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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    Mid-scream school photo
    (Picture: Stronajai Miles)

    You might remember school picture day.

    Your parents make sure you’ve had a haircut and your uniform looks perfect.

    But no matter how much preparation parents put in, the picture itself is really down to the child – as this mum discovered.

    Stronajai Miles sent her five-year-old son Andrew, known as Drew, to picture day and as far as she knew, he looked perfect.

    But when the proofs for the photos came back, she had a bit of a surprise.

    Drew was caught mid-scream, with his mouth wide open, showing exactly how he felt about picture day.

    Initially, Stronajai, from Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., wasn’t very happy with the picture.

    Mid-scream school photo PROVIDED TO METRO.CO.UK Picture: provided METROGRAB via: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2660845177264573&set=a.192378427444606&type=3&theater ref: https://www.facebook.com/andrielmiles/posts/2657476957601395?__tn__=-R
    (Picture: Stronajai Miles)

    She posted it on Facebook and said: ‘I’m so mad right now! I checked my sons book bag and find these!!!!’

    She later updated the post and said: ‘I have contacted Lifetouch School Photography to figure out what happened and why! They could’ve said “you’re kid wouldn’t cooperate, anything” [sic] school was out today, so I’ll figure that part out tomorrow. I know they train their photographers better than that. They dropped the ball idc what anybody says…

    ‘P.S. My son says thanks for all the love.’

    But as the picture of Drew went viral, Stronajai softened a little. In a post two days later, she added: ‘Please allow me to explain my first reaction and how I feel now…..

    ‘Firstly, we have decided to purchase the photos.

    ‘I was initially upset because I was expecting a traditional school picture. I have spoken with representatives at Lifetouch School Photography who simply told me the issue would be escalated and someone would follow-up.

    ‘I saw an article that said free-spirited photos are their policy. If I had known, I’d have no reason to feel upset about not getting a traditional picture. Regardless, knowing that his silly picture brought joy all over the world, how can I continue to be flustered?

    Mid-scream school photo PROVIDED TO METRO.CO.UK Picture: provided METROGRAB via: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2660845177264573&set=a.192378427444606&type=3&theater ref: https://www.facebook.com/andrielmiles/posts/2657476957601395?__tn__=-R
    Drew (Picture: Stronajai Miles)

    ‘Andrew has always been a silly kid with a HUGE personality! He has taken traditional professional pictures in a school setting in the past that were wonderful. That is the reason this really threw this mom for a loop!

    ‘I love my son. All the positive comments really warmed my heart. They opened my eyes to see that everything doesn’t need to be cookie cutter. Being yourself is even more amazing! Drew sends his love and says thanks again for the love.’

    Speaking to Metro.co.uk, Stronajai added: ‘I just was really really shocked. Drew is silly and takes silly pics often I just never thought he’d do it for the school photo! He is funny. He loves trying to make people laugh. He loves making people feel good. I have never seen a kid more excited about life.

    ‘Drew has never met a stranger and truly has love for anybody he meets. And he is still trying to grasp what’s going on. But he knows something is happening and it made him really happy to know that everybody around the world is seeing this.’

    MORE: How to actually be OK with someone not liking you

    MORE: Parent bans child from Brownies sleepover because of trans policy


    Mid-scream school photo TAKEN WITHOUT PERMISSION FROM PUBLIC POST: https://www.facebook.com/andrielmiles/posts/2657476957601395 EMBEDDING ORIGINAL UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE FROM:https://www.facebook.com/pg/LifetouchSchoolPhotography/about/ Picture: Lifetouch School Photography METROGRABMid-scream school photo TAKEN WITHOUT PERMISSION FROM PUBLIC POST: https://www.facebook.com/andrielmiles/posts/2657476957601395 EMBEDDING ORIGINAL UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE FROM:https://www.facebook.com/pg/LifetouchSchoolPhotography/about/ Picture: Lifetouch School Photography METROGRAB

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    PICS BY TAYLOR GOODMAN / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Shortly after the accident, Taylor would be put in a medically induced coma) - A student burns survivor who thought she looked like Frankensteins mermaid is determined to model again to show others that life goes on. Taylor Goodman, 23, from Keota, Oklahoma, suffered 42percent burns to her body after an explosion that left her battling for her life. She believed she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile that would turn out to be gasoline, when the accident occurred. In hospital she spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts over much of her body and then three surgeries to talk again. - SEE CATERS COPY
    Shortly after an explosion at her home, Taylor was put in a medically induced coma (Picture: Taylor Goodman/Caters News Agency)

    Medical student Taylor Goodman thought she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile last year, but it was actually gasoline. This caused an explosion moments after being set alight.

    The 23-year-old from Oklahoma, U.S, suffered major burns to her body in the explosion, in which she almost died.

    After being burned on 42% of her body, Taylor spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts, and then three surgeries to be able to talk again.

    She suffered third-degree burns on her arms and legs and second-degree burns on her face and neck. Taylor was told she would lose her legs if she didn’t have skin graft surgeries.

    Warning: This article contains graphic images. 

    The former model was left with mobility restrictions caused by her scarring while relearning to walk.

    Despite the scars, which left Taylor feeling like ‘Frankenstein’s mermaid’, she says she wants to go back to the casual modelling gigs she used to do.

    She wants to show people that life goes on, no matter what adversities are thrown your way.

    PICS BY TAYLOR GOODMAN / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Taylor felt like Frankensteins mermaid from her scarring and suffered terrible burns to 42percent of her body - a mix of third and second degree) - A student burns survivor who thought she looked like Frankensteins mermaid is determined to model again to show others that life goes on. Taylor Goodman, 23, from Keota, Oklahoma, suffered 42percent burns to her body after an explosion that left her battling for her life. She believed she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile that would turn out to be gasoline, when the accident occurred. In hospital she spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts over much of her body and then three surgeries to talk again. - SEE CATERS COPY
    Taylor suffered burns to 42% of her body (Picture: Taylor Goodman/Caters News Agency)

    Taylor, who is training to become a nurse, is now learning to embrace her scarring. She hopes to pose for shoots to empower other survivors.

    She said: ‘When I woke up I was wrapped like a mummy everywhere. I was unable to talk and in so much pain.

    ‘I broke down. I couldn’t walk, talk, or use my hands. Physical therapy was so painful, as it was stretching all of my scars.

    ‘I felt like Frankenstein’s mermaid because my legs looked like fish scales to me, like snakeskin and I felt like a monster.

    PICS BY TAYLOR GOODMAN / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Shortly after the accident, Taylor would be put in a medically induced coma) - A student burns survivor who thought she looked like Frankensteins mermaid is determined to model again to show others that life goes on. Taylor Goodman, 23, from Keota, Oklahoma, suffered 42percent burns to her body after an explosion that left her battling for her life. She believed she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile that would turn out to be gasoline, when the accident occurred. In hospital she spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts over much of her body and then three surgeries to talk again. - SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Taylor Goodman/Caters News Agency)

    ‘My self-esteem was at an all-time low, not being able to do the things I used to and not looking the same.’

    ‘I still don’t see myself the same, but I know I can’t change it, so I live with it and yes I will model again to show other burn survivors that life goes on.’

    Recalling the horrifying accident, which took place in June last year, Taylor said she begged to be put to sleep at the time.

    PICS BY TAYLOR GOODMAN / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Taylors legs were the worst affected by the burns and are much better but were particularly scarred) - A student burns survivor who thought she looked like Frankensteins mermaid is determined to model again to show others that life goes on. Taylor Goodman, 23, from Keota, Oklahoma, suffered 42percent burns to her body after an explosion that left her battling for her life. She believed she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile that would turn out to be gasoline, when the accident occurred. In hospital she spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts over much of her body and then three surgeries to talk again. - SEE CATERS COPY
    Taylor’s legs were the worst affected by the burns and were particularly scarred (Picture: Taylor Goodman/Caters News Agency)

    ‘I remember being blown backward and feeling like I was on fire, so I stopped, dropped and rolled,’ she said.

    ‘Then I still felt like I was on fire, so I rolled again. When I stood up, all I saw was my skin falling off my hand and legs.

    ‘Screaming at the top of my lungs, I ran as fast as I could to the truck to go to the hospital.

    ‘I was screaming in the hospital and doctors were telling me to calm down, because I was scaring the other patients, so I begged them to put me to sleep.

    ‘I remember feeling my face blistering, my lips tightening up, and seeing my hair burnt on the pillow.’

    PICS BY TAYLOR GOODMAN / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: MANDATORY BYLINE MAX SLATER PHOTOGRAPHY - Here is Taylor before the accident when she used to model, she is hoping to return to modelling) - A student burns survivor who thought she looked like Frankensteins mermaid is determined to model again to show others that life goes on. Taylor Goodman, 23, from Keota, Oklahoma, suffered 42percent burns to her body after an explosion that left her battling for her life. She believed she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile that would turn out to be gasoline, when the accident occurred. In hospital she spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts over much of her body and then three surgeries to talk again. - SEE CATERS COPY
    Taylor before the accident, when she used to model (Picture: Taylor Goodman/Caters News Agency)
    PICS BY TAYLOR GOODMAN / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: MANDATORY BYLINE MAX SLATER PHOTOGRAPHY - Here is Taylor before the accident when she used to model, she is hoping to return to modelling) - A student burns survivor who thought she looked like Frankensteins mermaid is determined to model again to show others that life goes on. Taylor Goodman, 23, from Keota, Oklahoma, suffered 42percent burns to her body after an explosion that left her battling for her life. She believed she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile that would turn out to be gasoline, when the accident occurred. In hospital she spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts over much of her body and then three surgeries to talk again. - SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Taylor Goodman/Caters News Agency)

    During the various operations, surgeons took skin grafts from Taylor’s stomach, upper thighs and side to replace the damaged skin.

    She needed three additional surgeries to repair damage caused to her vocal cords to enable her to talk again.

    Taylor said she pushed herself every day in physical therapy.

    PICS BY TAYLOR GOODMAN / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Taylor felt like Frankensteins mermaid from her scarring and suffered terrible burns to 42percent of her body - a mix of third and second degree) - A student burns survivor who thought she looked like Frankensteins mermaid is determined to model again to show others that life goes on. Taylor Goodman, 23, from Keota, Oklahoma, suffered 42percent burns to her body after an explosion that left her battling for her life. She believed she was lighting a line of diesel to burn a rubbish pile that would turn out to be gasoline, when the accident occurred. In hospital she spent 25 days in the burns unit, requiring two blood transfusions, skin grafts over much of her body and then three surgeries to talk again. - SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Taylor Goodman/Caters News Agency)

    She went through rehabilitation to relearn how to walk and reduce her mobility issues.

    While still learning to accept her new appearance, she is positive about the future and hopes to some day inspire others by modelling once again.

    ‘At first, the scarring terrified me, knowing I would never look the same ever again,’ said Taylor.

    ‘I used to be a model, and I knew I had lost that hobby.

    ‘But day by day, I see progress slowly but surely. I’ve accepted that I can’t change what happened or speed up time.

    ‘At first I would have break downs everyday about my scars, but I’m slowly starting to accept I can’t change what happened.’

    MORE: Woman who survived 96% burns has now become an Avon model

    MORE: Swimwear campaign features women with disabilities, body hair, stretch marks and scars

    MORE: Bonfire burns survivor shunned by her own family who said she did it to herself


    Burns survivorBurns survivor

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    giving up smoking by throwing away cigarettes
    (Picture: Getty)

    Today is No Smoking Day 2019, where smokers across the UK will be urged to reconsider their habit and try to give up.

    Health bodies will be publicising the dangers of smoking, with tobacco users advised to think of the health implications on themselves and others.

    It definitely seems easier said than done if you are addicted to smoking, but there are plenty of ways to kick the habit for good.

    Remember, just because something hasn’t worked for you doesn’t mean there aren’t other options or different ways to approach the method.

    Take a look at seven of the ways you can break your addition (although you may find that a combination of these is best for you).

    Sorry, this video isn't available any more.

    Cold turkey

    This option is ideal if you have the willpower.

    You’ll likely experience an array of withdrawal symptoms, from cravings, to sleep disturbances, to a bad cough. That’s certainly not to say you won’t get through it, but it’s worth understanding that if you’re struggling, it’s not because you’re weak, but because your body will be temporarily working against you. In fact, stats by the NHS claim that only 3 in 100 smokers manage to stop permanently this way.

    If you do choose to give up smoking cold turkey, your best trick will be distraction.

    Every time you have a craving, you’re used to picking up a cigarette. Instead, having something to do with your body (and hands in particular) will help you ride through the need to smoke.

    Similarly, going for an approach where you continue to ‘delay’ your cigarette until the next craving – then the next, then the next, and so on – can help you feel that it’s less final and take each moment as it comes.

    Nicotine replacement therapy

    According to the NHS, using NRT can help double your chances of stopping smoking for good. They’ll give you a low level of the addictive nicotine found in cigarettes, but without things like tar, carbon monoxide, and other chemicals in tobacco smoke.

    There are several ways you can get NRT, and it comes in the form of patches, gum, inhalators, oral strips, lozenges, and sprays.

    You may wish to combine a slower release form like a patch with something like a gum or an inhilator to use when you’re suffering from a craving.

    stop smoking using nicotine patch
    (Picture: Getty)

    Non nicotine based medication

    There are other medicines you can use which don’t include nicotine; the most common of which are Champix and Zyban.

    These work with your brain to reduce your cravings, and are taken for up to two weeks before you give up smoking to take effect.

    You can get these from your doctor on prescription.

    Cognitive behavioural therapy

    In your quest to give up smoking, recognising the triggers that get you reaching for a packet of cigarettes is imperative.

    You may find that CBT is helpful for you in realising where your dependence comes from, and changing those patterns for good. It could also help you work through any negative emotions you may have as part of the quitting process.

    It’s worth keeping in mind, however, that it’s unlikely to work completely on its own, and should be discussed with your GP as part of your overall smoking cessation plan.

    Hypnotism

    The research around hypnosis is mixed regarding whether it works to help people stop smoking. Anecdotal evidence would have us believe, however, that it’s certainly an option worth considering.

    If you’re looking for a solution and have tried everything it may be a route to take, and you can do this at home or in person.

    Acupuncture

    Studies have shown that acupuncture helped people reduce the amount of cigarettes hey smoked – and in some cases quit completely.

    This journal entry said it might be due to the fact it reduces people’s taste of tobacco and therefore their desire to smoke, while others say it may be due to endorphin release.

    Cutting down

    Quitting smoking is obviously the goal. Starting out, however, you might prefer to cut down the amount you’re smoking.

    The NHS recommend having a full stop date of six weeks away at the latest, and reducing the amount you smoke every day or week until you reach that point. You can use any of the other techniques mentioned to help you get there, or try an e-cigarette in the meantime.

    To work out your personal stop smoking plan, why not use this free Smokefree tool. Alternatively, chat to your GP about quitting.

    MORE: Granddad’s face rebuilt after slicing it in half with chainsaw

    MORE: How to actually be OK with someone not liking you


    Woman giving up smoking through illnessWoman giving up smoking through illness

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    (Picture: Getty/Metro.co.uk)

    In a worst-case scenario you might leave your phone, wallet, or God forbid, passport in the back of an Uber. It happens.

    But who on earth is leaving behind 45 pieces of fried chicken?

    That’s just one of the things that taxi service Uber found in its lost and found collection. Other bizarre discoveries include a cat (yep a live one), dentures, a tooth, a fake skull, a Masonic apron and more.

    Someone even managed to lose a delicious vegan sausage roll and we’re not even sure how it’s possible to let that out of your sight.

    Uber has revealed other strange belongings in its lost and found index which charts the things returned to forgetful riders during journeys they’ve made.

    The company found that the number of items lost peaks during weekends and party occasions.

    So don’t worry, you’re not the only who got sloshed on New Year’s and lost their purse.

    Bizarre items lost in an Uber

    45 pieces of fried chicken

    Painting of The Last Supper

    Fake skull

    Nando’s uniform

    Five toilet rolls

    A cat (yes, a real cat)

    The script of Legally Blonde

    Purple travel potty

    Ukulele

    Smoke machine

    Herbs in a jar

    Partial teeth dentures

    Two vodka cranberry and 20 Sovereign Blue

    An electric scooter

    GCSE art project

    Masonic apron

    Panini maker

    Pewter drinking tankard

    SNES games console

    A KFC meal

    ‘Italian Panettone that’s a present for my niece’

    Vegan sausage roll

    Bros poster

    A tooth

    Uber found that London, Belfast, and Bristol are the UK’s most forgetful cities (measured by comparing the amount of lost items relative to trips).

    Not too surprisingly, Saturday was also found to be the day when most items are reported lost.

    The UK is Europe’s fourth most forgetful country with Ireland coming third. But no country in Europe is more forgetful than the French, who top the list.

    Perhaps unsurprisingly, our most forgetful hour is from midnight to 1 am, and the most commonly forgotten items are phones, wallets, and bags.

    Weirdly though the most commonly lost things during the week include glasses lost on a Monday, headphones lost midweek and laptops, phones, and wallets during the weekend.

    But worry not, passengers who leave their items in an Uber can contact their driver through the app so their possessions can be returned, or contact the customer support team to arrange to retrieve their belongings.

    How to retrieve lost items in an Uber

    1. Open your in-app menu (three lines in the top left corner)
    2. Tap Your Trips to select the trip where you left something
    3. Tap I lost an item and select Contact driver about a lost item
    4. Scroll down, enter your contact phone number. If you lost your mobile, enter a friend’s phone number instead (you can do this by logging into your account on a computer, or using a friend’s phone)
    5. Your phone will ring and connect you directly with your driver’s
    6. If your driver picks up and confirms that your item has been found, coordinate a mutually convenient time and place to meet for its return to you
    7. If your driver doesn’t pick up, leave a detailed voicemail describing your item and the best way to contact you
    8. You can then follow up with the 24/7 support team directly through the app.

    MORE: Mum gives birth to a baby girl in the back of an Uber

    MORE: Uber driver offers menu to let his customers choose what sort of trip they have

    MORE: Mum creates art out of litter she found at the beach and on the streets


    The weird and wonderful items people have left behind in Ubers over the past yearsThe weird and wonderful items people have left behind in Ubers over the past years

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    You might have seen the viral clip of U.S. politician Mitt Romney blowing out his birthday candles.

    When the cake (which is actually just a pile of Twinkies) arrives with the lit candles, he lifts each one out of the cake one at a time and blows each one out individually.

    He later told TMZ, that he had a bit of a cold and he didn’t want to spray germs all over the cake that he was going to share with his colleagues.

    At first, it seems like a strange way to blow out candles – we’re all used to having the cake placed in front of us and blowing as hard as we can in one swoop, with the aim of getting all the candles at once.

    But really, when you think about it – he might be onto something. It is kind of gross when you think about it.

    You are essentially spraying saliva all over a very nice cake.

    A study by Clemson University in South Carolina back in 2017 said that blowing out your candles increases bacteria by 1400%.

    They spread icing evenly over foil and added birthday candles. Test subjects were asked to consume pizza (to stimulate the saliva but also to emulate a birthday party) before the candles were lit and they were asked to blow them out.

    The icing was removed and tested for the level of bacterial contamination, which increased in all samples.

    However, the researchers did say that it’s not the most precise way to count bacteria as each one will not grow on an agar plate.

    They added that even though the results are pretty shocking, most bacteria is not harmful and the cake would still be find to eat, unless the person is ill.

    Saliva everywhere (Picture: Ezra Bailey/Getty)

    Shamir Patel, who is a pharmacist from Chemist 4 U, told Metro.co.uk: ‘While it sounds peculiar (mainly because it’s not normal to do so), blowing each candle out on your birthday cake individually is actually not at all a bad idea.

    ‘Most people produce around 0.75 to 1.5 litres of saliva each day, and when you blow (like you would to blow candles out on your cake) particles of saliva do leave your mouth. Saliva is well known for carrying bacteria and sometimes spreading illnesses, for example, if that person is suffering from a cold. So, when you put two and two together – you can see the hygienic benefits from blowing out each candle away from the cake (which people will inevitably eat) and one by one.

    ‘However, that being said, the level of saliva that’ll leave your mouth from a single blow is minuscule. And it’s not likely that others who you plan to share your birthday cake with would pick any illnesses up, for example, from you blowing out your candles on the cake.

    ‘While it initially looks like one of those revolutionary moments that you realise that ‘oh yes that does seem to carry a lot of questionable hygiene risks’, in reality, it’s not that much of a big deal.

    ‘It’s really down to personal preference and if you’d rather blow each candle out individually. Well, that’s up to you.’

    If you want to avoid spreading germs, Romney’s method is time-consuming and does raise a few eyebrows, particularly if it’s a big birthday and your friends or family are insisting on the exact about of candles for your age.

    But there might be another alternative.

    This video on Youtube claims this is the healthiest way to blow them out – by waving your hand across the top to create enough of a breeze to extinguish the candles.

    You avoid the saliva problem but it’s not quite as time-consuming (which is a problem when you are trying to get them out before the wax falls on your cake) as Romney’s method.

    But then again, does Romney’s method might mean you get a wish for each candle? Because we could all do with more of those.

    Basically, it’s probably still fine to blow out your birthday candles but if you’ve not been feeling well, maybe try one of these alternative ways. Or you can always just keep the whole cake to yourself.

    MORE: Boy’s mid-scream school photo shows exactly how he feels about picture day

    MORE: Seven ways you can try to give up smoking

    MORE: Burns survivor who looked like ‘Frankenstein’s mermaid’ wants to model again to show that ‘life goes on’


    Mixed race woman blowing out birthday candlesMixed race woman blowing out birthday candles

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    Mother-of-the-bride dress
    (Picture: Tonena/Etsy)

    One of the biggest faux pas at weddings is outshining the bride – especially by wearing something that will take attention away from her carefully chosen dress.

    This is especially important for the wedding party, where as a rule bridesmaids should wear unflattering outfits in ugly colours (of course, not all brides adhere to this standard, made popular by romantic comedy storylines).

    Some brides go with unconventional dress codes, such as the one who told her guests to wear dresses from their own special day.

    But, if you show up in this sultry mother-of-the-bride outfit, we’re fairly certain that more than a few heads will turn.

    Mother-of-the-bride dress
    (Picture: Tonena/Etsy)
    Mother-of-the-bride dress
    (Picture: Tonena/Etsy)
    Mother-of-the-bride dress
    (Picture: Tonena/Etsy)

    The sexy dress, made by Bulgarian designer Tonena, is causing a stir on social media – people are in awe over it.

    While not traditional, it certainly is a showstopping number with black sheer panels, feathers and open back.

    The dress also includes adjustable sleeves and a push-up effect on the bust, for a little extra oomph.

    Designer Tonena explained that the open back can be closed up, for those ‘aiming for a more conservative look’.

    Twitter is loving the dress, with many referencing female movie characters (some evil) who would approve, such as Maleficent, Moira Rose from Schitt’s Creek and Cruella de Vil.

    One woman wasn’t too keen and suggested she might have to add the dress to her ‘no-no page’ (just in case guests get inspired).

    Another wrote she would get the dress and ‘chaperone my sons to their first school mixer in a few years’.

    Things got a little morbid too, as one Twitter user said she would use the dress in a ‘funeral plan’.

    Tonena’s floor-length mermaid design will cost you £1,816.17, but she also has plenty of others to choose from including another mother-of-the-bride piece called ‘mobs wife’.

    Love it or loathe it, the gown is definitely controversial on the wedding scene.

    But if the wearer doesn’t mind and the bride doesn’t either, why not go with a sassy black gown instead of a pastel piece?

    We approve.

    MORE: People have fallen in love with Fashion Nova’s £27 wedding dress

    MORE: You can buy a paper shopping bag with a picture of a handbag on for £405

    MORE: Bride tells guests to wear their old wedding dresses for the big day


    Mother of the bride dressMother of the bride dress

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    (Picture: ASOS)

    Ever wanted to model for ASOS? Well, now’s your chance.

    ASOS is currently scouting for new models of all shapes and sizes – including tall, petite and plus.

    They’re looking for people who aren’t currently represented by a modelling agency – meaning there’s nothing holding you back.

    According to ASOS, anyone can apply, as long as you are over the age of 17 and not represented by an agency. You also have to be a UK resident.

    On shape and size, ASOS states: ‘With our talent we aim to reflect and appeal to our diverse and inclusive international customer base. We are looking for all shapes and sizes, from petite to plus-size, or XS to XXXL.’

    All you have to do to apply is submit photographs of yourself and a short video.

    If you’re successful, you will be recruited as one of ASOS’ new faces, and if you are unsuccessful you will find out within two weeks.

    You will be modelling exclusively for ASOS and the ASOS Scout Team will work closely with you to develop your confidence in front of the camera.

    You would primarily be shooting for the product pages at the London head office, featuring in photos and videos and shooting a variety of different products.

    (Picture: ASOS)

    ASOS adds that they’ll make sure not to photograph you in anything you don’t feel comfortable in.

    As mentioned above, ASOS don’t want you to be signed with an agency – so no portfolio or experience is required, either.

    All they need is four natural photos that don’t need to be professional and can be taken on a phone.

    It’s totally free to do and if you do get the job, you will be paid for all shoot days from the trial stage onward – and there’ll be lots of work available as ASOS books more than 30 models a day, Monday to Friday – which means you will need to be available in the week.

    The listing states: ‘If your initial application is successful, you will need to be available to meet us at our London HQ for a casting on a weekday.

    ‘After this, we can discuss how modelling for us may or may not work alongside your current circumstances.’

    As previously stated, ASOS Scout is only open to those living and eligible to work in the UK.

    You can apply through the ASOS scout site. Good luck!

    MORE: If you thought paying 5p for a plastic shopping bag was bad, ASOS is selling one for £15

    MORE: ASOS is selling high visibility builder hoodies that could probably stop traffic


    ASOS is looking to cast new models for the siteASOS is looking to cast new models for the site

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    Aldi Sea Dog Rum
    (Picture: Aldi)

    You’d be forgiven for thinking supermarkets are taking over the spirits industry.

    Last month, Lidl’s £13.49 whisky was voted the best Scotch in the world and in July last year, the Co-op won best vodka.

    Now, it’s Aldi’s turn – the brand’s own label rum was tried and tested at the Spirits Business Rum Masters, a blind tasting competition where industry experts gave the Sea Dog Premium Spiced Rum a gold medal.

    The bottle costs just £16.99 – compare that to another gold winner, Ableforth’s Rumbillion! Navy-Strength which retails at almost three times that, at £45.

    Aldi’s Sea Dog rum was selected for both price value, as well as taste with hints of sweet vanilla, spices, coffee and citrus lime.

    The supermarket also received a silver medal for its Old Hopking Spiced Rum, which costs £10.49.

    Aldi Sea Dog Rum
    (Picture: Aldi)

    This isn’t the first time Aldi has beat competitors with more expensive spirits; last year, its £10 gin was voted better than Waitrose’s Heston Blumenthal bottle (£25).

    ‘We are delighted that our own label rums have excelled once again at an international competition,’ said Julie Ashfield, managing director of buying at Aldi UK.

    ‘Our UK-based buying team are constantly challenging themselves with new and exciting innovation to add to our range, so seeing new products win awards is a real testament to their hard work.

    ‘Rum continues to be a popular product with Aldi shoppers, and in 2018 alone we sold over two million bottles of the spirit. As more shoppers tap into the trend for creating cocktails at home, we’re expecting another great year of sales.’ 

    MORE: This £12.50 supermarket vodka has been voted one of the best in the world

    MORE: A £13.49 Lidl whisky has been voted the best Scotch in the world

    MORE: Aldi’s £10 gin voted better than Waitrose’s Heston Blumenthal version for £25


    Aldi sea dog rum picture; aldi metrograbAldi sea dog rum picture; aldi metrograb

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    Instagram star pose trend how to do
    Nailed it (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

    Most social media trends are started by Instagram influencers or vloggers leveraging their clout and trying to get more.

    These amazing older ladies have absolutely blown their attempts out of the water, though, with their beautiful star pose.

    A video of the women getting a squad photo was posted online last week and – although they aren’t the first to master it – it’s got everyone ready to copy them.

    If the replies to the video are anything to go by, it seems the pose has been used by various bands and groups of friends in the past. The origin isn’t clear, but it’s safe to say we love these sweet ladies showing us how it’s done.

    It’s something you can definitely recreate with your gang, but it won’t be a pose/snap/walk away type deal. It takes a fair amount of time and role allocation, as we found out when we tried it for ourselves.

    The first thing to do is work out who’s going where. What struck us was just how much height differences can affect the overall outcome, so you can combat that with some difficult crouching and squatting.

    You need six people in total, one in the middle, one in front of them, and two at either side one in front of the other. The rest is easier to explain via pictures because this kind of ‘Gramming takes vision.

    Instagram star pose how to do
    (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

    This is how you’ll start. Your middle-back person gets all Kate Winslet, while your two side-back people hook their arms under middle-back’s and create a point at the top.

    You’ll also want your middle-front kneeling or crouching.

    Instagram star pose how to do
    (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

    Next your side-front people come in, and crouch so they’re standing higher than the middle-front, but lower than the side-back people (told you it gets complicated).

    Side-fronts join hands with each other, and with the person behind them. Side-backs put their remaining hand in front of them and link up with the front-middle person.

    It may then take a little while to work out where to position yourself so your arms sit straight and you can all reach. Finally, however, you’ll realise you’re in your swag-summoning star, and can get an innocent bystander to take your picture.

    A star is born.

    MORE: We learned how to do the triangle dance and here’s how you can do it too

    MORE: Aldi’s own brand rum crowned one of the best in the world – and it costs just £16.99


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    (Picture: Getty)

    What do you call the room in your house with the TV and sofa? Is it the sitting room, living room, the family room, or even lounge?

    Well, the answer might depend on your age and social class.

    John Lewis & Partners has published a report entitled The Things We Do In Our Living Rooms (and the things we wish we didn’t) which looked at the different names we have for the communal space in our homes.

    The homeware brand found that living room is the most popular name for it, followed by lounge, but it varies according to your generation.

    The younger you are, the more likely you are to refer to it as the living room, as two-thirds of millennials do. But the older you are, the more likely you are to call it the sitting room.

    If you’re middle-aged (35-54 years) you are most likely to call it the lounge, said the report.

    Despite watching TV being the activity nearly all of us do in this space, only 1% of those asked call it the TV room, and just as few call it the drawing room.

    But the latter is to do with what social class you hail from, shows previous research.

    What do you call the communal room with the TV?

    1. Living room – 39%
    2. Lounge – 30%
    3. Sitting room – 16%
    4. Front room – 5%
    5. Family room – 4%
    6. TV room – 1%
    7. Drawing room – 1%
    8. Other – 4%

    Social anthropologist Kate Fox explored British habits and tendencies in her book Watching The English.

    She found that drawing room (from withdrawing room) used to be the only correct term, but many upper-middle classes and uppers felt it’s a slightly pretentious name for a small room in an ordinary terrace house — so sitting room became acceptable.

    You might also hear an upper-middle-class person say ­living room but this is frowned upon, she found. And only middle-middles and below say lounge.

    The Queen calls hers a drawing room but we imagine hers is much larger than the rest of ours.

    And working class people may refer to it as the front room.

    Interestingly, if you own your home you are more likely to call it a lounge, but someone renting is much more likely to call it the living room.

    Let’s not even get started on the settee, couch or sofa debate though.

    MORE: What I Rent: Shannon, £520 a month to share a two-bedroom flat in Manor House

    MORE: What do you call the game when you knock on someone’s door then run away?

    MORE: Attention, millennials: Waitrose’s avocado Easter egg is back in stores


    Living room with record collectionLiving room with record collection

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    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)

    A gorgeous 17-bedroom French castle is up for auction.

    Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Château de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars.

    Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees.

    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)
    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)

    The castle also features stunning interiors, including original chandeliers, murals, panelling and stone fireplaces.

    It’s also a short drive from the ski slopes of the Pyrenees and the coastal resort of Biarritz is nearby too.

    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)
    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)

    So basically, you’ll be living in a movie. Amazing.

    The castle, which has been valued at €5,000,000 (£4,282,838.03), has been used as a luxury bed and breakfast for more than a decade and is going up for auction with Concierge Auctions without a reserve.

    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)
    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)

    Paulina Kimbel, vice president of business development at Concierge Auctions, said: ‘This is our second sale in the region of Pau and we are delighted to be returning to this picturesque corner of Southwest France.

    ‘Château de Lamothe represents an ideal holiday home for those who love to entertain or a savvy investment opportunity, with the estate already perfectly set-up as a rental property or events space.’

    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)
    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)

    Dating back to the 13th century it was previously the summer residence of the Bishops of Oloran – a former Roman Catholic Diocese dating back to the 6th century.

    The main château features 9,182 square feet of living space including a wood-panelled library, wine cellar, multiple reception rooms, nine bedrooms and a home cinema.

    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)
    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)

    A separate annex includes eight en-suite bathrooms, a bar and more reception rooms.

    There is a secluded swimming pool with terrace, an outdoor kitchen, parking for 12 cars and mature gardens.

    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)
    This stunning 17-bedroom 13th century French chateaux is up for auction -- with no reserve. See SWNS story SWOCcastle; Currently owned by two artists, the 13th century Ch??teau de Lamothe has its own art studio, outdoor kitchen, wine cellar, private cinema and parking for 12 cars. Once the summer residence of the Roman Catholic Bishops of Oloran, the estate has views of the Pyrenees mountains and gardens lined with 400-year-old magnolia trees. The enormous fully-restored castle features original chandeliers, murals, paneling and stone fireplaces, and is a short drive from the ski slopes and the coast.
    (Picture: Relevance Int / SWNS)

    The entire estate has recently been restored, including a complete overhaul of the roofing, wiring, plumbing, and landscaping.

    The property will sell without reserve to the highest bidder on 29 March, and bidding opens on 23 March.

    MORE: A property next to the royal family’s estate is on the market for £750,000

    MORE: A seaside property used in World War II is on the market for £1.5 million


    Stunning 17-bedroom French castle up for auction - with no reserveStunning 17-bedroom French castle up for auction - with no reserve

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    Two business women shaking hands
    (Picture: Getty)

    Does the word ‘networking’ send a shiver of fear down your spine? Us too.

    The term conjures up images of ‘working the room’ in an 80s power suit, sweaty handshakes with balding men, cringe-worthy small talk, vinegary glasses of warm white wine.

    And we don’t love the idea of giving up our extra-curricular hours after work either.

    Why should we sacrifice a precious evening to spend it making painful, stilted conversation with people we don’t even know? Particularly when it’s hard to see what potential benefits it could even have for your career.

    It’s tempting to think that meaningful connections can now be made entirely online. Why leave my house when I can sell myself to potential employers on Twitter and LinkedIn?

    But face-to-face networking is still important. The lasting impression you can make during a physical meeting shouldn’t be underestimated.

    For men, networking comes easily. Many professional men have in-built, natural networks of influential people – through social groups, sports teams, university connections.

    Women have been historically left out of this tradition. There are far fewer organic ways for women to meet, schmooze with and impress other professional women.

    Charlie and two of her close friends decided to set up Artemis – an informal network connecting women across industries – because they want to change the way women think about networking.

    ‘Networking is a much maligned concept for both sexes, I think,’ Charlie tells Metro.co.uk.

    Brunch with the Artemis network
    Artemis holds regular brunches with inspirational speakers and plenty of Prosecco (Picture: Artemis/Metro.co.uk)

    ‘It has become synonymous with awkward cups and saucers, the handshake vs the single or double kiss debate and the late weeknights you have to really rally your energy for.

    ‘Meeting new people is undoubtedly important, but the environment in which you do it can make or break the potential of those encounters. We want to foster informality, intimacy and openness at our events – encouraging a spirit of generosity and support that you’re not likely to find at the conference venue bar.

    ‘I can’t speak for all women, but one of the turn-offs for me when it comes to corporate, traditional networking formats is the perceptible sense of personal agenda that hangs over a large, smartly-dressed crowd.

    ‘I find that lots of the men I know are more comfortable than I am with this expectation.

    ‘I also find that the more open I am to offering my skills, time or contacts, the more I receive; ambition is commendable, but so is the ability to suspend your personal agenda and that’s the expectation we’ve tried to set through Artemis.’

    Charlie and her co-founders are keen to spread the message that networking doesn’t have to be horrible. They think women helping women is the key to professional progression – but to do that, women need to right environment.

    ‘Traditionally, “networking” has been a power term, coined and conceptualised over time by men,’ explains the Artemis team.

    ‘At one end of the spectrum, you let it rain business cards and you show off. At the other end, it’s stuffy rooms, forgettable speakers, and crisps. Lots of crisps.

    ‘You have to bring 110% of your energy to meet-and-greet – there’s no time for tangential conversations and certainly no space for vulnerability.

    ‘Networking must change and evolve for both men and women – so at Artemis we’re all about creating that safe space for like-minded women who are genuinely, selflessly interested in one another.

    Food and flowers at the Artemis networking event
    The menu is always on point (Picture: Artemis/Metro.co.uk)

    It seems to come down to the intrinsic differences in the ways in which men and women communicate.

    ‘Men’s networking is often geared towards selling status and achievements, and so the environments where networking happens don’t often facilitate the best connections between women,’ the team explain.

    ‘This stems from the fact that there are fewer women setting examples from the top of most industries.

    ‘Certainly the three of us want to feel supported and connect on a more emotional level than those events allow – we want to feel a sense of belonging and then rise, supported, to the top, rather than our careers becoming an ongoing competition.’

    There is a false stereotype about professional women – that we are protectionist, unwilling to help, reluctant to share our resources. Charlie and her co-founders know this to be fundamentally untrue and the women who come to their events continue to prove otherwise.

    Charlie introduces the speaker at the Artemis event
    Charlie introduces the speaker (Picture: Artemis/Metro.co.uk)

    ‘One attendee recently thanked us for being “so willing to share our friends”, which surprised us, but maybe it’s true – in a crazy, pacey city of flux, it’s rare that we connect our precious mates to others for fear of losing something stable, and valuable emotional support. Which makes no sense in our time.

    ‘I’m not sure how convinced I am of the hunter-gatherer justification for this tendency; the theory that men had to collaborate and connect with larger groups to maximise their chances of hunting success, while women wanted to divide the fruits of their daily forage with as few as possible – but we’re certainly not foraging anymore.

    ‘There is no finite value in friendship; you multiply it by making an introduction, you don’t halve it.

    ‘We’re not quite there yet in terms of gender equality in the workplace – and we can only achieve that through connecting with each other.

    ‘The more women meet other women, the more they can be inspired and supported to strive for a working life that brings out the best in us.

    When women work together to empower each other, our potential is limitless – and it is this belief that is at the heart of what Artemis is trying to achieve.

    ‘Women have an innate understanding of the investments required in work, family and friendships – we find ourselves speaking the same language when we get together, but that’s not a language currently spoken by most senior management, or reflected in traditional industries and contracts.

    ‘If we move to change that collectively, that’s going to be powerful.’

    MORE: Turning 30 is something to celebrate, so why are women conditioned to feel like it’s a bad thing?

    MORE: How to actually be OK with someone not liking you

    MORE: How to do the star pose – the hottest new squad photo trend


    Two business women shaking handsTwo business women shaking hands

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    This gym manager knows how to treat his customers.

    When CJ, 22, who has Down’s Syndrome, arrived at the gym in Rhode Island, U.S., with his carer Lisa Simpson they realised he was wearing the wrong shoes.

    Initially they thought they had driven the whole way there for nothing and he wouldn’t be able to complete his workout.

    CJ likes having a routine and Lisa and the gym staff knew that changing that would be upsetting for him.

    But after a few minutes, Daniel Cote, the manager of the gym came back with a new pair of trainers.

    He went to a nearby store and picked some up when CJ and Lisa weren’t looking.

    CJ and Lisa were incredibly touched by his kindness.

    Lisa posted the video of the moment on Facebook and explained that it was particularly poignant because she had been having a bad day.

    She said: ‘I have a story that I would like to share with you all. I know you will appreciate it and hold it dear in your heart, as I have.

    METRO GRAB - permission given by Lisa M. Simpson to reporter Act of kindness for gym goer with Down Syndrome https://www.facebook.com/lisa.m.simpson.77?tn-str=*F Picture: Lisa M. Simpson
    (Picture: Lisa M. Simpson)

    ‘Last Monday, I picked up CJ and drove to Planet Fitness. I had not noticed, however, that CJ did not have his sneakers until we were inside at the front desk.

    ‘I put my head in my hands and said “Now what am I going to do?” I had just driven from Burrillville to Woonsocket so we could work out.

    ‘The manager made some suggestions and we went on our way to try a light workout. After a couple of minutes, a staff member came over and asked me CJ’s shoe size.

    ‘I knew if they checked lost and found they would not find his size because he has small feet for a man, so we went about our workout.

    ‘A couple of minutes later, Daniel Cote, the Club Manager, came walking over with a brand new pair of sneakers that he had run out and bought a couple of stores down at Olympia Sports.

    ‘I can not begin to tell you how in awe of this man I am.

    ‘You see, what he did not know was, I was having one of those days. I had somehow left the house without my pocketbook when I went to pick up CJ and I did not realize it until I stopped for gas, saw that my gas cap was frozen, and had no money.

    ‘I could not have bought CJ a pair of sneakers and I didn’t have enough gas to go back to Burrillville for CJ’s sneakers and then back to Woonsocket.

    ‘People like Dan restore my faith in mankind and he is the reason I will drive a little farther to the Planet Fitness.

    ‘CJ and I are so appreciative of every smile and fist bump and we are his biggest fans. This world is a better place with Dan in it and I wanted you to know.’

    Well done Dan. You’ve made us all smile.

    MORE: Boy’s mid-scream school photo shows exactly how he feels about picture day

    MORE: Meet the friends reimagining networking for professional women


    Act of kindness for gym goer with Down SyndromeAct of kindness for gym goer with Down Syndrome

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    Womans hands giving gift or present box decorated white peony flowers on pastel table top view. Flat lay composition for birthday or wedding.
    (Picture: Getty)

    Imagine receiving a gift from someone, and then asking for it back a little later.

    Awkward, uncomfortable and rude – right?

    Well that’s exactly what happened to one bride, who received £160 from her husband’s aunt and uncle. But three months later, they asked for most of it back.

    The bride, from Australia, explained in a closed Facebook wedding group that she had received the card upon opening gifts after her wedding.

    She wrote: ‘This is a short one. After my wedding my husband and I opened gifts and cards.

    ‘I opened a card from my husband’s aunt and uncle and they had written us a £160 cheque.

    ‘We were like ‘whoa, but okay he makes good money’.

    ‘Three months later we get a phone call and the ‘generous’ uncle said he only meant to write a £16 cheque and we need to give him £144 back. Like who does that?!’

    (Picture: Getty)

    Even if he had made the mistake of adding an extra zero to the check, it seems a little lazy to ask for it back three months later – especially as it would have likely been spent.

    Also, the bride explained that her husband’s uncle and aunt do ‘not have money problems’, and the mother-in-law was angry that they had done that to the newlyweds.

    However, to keep the peace, the bride and groom agreed to give the money back – saying that they ‘didn’t want a penny of his money’.

    Which, after that experience is probably fair enough.

    Facebook users agreed that it was totally uncalled for – and also added that £16 as a wedding gift is a bit naff.

    One person said: ‘Wow, I’m speechless. £16 for a wedding gift?!?! Are you kidding me?! Some people have no shame. And to call you and demand the money back! Wow, I can’t even.’

    MORE: Couple perform spectacular aerial first dance while bride is 11 weeks pregnant

    MORE: Bride heartbroken as mother-in-law asks her to disinvite disabled dad to wedding


    Bride is gifted ?160 by a wedding guest ? only for him to ask for most of the money BACK three months laterBride is gifted ?160 by a wedding guest ? only for him to ask for most of the money BACK three months later

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    A serial sperm donor says he only has sex when donating, and never for pleasure.

    Over the last five years, Kyle Gordy has fathered 18 children and currently has seven more babies on the way.

    The 27-year-old, from Los Angeles, has travelled across the country in order to impregnate women who have sought out his sperm.

    Kyle said he always dreamed of having lots of children but never felt compelled to get into a relationship as he is turned off by high divorce rates and the responsibility that comes with monogamy.

    But in 2014, Kyle turned to online classifieds website Craigslist to advertise his sperm and just two weeks later made his very first donation to a local woman via artificial insemination.

    After a successful pregnancy, Kyle said the word spread about his ‘strong sperm’ and soon he was being inundated with requests from lots of different women who were seeking a donation.

    The part-time accountant said: ‘I always wanted to have kids, but I never really wanted to have a relationship.

    **MANDATORY BYLINE Pic by Jonathan Celis/Caters News **- (Pictured: Kyle Gordy) - A serial sperm donor who calls himself a modern day Jesus has revealed he ONLY HAS SEX when donating - but never for pleasure. Over the past five years, serial sperm donor Kyle Gordy has fathered 18 children and currently has seven more babies on the way. The 27-year-old from Los Angeles, California, USA, has travelled across the country in order to impregnate scores of women who have sought out his sperm. Kyle said he always dreamed of having lots of children but never felt compelled to get into a relationship as he is turned off by the high divorce rate and the responsibility that comes with monogamy. SEE CATERS COPY.
    (Picture: Jonathan Celis/Caters News)

    ‘I’ve had a few failed ones and it’s just not something I’ve wanted to do.

    ‘I was going to apply to a sperm bank, but the whole thing just felt so cold and clinical.

    ‘I also didn’t like the fact that you never knew where your sperm goes or what happens to it. I wanted to be more involved.

    ‘I turned to craigslist and advertised my sperm. Within two weeks I was making my first donation.

    ‘Then it just built up from there after I started getting recommendations and followings.

    ‘Kids are a huge responsibility, and I think that is too much for me to handle. So now I can have kids and help women at the same time.

    ‘My sperm is much better than what is in a sperm bank as it’s strong and fresh during the donation, while I also do it all for free.

    ‘The specimens at a bank could be sitting there for years. You don’t really know what you’re getting.

    ‘I have no idea why a woman would want to use a sperm bank when she could just use me.

    ‘People have called me a modern day Jesus, and I have to agree with that.

    ‘I’m very generous and giving, and the fact that I’m Jewish while Jesus was also Jewish.’

    Out of his 18 children and seven current pregnancies, Kyle said that six of these were conceived through natural sexual intercourse.

    He also claims he never has casual sex for pleasure or without the intention of getting a woman pregnant – and the only time he engages in intercourse is for the purpose of donating sperm.

    Over the past five years, Kyle says he has donated to women aged 18 to 42 and across all races.

    He said: ‘Some women don’t want to do artificial insemination as they don’t want to waste time and they feel it will be most effective if we do it the old-fashioned way.

    ‘They will ask if we can just have sex, and I’ll tell them I’m up for it and we exchange STD tests.

    ‘I do like natural insemination as I get to know them more and it feels like a connection.

    ‘It’s also usually more effective than natural insemination.

    Pic by Caters News - (Pictured: Kyle Gordy ) - A serial sperm donor who calls himself a modern day Jesus has revealed he ONLY HAS SEX when donating - but never for pleasure. Over the past five years, serial sperm donor Kyle Gordy has fathered 18 children and currently has seven more babies on the way. The 27-year-old from Los Angeles, California, USA, has travelled across the country in order to impregnate scores of women who have sought out his sperm. Kyle said he always dreamed of having lots of children but never felt compelled to get into a relationship as he is turned off by the high divorce rate and the responsibility that comes with monogamy. SEE CATERS COPY.
    (Picture: Jonathan Celis/Caters News)

    ‘Obviously, I’m a guy, so it is fun to do it that way if we both like each other.

    ‘It could be considered a fringe benefit of what I do, and I enjoy it.’

    While Kyle has only met four of his kids in person, he said he receives updates about all his children.

    Kyle has even created a Facebook group dedicated to the mothers of his children, who use the space to talk with each other and exchange photos of their kids – who are all half-siblings.

    He said: ‘We’re like a little modern family. It’s really nice to see the mum’s all speaking to each other and swapping photos.

    ‘For me, this is so much better than donating to a sperm bank. This way I get pictures, I get to be friends with the mothers and see my kids grow up.’

    Health-conscious Kyle eats organic food while also consuming 18 different herbs and supplements a day to ensure his sperm is in top shape.

    He also claims that he never consumes caffeine, drinks alcohol, uses drugs or smokes cigarettes – while he also gets multiple STD checks throughout the year.

    He said: ‘I need to keep myself healthy, so I have the best sperm. This is really important to me.

    ‘It might seem excessive, but I want to make sure what I’m donating is healthy.’

    In order to make his sperm donations, Kyle has travelled from his hometown of Los Angeles and around California to other US states including Alaska, Colorado, Texas and Kansas.

    Kyle said he does not charge anything for his donations but only asks that his clients compensate him for any expenses involved in the process, such as flight and hotels.

    He also plans travel to Hawaii and even Dubai later in the year – with Australia, the UK and Canada on his wish list.

    He said: ‘My next step is to start donating internationally.

    ‘I’ll keep doing this for as long as I can, but I know I’ll have to stop one day when I get too old.

    ‘But for now, I’m really enjoying it and have no plans of stopping.’

    MORE: People are in awe over this incredibly sexy mother-of-the-bride dress on Etsy

    MORE: Sex tapes, blindfolds, and doing it in a car top people’s sexual bucket lists


    A serial sperm donor who calls himself a modern day Jesus has revealed he only has sex when donating - but never for pleasureA serial sperm donor who calls himself a modern day Jesus has revealed he only has sex when donating - but never for pleasure

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    A card my daughter made for me on mother's day.
    (Picture: Getty)

    A woman has taken to Netmums for some unbiased opionions after her husband decided he wants to go to watch football with his friends on Mother’s Day, instead of spending it with her.

    Rachael has two sons – one is five, and the other a newborn baby.

    She wrote: ‘My husband has just found out that the football team he supports is going to Wembley for the final of some cup (I don’t follow football).

    ‘He wants to go, the problem is it’s on Mother’s Day.

    ‘I’m really upset that he would go and leave me for that weekend especially as it’s the first [Mother’s Day] with the baby.

    ‘I haven’t asked him not to go but have told him I’m a bit upset but he needs to decide for himself if he is going to go or not (he keeps asking me what he should do).

    ‘Just wondered what everyone else would think or if I am silly being upset?’

    Two soccer players challenging for the ball, low angle view.
    (Picture: Getty)

    Since posting, the responses have been very mixed, with some people saying the husband shouldn’t go to the football – while others say Mother’s Day doesn’t really matter.

    One woman said: ‘I don’t see anything wrong with it. It’s not your very first Mother’s Day, and really, it’s just another Sunday but you (hopefully) get a card and a present.’

    Another added: ‘I would be fine with him going and certainly wouldn’t make him feel bad about it. You could always do something nice the following week or like another poster has said, swap Mothers Day and Fathers Day. If he didn’t go, you know he would be constantly checking the score anyway.’

    Someone else wrote: ‘It’s only Mother’s Day! It’s not like it’s Christmas Day or he’s deserting you for weeks on end. It’s a weekend to follow his team who he has a season ticket for.’

    However, others stood up for her.

    One said: ‘Think some of the comments seem a little harsh, especially as she has said she has an 8 week old, which is an emotional time anyway.

    ‘I’d be miffed too, don’t get me wrong, I’d let him go but it would still upset me. As long as we did something special another day I’d be happy with that.’

    (Picture: Getty)

    And another woman put: ‘I’m in the minority here but the way I see it is, what comes first? Partner or football? I would hope the answer would be partner for him and if it’s really bothering you then he should put you first before a sport.’

    Another mother added that she would be really annoyed too, writing: ‘I’m a mum of three and been together with my partner over 11 years.

    ‘I absolutely understand your point here and maybe 5 years ago I would be really peeved off if he decided to go to the football on mothers day.

    ‘It is indeed a day to celebrate and be thankful to mothers across the UK but at the same time, I’m pretty convinced in my own head it was actually created by a card company.’

    Someone else added that she should do something for herself on Father’s Day to get back at him.

    Of course, everyone sees Mother’s Day differently – some think it’s important while others see it as a big deal.

    Here’s to hoping they work it out and both get to enjoy the day.

    MORE: I won’t take the iPad off my toddler, it’s a great parenting tool

    MORE: Nineties baby names are making a comeback, says Mumsnet


    My husband is choosing the footie over spending Mothers Day with me and our new baby, am I right to be upset? - Netmums chatMy husband is choosing the footie over spending Mothers Day with me and our new baby, am I right to be upset? - Netmums chat

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    Clouds around Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa
    Clouds around the roof of Africa (Massimo Mei/Moment/Getty Images)

    Nine celebrities will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to help raise money for this year’s Comic Relief appeal.

    It is the biggest mountain in Africa and has been a popular spot for climbers, particularly for people new to the activity looking for an accessible challenge.

    Despite being a mountain without any climbing required to reach the top, it still has various obstacles to overcome.

    The team took seven days to climb the mountain, tackling altitude sickness and difficult weather to reach the summit.

    It’s not the first time that celebrities have taken on Mount Kilimanjaro to raise funds for the charity, with Fearne Cotton and Gary Barlow among the famous faces who have previously faced the challenge.

    Here is everything you need to know about the mountain and how long it can take to climb.

    What is the height of Mount Kilimanjaro?

    The summit of Kilimanjaro is around 5,895 metres above sea level, which makes it the largest in Africa but way behind the Mount Everest which has a peak of around 8,848 metres.

    It is part of the Eastern Rift mountain range located in Tanzania in Africa and it is the main part of the Kilimanjaro National Park.

    Climbers can often take between five and ten days to reach the top of the mountain, and it is considered a ‘walk-up’ mountain, which means that it doesn’t require any climbing to reach the summit.

    Despite this it remains a difficult mountain to climb with various risks, which means some climbers are not able to reach the top.

    Although five or six days is possible, most climbers are advised to take more time so that they can acclimatise when they reach bigger heights.

    Altitude sickness can be one of the biggest obstacles for climbers, but you body can often acclimatise if you give it enough time.

    The record for the fastest ascent of Kilimanjaro is currently held by Karl Egloff who reached the summit in 4 hours and 56 minutes in August 2014.

    Here are the famous faces climbing Mount Kilamanjio for Comic Relief (Picture: BBC)

    Who is climbing the mountain for Comic Relief?

    Nine different celebrities will be attempting to climb Mount Kilimanjaro

    Shirley Ballas

    Ed Balls

    Anita Rani

    Dani Dyer

    Dan Walker

    Alexander Armstrong

    Osi Umenyiora

    Jade Thirlwall

    Leigh-Anne Pinnock

    Kilimanjaro: The Bigger Red Nose Climb will be on BBC One at 9pm on Wednesday 13 March.

    MORE: Radio 1’s Scott Mills and Chris Stark raise £250,000 for Comic Relief after 24 hour LOLathon

    MORE: Andy from Fyre Fest proves he will take one for the team for Comic Relief


    Clouds around Mount KilimanjaroClouds around Mount Kilimanjaro

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    (Picture: Dan Clarke/ @theDanClarke/ Bernadette Hagans)

    When Bernadette Hagans started experiencing pain in her leg, she thought it was just because she had to climb so many steps to her new top floor flat.

    She had no idea that the pain was actually a cancerous growth in her leg.

    A year later she was diagnosed with a rare cancer of soft tissue, called synovial sarcoma, and she was told she would need an urgent leg amputation to save her life.

    But after learning to walk again with a prosthetic limb, Bernadette has embraced her life as an amputee and has recently been signed by modelling agency Zebedee management.

    Now cancer free, Bernadette hopes that she can help to change the fashion and beauty industry and show that it is ok to be different.

    She tells Metro.co.uk: ‘After my amputation, it felt amazing to be signed with Zebedee. I love everything that they stand for, they’re giving people a chance, no matter what makes them different.

    ‘Being different doesn’t make you wrong, it makes you more unique. I love that I’m being given the chance to work with some incredible people that are creating a change in the industry.’

    Back in 2017, Bernadette, 22, from Belfast, noticed the pain after moving house. She initially thought nothing of it but as the pain got worse, she started to worry.

    She says: ‘I started having pain in my calf at first. I was moving to a top floor apartment at the time and put it down to the stairs.

    Model who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancer Picture: Bernadette Hagans
    Bernadette before her amputation (Picture: Bernadette Hagans)

    ‘Over time the pain was getting worse and was waking me from my sleep. It was a stabbing type of pain, but gradually started to radiate down my leg.

    ‘I started to feel a bump, it was the sort of bump you’d get if you hurt yourself with a bruise on top, but there was no bruise. This got bigger quite quickly. It got to the stage that I was constantly having pain in my leg, finding it hard to walk because short distances made my leg feel dead.’

    Bernadette visited her GP around December of that year. He felt it was unusual so asked for a second opinion.

    The second doctor said it was lipoma – a benign tumour made of fat tissue.

    In the months that followed, the pain continued getting worse and Bernadette kept going back to the doctor.

    By May, she was struggling to stand on her leg and was sent to the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, for an ultrasound.

    When the ultrasound showed that something was wrong, she was sent for an X-Ray and then an MRI so they could see what exactly was in her leg.

    The scans showed that there was a tumour in her leg. She was asked to come in for a biopsy.

    Model who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancer Picture: Bernadette Hagans
    Bernadette in hospital (Picture: Bernadette Hagans)

    Bernadette says: ‘I went to my appointments during my break at work and didn’t tell anyone because I didn’t want them to worry.

    ‘I drove to my biopsy, but was unable to walk after. It was at this stage that I rang my parents and asked them to come get me.

    ‘They asked where I was and I said hospital, they asked why, and I told them I had a tumour. I didn’t tell them the time of my appointment for my results so I went to this alone too. People say I’m strong headed but I just didn’t want anyone to worry.’

    At the appointment on 20 August 2018, Bernadette was told she had a rare and aggressive form of cancer called synovial sarcoma.

    The tumour was tangled around her nerves and blood vessels. Bernadette was told she would need an urgent amputation to save her life.

    Model who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancer Picture: Bernadette Hagans
    Bernadette waking up after surgery (Picture: Bernadette Hagans)

    She explains: ‘I remember making a joke saying that they just wanted another customer for a prosthetic but everyone was trying to be serious.

    ‘I remember my doctor saying it was probably the best someone has ever taken the news of having an aggressive form of cancer.

    ‘I didn’t cry and was still being normal so I was kept behind around an extra hour because they didn’t think I understood. I did though and in my mind, I was already lucky to have my leg for 22 years. There are children that have cancer so I didn’t see the point in getting upset about what was happening to me.

    ‘When I left that appointment, I had texts and missed calls from my parents asking if I had my results or when they were, or what was happening. I text back saying “all good” as I didn’t want them panicking.

    ‘When I saw my parents, we were joking and normal, then I passed them the card that said I had cancer and they panicked straight away. They were saying it was a mistake, I was okay, I didn’t need surgery, it wasn’t really happening.

    ‘They were in denial and that’s when I realised that I didn’t want anyone feeling upset, so I made jokes and I’ve carried on doing that. I figured that if I’m making everyone laugh about it then they’re not crying. ‘

    Bernadette had the operation to amputate her right leg on 30 October last year.

    She explains: ‘I was fine with the idea of amputation. Straight away I knew to be grateful that I had both legs for 22 years, some people are born without.

    Model who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancer Picture: Bernadette Hagans
    After learning to walk again (Picture: Bernadette Hagans)

    ‘I knew that my life was going to change completely, so I tried to live as normally as I could up until my amputation. Then I realised that I was still going to be me, this is who I am. I’m still me even with part of my leg missing.

    ‘I’ve always tried to remain positive because I believe that it’s not what’s happened to me, but how I overcome it. I’m so lucky to have continued support from my nurse and my social worker, Laurena.

    ‘Laurena has gone above and beyond in trying to help me live as normally as I can.’

    The operation took around six hours and Bernadette remained in hospital for eight days after the operation.

    She worked hard with occupational therapists to learn how to do things without her leg.

    In the months that followed, she returned to hospital every week to learn to walk again with a prosthetic leg.

    Bernadette has now become a model (Picture: Brian Rolfe)

    She explains: ‘I learned everything I needed to know fast with my OT’s. I even drove an automatic car with a left accelerator a few days after my surgery.

    ‘I’m regularly at the RDS in Musgrave Park Hospital, where I learned to walk.

    ‘The staff here are so amazing and I enjoyed learning to walk with them. I’m going to be going back here for the rest of my life as my leg changes.

    ‘The staff here really encourage amputees to try their best and I’m so grateful for everything they have done for me.’

    Model who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancer Picture: Dan Clarke/@theDanClarke
    Bernadette has now been signed to a modelling agency (Picture: Dan Clarke/ @theDanClarke )

    Initially, Bernadette was told she would need chemotherapy following her surgery but when the margins from her surgery came back clear, she and her team decided to put learning to walk again first.

    There is still a possibility that she might need chemotherapy but for now she is cancer free.

    Following her recovery, Bernadette has found that her new way of life has led to opportunities.

    After spotting a post on Instagram by Zebedee Management, an agency specilaising in models with disabilities, Bernadette messaged them just to say she loved what they were doing.

    But after speaking to one of the founders Zoe Proctor, they asked Bernadette if she would like to send some pictures of herself.

    Model who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancer Picture: Dan Clarke/@theDanClarke
    She wants to challenge the fashion industry to use a diverse range of models (Picture: Dan Clarke/ @theDanClarke )

    She explains: ‘I spoke with Zoe and she asked me to send her clear photos of me.

    ‘At first I was surprised because I wasn’t expecting it, I wasn’t going to do it because I didn’t see myself as a model.

    ‘I spoke to my parents and they thought I should, and I realised it was an amazing opportunity.

    ‘I started to think about children with amputations that maybe feel like they aren’t as good as someone else, or that they don’t look good.

    ‘I realised that doing this would show that your life doesn’t stop because of an amputation and you can still feel good about yourself. If I can model with an amputation, then it shows that anything is possible for someone else with the same thing.

    ‘I’m so excited to be given the opportunity to create a change. I’m willing to give anything a try and can’t wait to see what the future holds.’

    MORE: Gym manager surprises client who has Down’s Syndrome with new trainers

    MORE: Serial sperm donor says he only has sex to get women pregnant


    Model who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancerModel who had a sudden amputation after developing rare cancer

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    (Picture: Brock Elbank/SWNS)

    A new exhibition celebrates the beauty of people born with a rare and untreatable condition that causes large, dark brown marks to form across their skin.

    The photo series, called How Do You C Me Now, aims to inspire people to love the skin they’re in.

    Brock Elbank, a photographer who previously created a stunning photo series focusing on freckles, gathered men and women who live with the skin condition congenital melanocytic naevus (CMN).

    CMN can cover up to 80% of the body in dark brown birthmarks.

    It’s rare, so those who experience it can often feel isolated. This project brought those with CMN together and focused on the beauty of their condition rather than their difference.

    The exhibition, which is being supported by UK CMN charity Caring Matters Now, will run for ten days at the Oxo Tower Wharf in London before touring globally.

    A spokesperson from Caring Matters Now said: ‘People with CMN often feel isolated due to the rarity of the condition and have to deal with negative comments because of their visible difference, resulting in low self-esteem.

    ‘How Do You C Me Now? aims not only to improve the self-esteem of the children and adults affected by CMN, but also to encourage the public to consider how living with visible differences can add to beauty rather than detract from it.

    ‘In a world where people work hard to stand out from the crowd, ‘How Do You C Me Now?’ aims to celebrate diversity and educate the public about this rare condition”.

    The How Do You C Me Now? exhibition launches at the Oxo Tower Wharf on 13 March with a private viewing, and will open to the public the following day at 10am.

    Frederik Port who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Frederik Port (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    Agnieszka Palyska who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Agnieszka Palyska (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    Gemma Whyatt who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Gemma Whyatt (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    Mariana mendes who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Mariana Mendes (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    Callum White who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Callum White (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    Alkin Emirali who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Alkin Emirali (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    Rosabella Harrison who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Rosabella Harrison (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    Yulianna Yuseff who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    Yulianna Yuseff (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)
    You Kang Wu who has Congenital Melanocytic Naevus and is part of an exhibition featuring other people with the rare skin condition. See SWNS copy SWCAskin: A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition that presents as large, dark brown birthmarks which can cover up to 80% of the body is seeking to challenge conventional perceptions of beauty. A series of 30 portraits showcases people with Congenital Melanocytic Naevus (CMN), a condition which is not inherited and is instead caused by a mutation in the NRAS gene.
    You Kang Wu (Picture: Brock Elbank / Caring Matters Now / SWNS.com)

    MORE: You Don’t Look Sick: ‘My skin condition causes a lot of pain but I gave up my blue badge because of abuse’

    MORE: Student who was told she would ‘never be attractive’ because of her skin condition becomes a lingerie model

    MORE: Photos capture the makeshift ladders people craft for cats in Switzerland


    A photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin conditionA photography exhibition featuring people with a rare and untreatable skin condition

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    (Picture: Disney Park Blogs) The Mac & Cheese Truck will be latest addition to the fleet of food trucks parked on the West Side of Disney Springs, serving up a selection of mouth-watering mac and cheese dishes
    (Picture: Disney Park Blogs)

    Let’s be honest – when you go to Disney World, a big part of the most magical place on earth is the food.

    But while those with a sweet tooth have been satisfied by Mickey Mouse doughnuts and bat wing ice cream, it’s easy for savoury fans to feel a tad left out.

    Well, no more.

    A mac and cheese truck has arrived at Disney World, and it’s a dairy and carb lovers’ delight.

    The Mac & Cheese Truck is a new edition to the food options parked on the west side of Disney Springs, serving up – you guessed it – macaroni cheese.

    But this is not just any mac and cheese. The flavours sound incredible.

    Take your pick from crunchy mac and cheese made with six different cheeses and topped with crunchy cheese puffs, bacon cheeseburger mac and cheese, Italian chicken parmesan mac and cheese with marinara sauce, lobster and shrimp mac and cheese, and smoked brisket mac and cheese.

    (Picture: Disney Park Blogs) The Mac & Cheese Truck will be latest addition to the fleet of food trucks parked on the West Side of Disney Springs, serving up a selection of mouth-watering mac and cheese dishes
    (Picture: Disney Park Blogs)

    Anyone else drooling?

    Each serving of mac and cheese will be handed over in a hefty pot, so the truck’s the perfect place to stop for a meal if you’re hungry after all the rides and hanging out with Mickey and his pals. Disney World is tiring. Carb-heavy food is clearly a necessity.

    If you do happen to be heading to Florida for the food scene, you’ll be pleased to know that other new food trucks are arriving in Disney Springs, too.

    The hot dog shop, B.B. Wold’s Sausage Co, has added new items to the menu, including three foot long hot dogs: the Hawaiian Island dog topped with pineapple salsa, spam, and teriyaki; the New York Pastrami Reuben Dog, and the Texas Chili Cheese Dog. Anyone indecisive can order the Three Little Pigs, which has mini versions of all three hot dogs.

    MORE: Get out the crackers, Sainsbury’s is selling spreadable cheese Easter eggs

    MORE: Man proposes to Minnie Mouse at Disney World and Mickey isn’t impressed

    MORE: Pasta Grannies is the Instagram page to follow to see adorable Italian nans cooking


    Disney World mac and cheeseDisney World mac and cheese

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