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    5. Waiheke, New Zealand

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    6. Palawan, Philippines

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    7. Mauritius

    (Picture: Getty)

    8. Cebu, Philippines

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    9. Paros, Greece

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    10. Tasmania, Australia

    (Picture: Getty)

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    Beautiful mountain and forest landscape with a colorful lakeBeautiful mountain and forest landscape with a colorful lakeellencscottcolorful lake in Java,IndonesiaBuddhaJavaIndonesiaJogjakartaBorobudurBeautiful mountain and forest landscape with a colorful lakeBeautiful mountain and forest landscape with a colorful lakeellencscottcolorful lake in Java,IndonesiaBuddhaJavaIndonesiaJogjakartaBorobudur

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    Seafood Brassiere are popular in Paris.
    (Picture: John Harper)

    If you’ve ever eaten raw oysters lying open on a bed of ice with a fresh wedge of lemon, or Tabasco or vinegar to drizzle over them, those oysters will have been alive.

    Those salty little (supposed) aphrodisiacs were living and breathing organisms when you snapped them for Instagram and tipped their shells towards your lips… and that’s a good thing.

    Dead oysters cannot be eaten raw, because they contain bacteria that can be very dangerous for humans. If you eat a dead oyster raw, you’re probably going to get poorly (fever/chills, vomiting, diarrhoea – among other symptoms).

    But if you want to enjoy your oysters raw (and alive), are you causing them pain?

    Seafish, a non-departmental public body set up to improve efficiency and raise standards across the seafood industry, say that whether or not oysters feel pain is still up for debate.

    ‘Unfortunately there’s no definitive proof either way. There are groups that argue oysters might feel pain, and others who say because they don’t have a central nervous system then they don’t feel pain in the way other seafood species might. We currently don’t have research in this area.

    ‘As for when they actually die, this is likely to happen when they are shucked, rather than when they are chewed or swallowed.’

    Shucking is when the two shells of an oyster are levered apart and fully opened.

    So oysters probably aren’t alive when you bite into them or when they hit your stomach if you choose to swallow them whole.

    Fresh raw oysters
    Yep, these guys are probably still alive. (Picture: nmaxfield)

    If you’ve bought oysters to open and eat raw at home, you can tell whether an oyster is safe to eat raw quite easily.

    Is the shell completely closed? If so, the oyster inside should be alive.

    If the shell is slightly open, flick it with your finger. The shell should close.

    If it doesn’t, that means the oyster inside is dead and should only be eaten cooked.

    Bruce Rennie of chef and owner of The Shore, Penzance told Metro.co.uk: ‘You really want to eat the oysters when the lid is tightly closed and shuck them yourself to guarantee freshness.

    ‘Also it’s best to store them in the fridge with the deep part of the shell downwards to retain the moisture before preparing them, they should easily live 5-7 days in a properly chilled fridge like this.

    ‘The reason for eating them alive is simply for freshness and flavour as they still have most of their iron/sea flavoured juices within the meat.

    ‘Personally, I love the iron flavour. They are far more versatile than most people give credit for. Currently I have Porthilly oysters on poached with mackerel, cucumber, sesame and wasabi…but they are also great breaded and fried or tempura as an easy introduction to them.

    ‘They were classically paired with meat dishes due to the strong iron flavour and used to be cheaper than most meat.’

    Remember that if you buy shell-less oysters in a bag or jar, they’re absolutely not intended to be eaten raw. You must cook them.

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    Seafood Brassiere, Oysters, ParisSeafood Brassiere, Oysters, ParishpwilliamsonSeafood Brassiere are popular in Paris.Fresh raw oystersSeafood Brassiere, Oysters, ParisSeafood Brassiere, Oysters, ParishpwilliamsonSeafood Brassiere are popular in Paris.Fresh raw oysters

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    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)

    Santiago Borja has been working as a pilot for years.

    That means he’s seen some pretty incredible sights.

    Lucky for us, he’s blessed us all with a glimpse from inside the cockpit by sharing breathtaking photos of the sky as he flies.

    The pilot has captured photos of the centre of storms, lightning bolts, and flickering lights of cities below the clouds.

    Now, he’s released the stunning images in a book called ‘The Storm Pilot’.

    #THESTORMPILOT - Santiago Borja, published by teNeues, ?25, www.teneues.com
    #THESTORMPILOT – Santiago Borja, published by teNeues. (Picture: Santiago Borja)

    You can buy it online now, if you fancy, or take a look at some of the images from the book below to marvel at all the hidden wonders you can only see when you’re up in the sky.

    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)
    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)
    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)
    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)
    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)
    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)
    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)
    (Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.
    (Picture: 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. http://www.santiagoborja.com)

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    #THE STORMPILOT#THE STORMPILOTellencscott(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.#THESTORMPILOT - Santiago Borja, published by teNeues, ?25, www.teneues.com(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.#THE STORMPILOT#THE STORMPILOTellencscott(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.#THESTORMPILOT - Santiago Borja, published by teNeues, ?25, www.teneues.com(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.(Picture: ? 2018 Santiago Borja. All rights reserved. www.santiagoborja.com) As a pilot, Santiago Borja flies around the globe every day, often coming up against wild storms and various types of turbulence. In case of such encounters, Borja the ?Stormpilot? always keeps his camera in the cockpit, capturing breathtaking images of the very center of the storm?swirling clouds, up-close lightning bolts, a surreal ghostly glow, and somewhere thousands of miles below, the flickering of civilization in the rain. Santiago?s captivating aerial storm photographs, featured in a number of prestigious galleries, are brought together for the first time in this book, accompanied by lively and informative texts about the dramatic weather phenomena his photos reveal. For anyone captivated by life above the clouds and the violent beauty of nature, Borja?s images offer awesome insights into a tempestuous world.

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    (Picture: metro.co.uk)

    We know that we should all be wearing sunscreen – and not just relying on moisturisers with an SPF rating.

    But it’s not enough to just slather on the stuff willy-nilly.

    New research shows just how important it is to apply your sun cream properly, finding that spreading it thinly on the skin may provide less than half the expected degree of protection.

    Scientists from King’s College London analysed DNA damage from ultraviolet rays in the skin of volunteers wearing various levels of sunscreen thickness, ranging from 0.75 milligrams per square centimetre to the recommended two milligrams per square centimetre.

    They found that sunscreen lost much of its effectiveness if applied below the recommended thickness of two milligrams per square centimetre of skin, which is the thickness level on which manufacturers’ SPF ratings are based.

    That’s concerning, considering that previous studies have found that some people apply their sun cream as thinly spread as 0.8mg/cm2.

    Biopsy tissue samples showed that repeated UV exposure caused ‘considerable’ DNA damage to unprotected skin areas, even when the radiation dose was very low, but that damage reduced as the thickness of applied sunscreen increased.

    Five days of high dose UV with 2mg/cm2 of sunscreen produced significantly less damage than just one day of low-dose exposure when skin was unprotected.

    (Picture: Ella Byworth/ Shutterstock)

    Lead researcher Professor Antony Young said: ‘There is no dispute that sunscreen provides important protection against the cancer-causing impact of the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

    ‘However, what this research shows is that the way sunscreen is applied plays an important role in determining how effective it is.

    ‘Given that most people don’t use sunscreens as tested by manufacturers, it’s better for people to use a much higher SPF than they think is necessary.’

    Researchers recommend making sure to apply the recommended amount of sun cream, but also to choose a higher SPF than you may think you need.

    How much sun cream do I need to apply?

    NHS guidelines recommend using two teaspoons worth of sunscreen for your head, shoulders, and neck, and two tablespoons worth for the rest of your body.

    Make sure every bit of skin on show is covered and reapply regularly throughout the day, especially after swimming or showering.

    Nina Goad, from the British Association of Dermatologists, said: ‘This research demonstrates why it’s so important to choose an SPF of 30 or more.

    ‘In theory an SPF of 15 should be sufficient, but we know that in real-world situations we need the additional protection offered by a higher SPF.

    ‘It also shows why we shouldn’t rely on sunscreen alone for sun protection, but we should also use clothing and shade.

    ‘An extra consideration is that when we apply sunscreen, we are prone to missing patches of skin, as well as applying it too thinly.’

    MORE: The vegan, cruelty-free guide to skincare: Eye creams

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    How to remove suncream stainsHow to remove suncream stainsellencscottHow to remove suncream stainsHow to remove suncream stainsellencscott

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    ‘I went home with a Tinder date and lost my erection in the middle of sex. I asked her for a blowjob to get it back up, but she was so offended that she locked herself in the bathroom, and I lay on her bed feeling awkward, wondering what to do.’

    Peter,* a professional magician, is not the only millennial to have trouble with his magic wand. While erectile dysfunction is usually associated with men in their 70s, it can also be a sticky wicket for the generation better known for spunking their money on avocado toast.

    Peter, 39, put his Tinder flop down to, ‘tiredness, alcohol, using a condom, and general apathy. I’d reached the point where I wasn’t that bothered about sleeping with her, but I was there and she wanted to, so I did.’

    It wasn’t the first time Peter had experienced difficulties. Four years earlier, he’d been at Torture Garden, a fetish night where latex is the favoured fabric. Having met a woman there, the two of them adjourned to the ‘couple’s room’ aka The Shag Pad.

    Peter says: ‘She went down on me, then started going down on another girl, wanting me to take her from behind while she did it. So I was about to have a threesome with two girls, in a room full of people having sex, and my penis just said “no”!’

    Peter put it down to the pressure to perform. He explains: ‘I’d had threesomes before, but not so publicly and not with people I didn’t know. We tried to make it work, but alcohol and the condom, combined with the pressure to perform meant it was just impossible.’

    ‘I felt embarrassed and frustrated, and I never went to another sex party without taking Cialis,’ which he explains is like Viagra.

    Ian was 21 when he first experienced an inability to get an erection. In bed with his girlfriend of one month, they fumbled about for 45 minutes without any sign of a stiffy.

    people tell us the things people said during sex that instantly killed the mood
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    He tells us: ‘We were touching each other, talking dirty, I was sucking her nipples and toes, kissing and licking her bum, massaging each other. She sucked my cock, then she tried straddling me and rubbing her vagina over it. We even got the blindfolds out – but the hardest I got was a sort of semi, then it disappeared again to Flaccid Frank.’

    Looking back, Ian says, ‘I wanted sex, and in a normal situation it would have been erect so I’m not sure why it happened. And when you start thinking about it, the panic sets in – then you can never get it up.

    ‘My girlfriend kept saying, “why aren’t you hard yet?”

    ‘I don’t think she meant to humiliate me – she was just disappointed because she was horny and frustrated – but I felt very embarrassed, and a little less of a man.’

    Unfortunately, Ian’s experience wasn’t a one-off, and his girlfriend’s reaction was worse the second time round. He says: ‘When it happened again, she was asking why couldn’t I get it up, wasn’t she sexy, was I cheating, was there an issue?

    ‘I wasn’t sure why it was happening. The only thing I could think of was that I was stressed at work.’

    Ian’s girlfriend did some research and came back with a ‘stroking challenge’ that involved him stroking his penis a set number of times during the day. He explains: ‘I’d have to stroke it ten times by 12pm, then a further ten by 5pm, and the number of strokes would increase each day. The aim wasn’t to cum, but to make me more horny, so I’d maintain an erection.’

    The scheme had its pitfalls but it may not have been total nonsense. ‘When I was at work, I’d have to nip to the toilet for a secret stroke – but it did help while we were together,’ says Ian.

    Mark, who’s 36, was on holiday in Spain when he stopped by a bar for a beer. He says: ‘There were two very attractive girls – all blonde and tanned. It turned out they were from Estonia and on their annual windsurfing pilgrimage to Tarifa – along with 100 other Estonians.’

    Mark was invited to join them for dinner at their campsite near the beach, and jumped at the prospect of meeting more women who looked like them. He says: ‘They introduced me to their friends, among whom there were more hot girls, and I sat down to spag bol next to a very attractive blonde who was also an aerobics instructor!’

    (Picture: Ella BYworth for Metro.co.uk)

    After dinner they made a camp fire. ‘We were sitting under the stars with the lights of Gibraltar twinkling in the distance,’ he tells us. ‘It was a heady scene and the next thing I knew, the aerobics instructor was dragging me back to her tent. She was sharing it with another girl who’d been asleep and I hovered outside while they were whispering – then the tent-mate was ejected.’

    Inside the tent together, Mark says that sex would have been ‘the perfect ending to the perfect day.’

    ‘She was gorgeous and I was raring to go, but I’d got carried away on the beer and the wine, and Mr. Happy wasn’t playing ball,’ he explains. ‘I thought, “come on Mark, you’re representing England, you’ve got to put on a good show – you’ve got to keep your end up.” NOTHING.’

    Fortunately for Mark, there was a happy ending: ‘In the morning, the sun rose – and so did I! So I did my bit for Blighty, and made up for the previous night’s embarrassment – I even ended up staying another night.’

    While stress, alcohol, and pressure to perform are the reasons most often cited for erectile troubles, Jack suffered his own unique obstacle when he had a one-night stand with an acquaintance who had smelly feet.

    Setting the scene, 22 year-old Jack says ‘we were all round a mutual friend’s and the conversation got a bit sexual. Being a joker, I put my appendage in a hot dog bun and offered her a bite. She screamed with laughter, and at the end of the night she collared me on the stairs and said, “I’d love a bite – do you want a lift?”‘

    Back at The Biter’s house, Jack says, ‘everything was going swimmingly, then half way through, I went amazingly limp. I just couldn’t ignore the smell of her feet – I should have left her shoes on.’

    While Jack’s trigger was niche, the ensuing awkwardness was textbook. ‘I kept apologising,’ he explains. ‘She’s sat naked on the bed, unsure where to put herself, I’ve made up some sh*t about being stressed recently and inside I’m looking at my dick, thinking, “wake the f*** up! Don’t do this now!”‘

    They tried everything to resurrect his erection. ‘She even offered anal, but sex is very much a mental thing for me – if it’s gone upstairs, there’s no chance,’ says Jack.

    Unaware of the reason for Jack’s stiffy going south, The Biter text him several times to say he ‘owed her one.’ Wanting to redeem himself, and because he’d, ‘thoroughly enjoyed it until that moment,’ Jack decided to set up a second round – but he had to ensure he wouldn’t encounter the same issue.

    ‘I was very cute in my approach,’ he says, explaining that he sent her a message saying: ‘“Laura, I owe you one – I can’t leave it there. Be showered and dressed in very little…”‘

    Luckily for Jack, his carefully worded washing hint worked, ‘and we liaised a few times after that.’

    Relationship and dating coach James Preece tells Metro.co.uk: “Erectile dysfunction is incredibly common and something that happens to most guys at some point. It can be down to any number of reasons, but it’s mainly psychological.

    ‘This isn’t a big problem, but the more you worry about it, the more chance it will become a much bigger one.

    Preece advises against taking drugs like Cialis and Viagra, explaining: ‘That’s not a long term solution. You’ll get into the habit of having to take them every time, and it will become even harder to stop.’

    Partners can help by ‘being as reassuring as you can. Go back a step and continue foreplay to help relax them. It’s useful to take their mind off what’s happened and things may occur naturally later on. A change of scenery – going from the bedroom to another room – can make all the difference.’

    In a final word of wisdom, Preece says: ‘If this happens to you just remember it’s completely normal and the chances are that things will be fine next time.’

    But of course, if troubles with getting it up are happening all the time, it’s worth chatting to your GP. They won’t judge and it’s worth going through the awkwardness of bringing it up to get things sorted.

    *Names have been changed.

    MORE: How can you tell if a condom is too big for you?

    MORE: Let’s talk about being the one before the one

    MORE: Meet the people getting off on breastfeeding their partners


    Picture: Metro.co.uk, GettyMillennial erectile dysfunctionPicture: Metro.co.uk, GettyMillennial erectile dysfunctionellencscottpeople tell us the things people said during sex that instantly killed the moodPicture: Metro.co.uk, GettyMillennial erectile dysfunctionPicture: Metro.co.uk, GettyMillennial erectile dysfunctionellencscottpeople tell us the things people said during sex that instantly killed the mood

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    Getting better series: A year of antidepressants
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    The first time I heard my depression described as ‘medication-resistant,’ I was in hospital following a mental health crisis.

    Those two little words overwhelmed me with a sense of hopelessness. I’d thought that being admitted to hospital would mean I’d finally get my meds sorted and find relief from the darkness that had been plaguing me for years.

    Instead it felt like the doctors were giving up on me.

    I’m not alone in feeling like this. Up to two-thirds of people with depression don’t respond to the first antidepressant they try, and as many as a third try two or more different medications with little success.

    Those of us who fall into this latter category are considered to have treatment-resistant depression.

    Carrie*, a full-time mum of two with recurrent depressive disorder, knows just how discouraging it can feel when conventional treatments fail.

    ‘I’m on maximum doses of two different antidepressants, but life is still a struggle,’ she explains. ‘It really shouldn’t be this difficult to function.’

    Experts disagree on exactly what treatment-resistant depression means.

    Some say it’s when a person has failed to respond to two or more antidepressants, while others say patients should try four different treatments before their illness can be considered treatment-resistant.

    Either way, it can be a pretty bleak picture.

    I’ve tried more medications that I can remember in my quest for wellness. I’m currently taking a cocktail of antidepressants, antipsychotics and tranquilisers, with the occasional sleeping tablet thrown in for good measure.

    I’ve had a year of weekly psychology sessions, and three inpatient admissions. But yet again, after a brighter period that lasted several months, I find myself right back in the pit of depression.

    The problem stems partly from the fact that mental illness is such a complex thing to treat.

    ‘Mental health problems can be caused by all sorts of things, often a combination of different factors, and in some cases we never know why someone struggles with their mental health,’ explains Rachel Boyd, information manager at the mental health charity Mind.

    This means treating depression – particularly in people who’ve been suffering for a long time, or have had multiple episodes – can be a matter of trial and error.

    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    It’s rarely as simple as ‘just’ treating a chemical imbalance with the right medication, or ‘just’ having counselling to address a past trauma.

    Some us require a specific combination of meds, while others respond best when talking therapy is offered alongside tablets.

    Others need a more intensive treatment programme: electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been suggested to me on more than one occasion, but I’m too scared to try it.

    Another complication is that mental illnesses tend to have overlapping symptoms, which can make it difficult to reach the right diagnosis, and thus prescribe the right treatment.

    But does having treatment-resistant depression mean we’re never going to get better?

    Rachel Boyd thinks not.

    ‘What people find helpful in managing their mental health will vary, and what works for one individual may not work for another,’ she explains.

    ‘It’s key that mental health services don’t take a one-size-fits-all approach, and, rather than seeing people as treatment-resistant, ensure they are offered a choice of treatment options, whether that’s drugs, talking therapies, alternatives such as art therapy or exercise, or a combination of some or all of these.’

    Despite still suffering with depression, Carrie has found that adding counselling to her treatment regime has helped the clouds lift a little.

    ‘I know I have issues relating to my marriage breakdown, and being able to work through those in a safe space is definitely therapeutic,’ she says.

    The gold standard in helping people with treatment-resistant depression is a three-step approach, according to research published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

    This involves first optimising the dose of an antidepressant, then augmenting it using an additional medication, and, if the person still doesn’t respond, trying a different medication or therapy.

    ‘Being told your depression is treatment-resistant can be upsetting, as it implies that you are unable to recover, but too often, people aren’t offered the right level of support, or may be given a treatment that doesn’t work for them,’ says Rachel.

    For some overcoming treatment-resistant depression is as simple as switching to a different antidepressant. Most of us are offered an SSRI like fluoxetine (Prozac) or citalopram as a first-line treatment, but there are over 30 different antidepressants in use, and if one or more have failed, there are plenty of other options available.

    This can take time, as each antidepressant needs to be trialled for six to eight weeks before it can be ruled in or out, but many people will eventually hit on the right medication for them.

    ‘Everyone should have their treatment reviewed regularly to check whether it’s working,’ Rachel advises. ‘If this isn’t happening, or if you’ve discussed your wishes with your doctor and you’re not happy with their advice, it’s your right to ask for a second opinion.’

    Some people find a more holistic approach is needed to treat their depression, which includes therapy or self-help methods.

    ‘Online counselling services are becoming more and more popular, although it’s important to make sure the service you are accessing is safe and professional, so it’s advisable to ask your GP for a recommendation,’ says Rachel.

    ‘Peer-to-peer support through online forums can also be helpful, especially if you feel unable to confide in friends or find it difficult to speak to people face-to-face.’

    There’s also solid evidence that exercise and mindfulness can improve our mental health, and increasingly, GPs are thinking outside the box and referring people for alternative therapies like art therapy.

    ‘As well as potentially benefitting people with issues like depression and anxiety, arts therapies are recommended for more severe mental health problems including schizophrenia and psychosis,’ Rachel explains.

    The fact remains, though, that treating depression has been described as ‘more of an art than a science.’

    It can be hard to keep the faith when you’re ploughing through this process – but it’s important to persevere.

    ‘We know that many people can and do recover, and are able to manage their mental health for years to come, when the right support is in place,’ says Rachel.

    As for me, I’m off to see my psychiatrist in a few days’ time, and will yet again be asking him to review my treatment plan.

    And although I feel like I’m running out of options, I’m still holding onto the hope that this time, we’ll finally find the Holy Grail: the treatment that works for me.

    *Name has been changed.

    To talk about mental health in a private, judgement-free zone, join our Mentally Yours Facebook group.

    Need support? Contact the Samaritans

    For emotional support you can call the Samaritans 24-hour helpline on 116 123, email jo@samaritans.org, visit a Samaritans branch in person or go to the Samaritans website.

    MORE: Do we have to accept the side effects of mental health meds?

    MORE: I’m an older man with an eating disorder but to medical professionals, I’m totally invisible

    MORE: ‘It crushes your hopes’: People share bad experiences of sharing mental health issues in the workplace


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    What could possibly make the happiest place on earth even happier?

    Well, some booze of course.

    While the actual Disneyland park itself is still not permitted to sell alcohol (probably because of all those pesky kids) Disney’s California Adventure just over the road in Anaheim is, and they’re making the most of it.

    But they aren’t just selling tins of beer – Clarabelle’s Hand Scooped Ice Cream at California Adventure is now selling hard ice cream floats, so you can cool down, have a sweet treat, and get a little bit tipsy all at once.

    Instagram Photo

    The floats are just $10.49 (£7.97) each and you can buy any ice cream flavour you want submerged in any alcoholic drink of your choice – including hard root beer, Guinness, and hard orange soda.

    It’s the perfect adult reimagining of your childhood faves – and will put to rest once and for all any rumours that Disneyland is just for kids.

    If you want to make your mouth water while planning that trip to California ASAP, check out the photos of the treats on offer at Clarabelle’s on Instagram. 

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    Drool.

    MORE: Tokyo Disneyland is expanding and it’s getting Frozen and Tangled villages

    MORE: An ice cream sandwich pop-up is now open in London

    MORE: How to save cash while you’re on holiday this summer


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    It has been sunscreen weather for weeks (Picture: Getty Images)

    With the news that many people have not been applying their sunscreen properly, people are wondering how they can change their ways for the better.

    Scientists have stated that many people are applying the sun tan lotion much too thinly, which drastically reduces how effective it is.

    With the lengthy spell of hot weather we are experiencing it is very important to know how much sunscreen you should be putting on.

    Here is how much to apply and how sunscreen actually works…

    Make sure you keep creamed up (Picture: Getty)

    As reported by Live Science, sunscreen works by using organic and inorganic chemicals.

    The organic chemicals, such as avobenzone or oxybenzone, absorb UV radiation, which slowly breaks down their chemical bonds and releases heat.

    The inorganic chemicals in suncreen, such as zinc oxide, reflect the UV rays physically, using the same principal of white paint reflecting light.

    The two methods work together to avoid the harmful effects of the UV rays.

    Have a teaspoon to hand if you can (Picture: Getty)

    The recommended thickness of sunscreen is two milligrams per square centimetre of skin.

    That can be quite hard to visualise, so the teaspoon rule might come in handy.

    The sunscreen teaspoon rule

    NHS guidelines recommend using two teaspoons worth of sunscreen for your head, shoulders, and neck, and two tablespoons worth for the rest of your body.

    According to SunSense, the following amount of SPF 50/50+ sunscreen should be applied…

    • One teaspoon for each leg
    • One teaspoon for the front of the body
    • One teaspoon for the back of the boday
    • Half a teaspoon for the face
    • Half a teaspoon for the neck
    • Half a teaspoon for each arm

    You should then reapply the sunscreen every two to four hours and after swimming, exercising, sweating and towelling dry.

    MORE: Apple rumours suggest the next iPhone will come in a range of crazy colours

    MORE: Disneyland is now serving boozy ice cream floats


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    (Picture: getty/metro)

    We really do love using modern technology to be dicks to each other.

    All those new avenues of communication are the perfect way to hammer home that you’re ignoring someone, right?

    But it’s not just artfully ignoring a stream of texts or disappearing after a date wrecking our society: Now ghosting has entered the workplace.

    This isn’t the first time the concept of workplace ghosting has popped up. Last year it was used to refer to unanswered emails between freelancers and clients, and to bosses refusing to respond to employees’ requests for meetings.

    Now, however, the ghosting power imbalance has flipped.

    According to Chip Cutter, the managing editor at LinkedIn, it’s now job candidates and employees cutting off communication and doing a disappearing act.

    ‘Candidates agree to job interviews and fail to show up, never saying more,’ Chip wrote on LinkedIn. ‘Some accept jobs, only to not appear for the first day of work, no reason given, of course.

    ‘Instead of formally quitting, enduring a potentially awkward conversation with a manager, some employees leave and never return. Bosses realize they’ve quit only after a series of unsuccessful attempts to reach them. The hiring process begins anew.’

    This type of workplace ghosting is a nightmare for managers and recruiters, who have to struggle to fill roles and deal with the fallout with rapid speed; suddenly confronted with work that needs doing and no way to get in contact with the person they thought would be doing it.

    (Picture: Ella Byworth/mylo)

    A workplace ghoster isn’t usually pulling a disappearing act for the lols, but so they can avoid the awkwardness of turning down a job offer or formally quitting.

    Disillusionment in the world of working likely has an impact. Repeated rejection from dream jobs makes workers apply for all the roles they can get their hands on, which then results in having multiple offers that they have to turn down, while experience with poor management can make them feel unable to bring up issues with the workplace, instead choosing to just stop showing up.

    You could also see it as karmic retribution for the years of ghosting on employers parts – the emails answered, the interview follow-ups ignored, the slow fade of freelance work without any explanation.

    If employers can’t take the time to tell someone they haven’t landed a job, why should candidates have to make the effort of formally turning an offer down?

    Add in the ease of ghosting and it feels like a tempting option compared to the horror of having an IRL chat or an uncomfortable phone call. No one likes letting people down – disappearing so you don’t have to deal with the discomfort is a method we’re using in our dating lives, so it’s natural it’d feed into our work, too.

    But at a time when jobs feel unstable, throwing ghosting into the mix can only make things worse. So what can we do?

    On employers’ ends, it’s tempting to start overbooking interviews or treating every candidate with suspicion, but longterm that could bring up more problems.

    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    A better approach is to maintain open communication with candidates for jobs and freelancers, leading by example by declining pitches, having uncomfortable chats, and letting people know they haven’t landed the gig.

    Creating a culture of honesty without judgement is key. Workers need to feel comfortable bringing up problems or explaining that a job isn’t right for them without fearing they’ll be ostracised.

    Yes, booking in more people for interview is probably wise, but it’s still going to be frustrating when the person you want for a role bails while seeming entirely enthusiastic. We need to create a culture where it’s okay to be open about other offers and our decision making.

    And workers: We know it’s maddening when you don’t get a single response to all fifteen of your job applications.

    We know all the interviews with no follow-up are slowly chipping away at your soul.

    But if you are blessed enough to get a job offer that you don’t want to take, or you have a job that isn’t working out for you, try to avoid ghosting. It’s the easier option, sure, but your disappearing act won’t go unnoticed. People will talk, word will spread, and your reputation of ditching may harm your chances at getting another job in the future.

    Bosses will understand turning down a job or quitting. If they don’t, it’s time to take things to HR.

    Cutting off all communication and hoping that’ll be okay isn’t a great idea, if only because everyone in the workplace will worry that you’ve been eaten by lions or you’ve got trapped in the lift.

    Take a breath, plan out what you need to say, and remember that letting down an employer gently is going to disappoint them much less than vanishing into thin air.

    MORE: People with depression are more productive at work if they can talk to their bosses

    MORE: How to talk to your boss about stress

    MORE: Anxious to ultramarathon: How one runner went from anxiety-induced paralysis to 100k


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    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

    Most of us have received a scam email from someone telling us we’ve won £1 million or a very wealthy prince is in love with us.

    Tom Sheerin received a message from a man named Michael on Facebook – telling him that he had been authorised to contact him ‘by the CEO of Facebook’ and that he’d won some money due to a ‘random selection’ held a few days ago.

    Apparently, Tom was the lucky winner of $1 million and also a jeep. All he had to do to get the winnings was pay $500 in delivery fees. Seems legit.

    Instead of just telling Michael to go away, Tom decided to have some fun with him.

    He ended up having an entire conversation with him and – lucky for us – uploaded the full exchange on Facebook.

    It all started with a simple hello

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    And then Michael announced Tom’s winnings

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Of course, Tom needed proof that the winnings were real…

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    And so Michael sent a photo

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    That’s when Tom’s trolling started

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    And some extras were added into the mix

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Tom went on to give Michael a fake address

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    For some reason, Michael actually thought Tom believed him

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Apparently, Tom was delaying his winnings by not paying ASAP

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Still not happy with how far he’d gone with the trolling, Tom went on to ask Michael whether he would accept Tesco Clubcard

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    To which he received a firm ‘No’

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Tom explained that he had the money, but it was all in fivers

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    And Michael tried to sort out the delivery of the ‘money’

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Suddenly Tom decided he wanted to bring his friend Biff along to the payment

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    But Michael sent out a privacy warning

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    There was just no giving up with Tom

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Michael finally sent over his payment details, but Tom decided to nip to the ‘pub’

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    And suddenly, the news knew about the winnings

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook) Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    To which Michael wasn’t happy about…

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    And apparently, the winnings were to be ‘terminated’

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    He was very serious…

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    But as soon as the money was mentioned again, the deal was back on

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    As it turns out, Tom didn’t have the money – and Michael said he should get a loan

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

     

    Instead, Tom showed Michael his ’17-year-old son’s’ drawing – which he loved

    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)Decided to have a little fun with someone trying to scam me on facebook, kept him busy for about 2 hours, feel free to share
    (Picture: Tom Sheerin/Facebook)

    According to Tom, he kept Michael busy for at least two hours before he finally realised he was being trolled.

    To be fair, two hours of trolling for trying to take money off a random guy on Facebook is a pretty good punishment.

    Since sharing the images to his Facebook page, Tom’s post has received has received more than 8,000 likes and 21,000 shares from amused Facebook users.

    But of course, there was one person who wasn’t amused – and that was Michael, who’s left the situation empty handed.

    MORE: Not content with ruining dating, ghosting has now entered the workplace

    MORE: You can now spread pornstar martini all over your toast


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    metro illustrations
    Body confidence issues don’t undo the privilege (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    I am naturally thin, and because of that lucky quirk of genetics, I am able to walk through life with a privilege that I rarely, if ever, acknowledge.

    I haven’t earned that privilege. I don’t work hard at being thin, it’s neither something that I’m proud of nor ashamed of, it’s just a fact of my life that I never even think about, but which I benefit from all the time. That’s privilege, in a nutshell.

    When Cora Harrington pointed this out on Twitter recently, some people argued that, despite being ‘thin’, they still have body issues, and therefore aren’t privileged. But body confidence issues don’t undo the privilege.

    We can spot an outfit that we like on a mannequin in a shop window, go into the shop, find the outfit in our size, and buy it. We don’t have to order it online because the brand doesn’t carry ‘plus sizes’ in store, or worry that the brand doesn’t even go up to our size.

    And, frankly, shopping is the least of it.

    If I were to go on a date with a guy, order an entire pizza to myself and wolf the whole thing down, I would be a ‘cool girl’ – the sort of girl that doesn’t worry too much about her appearance, who wants to have fun and enjoy the good things in life without counting calories.

    ‘I love a girl who can eat a whole pizza,’ the man would say, admiringly.

    But if a larger woman were to go on that same date and eat that same pizza, she wouldn’t be seen as a ‘cool girl’, she’d be scorned for being unhealthy. She would get raised eyebrows and sly comments.

    Being able to eat an entire pizza when the mood takes you without feeling judgmental eyes boring into you is thin privilege.

    ILLO REQUEST: Shout out to the man who called me fat as I finally know I like myself
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    Taking a seat on public transport without hearing a sigh from your neighbour is thin privilege.

    Being able to walk down the street in shorts and a vest in hot weather without worrying about someone making a cruel comment is thin privilege.

    To me, it’s just walking down the street. I am not consciously aware, at every moment of my life, that I am benefiting from thin privilege, that’s not how it works.

    I’m probably too busy worrying about my acne or my arthritis to think about the enormous advantage that my body shape gives me.

    And before you say that ‘healthier’ people deserve to have an advantage, it’s worth pointing out that it’s often got very little to do with being a ‘healthy’ body shape. My BMI generally hovers around the ‘underweight’ mark, I’m cold all the time, and I have shockingly low upper body strength – I’m pretty damn unhealthy, actually.

    But no-one ever comes up to me in the street to give me their unsolicited opinion that I’m underweight and should eat more doughnuts, because my skinny frame is what is considered ‘normal’ in the media.

    There are other aspects of my life where I’m not on the privileged end of the scale – I’m a woman, for one – and so I can recognise privilege when I see it, even if I’m the one benefitting from it.

    I experience white privilege every day, able-bodied privilege, as well as class and financial privilege.

    They’re not always easy to acknowledge, and in the past I’ve complained at length about being skint and not having an upper class advantage. But I have a university education and I’ve always earned enough to never have to worry about not being able to pay my rent, so I am undeniably privileged in those areas, even when I feel like I’m not.

    So before you scoff at the mere idea of thin privilege, try putting yourself in someone else’s shoes and comparing your life experiences – you’ll find all kinds of little and big ways in which your life has been easier.

    MORE: What is thin privilege?

    MORE: Do men like fat women? I created two identical online dating profiles of me size 18 and size 10 to find out

    MORE: Free bleeding is a privilege many women don’t have


    sexual assaults at festivalssexual assaults at festivalsabbychandlermetro illustrationsILLO REQUEST: Shout out to the man who called me fat as I finally know I like myselfsexual assaults at festivalssexual assaults at festivalsabbychandlermetro illustrationsILLO REQUEST: Shout out to the man who called me fat as I finally know I like myself

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    Dated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: Eddie and wife Jean together. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWS NORTHERN ECHO COPYRIGHT - ONLY TO BE USED IN PRINTED EDITIONS - NOT TO BE USED ON-LINE WITHOUT FURTHER SPECIFIC PERMISSION AND LICENSE - IF USED WITHOUT PERMISSION THE NORTHERN ECHO RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION FOR BREACH OF COPYRIGHT AND DAMAGE TO BUSINESS *** Local Caption *** ** MORE IMAGES TO FOLLOW - NNP SHOOT IN PROGRESS **
    (Picture: North News / NNP)

    A man who lost his wedding ring just six months after marrying his wife has finally found it.

    Eddie Stokoe, who lives in Durham, says that the ring ‘disappeared’ when he was playing cricket in 1966. He thought he would never see it again.

    He says: ‘We had to take our jewellery off before going out in the field, and when we finished I realised that it had completely vanished. I searched everywhere for it but could not find it, and spent the next few weeks quartering the field like a barn owl, desperately looking for that ring, but with no luck.’

    Both Eddie’s and his wife’s rings had their names engraved in them and had massive sentimental value – he even refused her offer of a new ring as the original was ‘absolutely irreplaceable’.

    Discussing the moment he realised it had disappeared, Eddie said he was ‘absolutely devastated’.

    Dated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: collect of Eddie and his wife Jean on their wedding day on October 16th 1965. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWS
    (Picture: North News / NNP)

    However, after 52 long years, the 73-year-old says that he was stunned when his brother Billy, 81, called him to say that the ring was found on the same field in near-perfect condition.

    On the miraculous find,Eddie said it had been gone so long that ‘Billy couldn’t even remember that I had ever had a ring’.

    Dated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: Eddie and wife Jean together - showing their wedding rings. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWS NORTHERN ECHO COPYRIGHT - ONLY TO BE USED IN PRINTED EDITIONS - NOT TO BE USED ON-LINE WITHOUT FURTHER SPECIFIC PERMISSION AND LICENSE - IF USED WITHOUT PERMISSION THE NORTHERN ECHO RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION FOR BREACH OF COPYRIGHT AND DAMAGE TO BUSINESS *** Local Caption *** ** MORE IMAGES TO FOLLOW - NNP SHOOT IN PROGRESS **
    (Picture: North News / NNP)

    ‘I could not believe it was still there after all that time,’ said Eddie. ‘Maybe it had been picked up by a magpie and dropped off somewhere, or perhaps it had got caught up in a lawnmower.’

    But it wasn’t just Eddie that was ecstatic about the find. ‘When we got it back and I showed it to Jean, she broke down in tears of joy,’ he said.

    ‘It has been unbelievable. I wish it could talk because, having been lying there for 52 years, it must have an awful lot of stories to tell.’

    The ring no longer fits Eddie’s ring finger, but it’s been repurposed as a pinky ring – and he says he’s ‘never taking it off and risking losing it again.’

    MORE: Skydiving-loving couple tie the knot on a hot air balloon and then jump off it

    MORE: Mothers’ names to appear on marriage certificates for first time


    Husband reunited with wedding ring 52 years after losing itHusband reunited with wedding ring 52 years after losing itfebruarystationeryDated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: Eddie and wife Jean together. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWS NORTHERN ECHO COPYRIGHT - ONLY TO BE USED IN PRINTED EDITIONS - NOT TO BE USED ON-LINE WITHOUT FURTHER SPECIFIC PERMISSION AND LICENSE - IF USED WITHOUT PERMISSION THE NORTHERN ECHO RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION FOR BREACH OF COPYRIGHT AND DAMAGE TO BUSINESS *** Local Caption *** ** MORE IMAGES TO FOLLOW - NNP SHOOT IN PROGRESS **Dated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: collect of Eddie and his wife Jean on their wedding day on October 16th 1965. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWSDated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: Eddie and wife Jean together - showing their wedding rings. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWS NORTHERN ECHO COPYRIGHT - ONLY TO BE USED IN PRINTED EDITIONS - NOT TO BE USED ON-LINE WITHOUT FURTHER SPECIFIC PERMISSION AND LICENSE - IF USED WITHOUT PERMISSION THE NORTHERN ECHO RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION FOR BREACH OF COPYRIGHT AND DAMAGE TO BUSINESS *** Local Caption *** ** MORE IMAGES TO FOLLOW - NNP SHOOT IN PROGRESS **Husband reunited with wedding ring 52 years after losing itHusband reunited with wedding ring 52 years after losing itfebruarystationeryDated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: Eddie and wife Jean together. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWS NORTHERN ECHO COPYRIGHT - ONLY TO BE USED IN PRINTED EDITIONS - NOT TO BE USED ON-LINE WITHOUT FURTHER SPECIFIC PERMISSION AND LICENSE - IF USED WITHOUT PERMISSION THE NORTHERN ECHO RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION FOR BREACH OF COPYRIGHT AND DAMAGE TO BUSINESS *** Local Caption *** ** MORE IMAGES TO FOLLOW - NNP SHOOT IN PROGRESS **Dated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: collect of Eddie and his wife Jean on their wedding day on October 16th 1965. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWSDated: 25/07/2018 HOW'S THAT?! WEDDING RING LOST WHILE PLAYING CRICKET IS FOUND AFTER 52 YEARS .. Retired teacher Eddie Stokoe, 73, of Consett, County Durham, who has been reuinited with his wedding ring - 52 YEARS after losing it while playing cricket. A dog walker discovered the ring on a muddy river bank close to Shotley Bridge Cricket Club. Pictured: Eddie and wife Jean together - showing their wedding rings. SEE COPY FROM NORTH NEWS NORTHERN ECHO COPYRIGHT - ONLY TO BE USED IN PRINTED EDITIONS - NOT TO BE USED ON-LINE WITHOUT FURTHER SPECIFIC PERMISSION AND LICENSE - IF USED WITHOUT PERMISSION THE NORTHERN ECHO RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION FOR BREACH OF COPYRIGHT AND DAMAGE TO BUSINESS *** Local Caption *** ** MORE IMAGES TO FOLLOW - NNP SHOOT IN PROGRESS **

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    (Picture: Getty)

    Applying for an Australian Working Holiday visa is a choice made by thousands of Brits each year.

    And while the process is relatively easy compared to other international visas, the process can take far longer than some people might expect.

    Here are the things you need to know before you make an application:

    It might take MUCH longer than 4 weeks

    You can find the most up-to-date processing time information on the WHV website.

    While between 75% to 90% of applications used to be processed within a month, the latest statistics show that it can now take around 40 days.

    90% sounds like a lot – and it is – but when you consider just how many thousands of people are applying for a WHV every year, it becomes clear that the remaining 10% encompasses a large number of applicants as well.

    It’s safe to assume you are part of the ‘other 10%’ once you are asked to give more information like a Form 80.

    And sadly, there’s no prediction for the waiting time in the ‘other 10%’ so you could be waiting for anything between 40 days to four months.

    It’s not a good idea to book the flight before you apply

    It’s easy to assume that you’ll be one of the 90% of applicants who get their visa granted within 40 days, but that isn’t always the case.

    While it might feel safe to book flights for 3 months away, with some visas taking six months or more to be approved, you’re better off waiting.

    Yes, it’s tempting to get the cheaper flight but it’s better to buy a slightly pricier one when everything’s confirmed rather than watching your money go down the drain.

    You probably have a long wait ahead if you’ve visited certain countries in the past 4 years

    Despite the fact I had worked in Australia for six months between 2015-2016, I was made to wait because I had been on a holiday in 2014 to one of nine countries flagged for Polio.

    Naturally, a lot of care is taken to ensure diseases aren’t brought into the country and sometimes that can cause a lot of unexpected delays for anyone who is are pretty well-travelled.

    For example, if you have spent a period of 28 days or longer in Afghanistan, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Syria (or in any combination of these countries) since 5 May 2004 then you’ll need to provide a copy of your polio vaccination certificate.

    You might be able to save some time by attaching all vaccination certificates and other relevant info when applying.

    Your application has to go through a longer inspection if you have a criminal record

    It’s to be expected that those with a criminal record will have to go through a thorough check to get their visa.

    And those checks mean it will take a lot longer than the advertised time for you to get the visa approved.

    Again, just ensure to provide all the details necessary and prepare to exercise some patience.

    There IS a number to call if things are taking an exceptionally long time

    If your application is taking far longer than it should and you aren’t hearing back about it, you can reach out to offices in Europe and Australia to try to see what is going on.

    You should only do this after a good couple of months otherwise you will just get told to keep waiting and you could have wasted money and time for no reason.

    First off, you should call the Europe Service Centre who will tell you the right thing to do/add to your application.

    They can also tell you the email address you need to contact about your application.

    If emails don’t work, then you can try and call the ’13’ number (+61 131881) in Australia in order to speak to someone directly working on applications.

    However, it will cost you a pretty penny and doesn’t guarantee things will move any quicker.

    Forums are your friend

    A quick search on google will usually help you to find the right forum or thread for your particular case for delay. But the Lonely Planet threads are especially useful for getting questions answered that you can’t find answers to on the website.

    Reading other people’s stories about their recent application is also a great way to assess how long delays are taking as they often seem to be around the same length of time.

    Little things like this can help you feel like you can plan a little bit and gives a little bit more peace of mind at a very trying time.

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    MORE: Skydiving-loving couple tie the knot on a hot air balloon and then jump off it


    jumping quokkajumping quokkanolaojomujumping quokkajumping quokkanolaojomu

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    Aldi Is Launching A £9.99 Passionfruit Gin Perfect For Pornstar Martinis picture: Getty/ Mylo
    (Picture: Getty/ Mylo)

    Aldi is releasing a passionfruit gin liqueur perfect for a Pornstar martini.

    The gin, dubbed The Infusionist, comes in a 50cl bottle, has an ABV of 20 percent and costs just £9.99.

    According to Aldi, it’s filled with passionfruit flavour and has citrus notes which gives it a full flavour and a sharp acidity.

    Of course, your standard Pornstar martini isn’t made with gin – it’s made with vodka, passion fruit juice, passion fruit liqueur and vanilla and lime flavouring.

    (Picture: Getty)

    But with the gin and the flavouring covered in one cheap bottle, who cares about the original recipe?

    The gin is set to be released tomorrow, as Aldi plans to launch its Gin Festival range this month.

    If you’re a major fan of the passionfruit flavoured drink, you’ll be happy to know you can also now spread it on your toast.

    Firebox has just started selling a £9.99 passionfruit and vodka marmalade, for those who fancy an extra kick at breakfast time.

    The marmalade includes real vodka, and the product description says: ‘Pop the lid off and help yourself to a guilty fingerful of tropical decadence.

    ‘Each sinful spoonful contains real ripe passion fruit puree, balanced out with juicy oranges and tart citrus, and straddled by a vicious twist of vodka.

    ‘Spread it, drink it, bake with it, lick it, spoon it, swallow it, sensually smear it over your lover*… hey, there’s a reason it’s called passionfruit!’

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    MORE: Walt Disney World’s All Star Sports Resort is selling scoops of cookie dough


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