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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro

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    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

    Listen up, fans of fancy lingerie: It’s nearly time for the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show.

    In case you aren’t informed on this momentous occasion, the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show is an annual runway show in which hot models walk the catwalk wearing Victoria’s Secret underwear along with massive wings.

    Being selected to walk the runway is a huge deal in the world of modelling, and one that many women strive towards when they first get into the world of fashion.

    There are models that are Victoria’s Secret mainstays, returning year after year, but this year also sees some new faces in the lineup.

    Here’s a list of every single model you can expect to see on this year’s Victoria’s Secret catwalk.

    Well, the ones that have been confirmed so far, anyway. Victoria’s Secret hasn’t yet announced whether some of the usual suspects – Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Karlie Kloss, and Martha Hunt, to name a few – will pop up on the day.

    Here are the models we know will walk the runway this year:

    NEWBIES

    Duckie Thot

    (Picture: Gotham/GC Images)

     

    Winnie Harlow

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Iesha Hodges

    (Picture: Gotham/GC Images)

     

    Herieth Paul

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Kelsey Merritt

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Yasmin Wijnaldum

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Maia Cotton

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Alexina Graham

    (Picture: Edward Berthelot/Getty Images)

     

    Cheyenne Maya Carty

    (Picture: Gotham/GC Images)

     

    Sadie Newman

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    Lorena Rae

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Isilda Moreira

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    Sofie Rovenstine

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Myrthe Bolt

    (Picture: Gotham/GC Images)

     

    Alannah Walton

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Mélie Tiacoh

    (Picture: Daniel Zuchnik/GC Images)

     

    Josie Canseco

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    Mayowa Nicholas

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    RETURNING MODELS

    Bella Hadid

    (Picture: Michele Crowe/CBS via Getty Images)

     

    Shanina Sheik

    (Picture: Getty)

     

    Kelly Gale

    (Picture: Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Victoria’s Secret)

     

    Leomie Anderson

    (Picture: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Victoria’s Secret)

     

    Barbara Palvin

    (Picture: Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images)

     

    Devon Windsor

    (Picture: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

     

    Georgia Fowler

    (Picture: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

     

    Gizele Oliveira

    (Picture: Michele Crowe/CBS via Getty Images)

     

    Grace Bol

    (Picture: Taylor Hill/WireImage)

     

    Cindy Bruna

    (Picture: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

     

    Barbara Fialho

    (Picture: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Victoria’s Secret)

     

    Megan Williams

    (Picture: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Victoria’s Secret)

     

    Frida Aasen

    (Picture: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Victoria’s Secret)

     

    Estelle Chen

    (Picture: Taylor Hill/WireImage)

     

    Maggie Laine

    (Picture: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

     

    Toni Garrn

    (Picture: Randy Brooke/WireImage)

     

    Alanna Arrington

    (Picture: Taylor Hill/WireImage)

     

    Jourdana Phillips

    (Picture: Michele Crowe/CBS via Getty Images)

    MORE: Model Devon Windsor criticised for ‘tone-deaf’ comments on diversity

    MORE: Victoria’s Secret model can code and doesn’t have time for trolls

    MORE: The next big trend is wearing your jacket as a top


    Victoria's Secret Casting SightingsVictoria's Secret Casting SightingsellencscottVictoria's Secret Casting SightingsVictoria's Secret Casting Sightingsellencscott

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    (Picture: METRO GRAB FACEBOOK)

    Have you ever noticed a bunch of small globs floating in an unopened bottle of olive oil?

    If you have, there’s no need to bin the bottle.

    Liza, from Maryland, who runs a page called (a)Musing Foodie, shared a picture of a brand new bottle of olive oil, with the caption: ‘This is a brand new, unopened bottle of Carlini extra virgin olive oil. It’s really cloudy, with floaty things.

    ‘Normal? I’ve never noticed this before.’

    She later updated her status with a pro tip for others who’ve found ‘floaties’ in their olive oil.

    ‘I let the olive oil sit for 90 minutes at room temp, and it is now perfectly clean!

    ‘Sounds like cold storage was the culprit, and I now have a bottle of perfectly fine olive oil on my hands. Yay!’

    The small lumps that can be found floating in bottles of extra virgin olive oils are actually natural wax pellets and they’re perfectly harmless.

    Like lots of other fruits, olives have a waxy coating on their skins to protect them from insects who want to feast on their juicy flesh.

    When the olive and its wax coating are pressed into olive oil, cold temperatures cause the wax to clump together.

    The congealed wax can look like small white particles floating in the jar or gathering at the bottom of it.

    Customers who don’t know that these ‘floaties’ are natural and harmless may avoid bottles with lumps in them, so producers tend to ‘winterise’ their products to stop the process of wax congealing in colder temperatures.

    Unfortunately, the side effect of this is that the flavour of winterised olive oil is much less rich than that of non-winterised oil.

    If you’ve got a bottle of unopened olive oil with white bits floating in it, you’ll get a stronger, more intense flavour.

    To get rid of the white particles, simply leave the bottle out at room temperature and they should melt away.

    Don’t fear the floaties – they just mean your olive oil is going to be tastier.

    MORE: One in five young adults think we will all be vegans by 2030

    MORE: Carlsberg ditches plastic can rings in favour of recyclable glue


    What are the 'floaties' in olive oil?What are the 'floaties' in olive oil?hpwilliamsonWhat are the 'floaties' in olive oil?What are the 'floaties' in olive oil?hpwilliamson

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    **ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new blogger
    (Picture: Phebe Lou Morson for Metro.co.uk)

    Prince William is launching a website to support mental health in the workplace, offering employers training, information and resources to promote wellbeing.

    The Mental Health at Work project has been created with mental health charity Mind, and will act as a web portal that will help managers to support staff who may be struggling.

    It comes after a study by Mind revealed that 48% of British workers have experienced a mental health problem in their current job.

    The survey of 44,000 employees also found that only half of those who had experienced poor mental health at work had spoken to their employer about it – suggesting that 25% of UK workers are struggling in silence.

    The website will be open to all businesses and will be funded by the Royal Foundation, the philanthropic enterprise run by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

    Metro.co.uk spoke to people who have suffered with mental illness in the workplace, to find out just how much websites like these are needed.

    Kate* a radiology assistant, suffers with emotionally unstable personality disorder (also known as EUPD or BPD). She has erratic mood swings, depression, social anxiety and anxiety attacks.

    Caption: Why I'm quitting teaching Picture: Ph?be Lou Morson Phebe
    (Picture: Phébe Lou Morson)

    As she works for the NHS, she had to declare her illness to an occupational health doctor – however, this doctor advised her not to declare it to her boss.

    She said: ‘The first thing people do is Google conditions they’re not familiar with and Google doesn’t give an accurate description of who I am… most of the time people reading the information online would assume I’m a cat killing, manipulative monster.’

    Going against the advice, Kate decided to open up to her boss – but says she has been left feeling like an inconvenience.

    She said: ‘I admit that my sickness levels are higher than the average employee. Not only do we get physical illnesses, but those with mental health issues also have the symptoms of mental health conditions on top of that.

    ‘I dread ringing work to tell them I am not fit enough to work due to mental health. I struggle to make telephone calls anyway but to tell somebody that I’m taking time off because of something that isn’t physical makes it 100 times harder.

    ‘The return to work meetings also terrify me. Having to justify myself to a manager that knows next to nothing about my illness or me as a person is humiliating and difficult to explain to a non MH sufferer.’

    Kate says that in the past she has been given written warnings for her sickness levels.

    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    She says: ‘A point I cannot stand about my current position is that we have to request annual leave at least 6 weeks in advance. If my mental health takes a downhill, I know I either have to take sickness or wait at least 6 weeks for a break.

    ‘I feel that the employment system in most industries is flawed.

    ‘In an ideal world, people with mental health disabilities (those diagnosed) should have a sickness allowance for physical illness and a separate allowance for mental health/disability.

    ‘I thought that working for the NHS people would be more understanding and caring, but behind the scenes the employees are just numbers there to get a job done.’

    James* is currently a freelancer working in film and TV. He was a theatre technician before he had a breakdown.

    James suffers with depression, which causes him a constant low mood, exhaustion, insomnia and intrusive thoughts.

    He said that when working at the theatre, he was overworked and underpaid, working between 40 and 90 hours a week. His holiday requests were often rejected, and he felt he was unable to keep up with the ‘constantly increasing demands’ put on him.

    He said: ‘My line managers only cared what they could get out of me, partly I suspect because they were under pressure from above to constantly provide more results with fewer resources.

    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    ‘I never took sick days even when I was physically ill, and the idea of taking a day for mental health reasons was laughable; it would simply never have been considered.

    ‘My line manager was ex-military and didn’t really consider mental illness to be a real thing – he joked about it in very disparaging terms, which made me even more keen to hide my condition.’

    James says he’s very private about his mental illness and is scared to open up out of fear of being judged and abandoned.

    He didn’t open up to his former boss because he didn’t trust him and he knew ‘he would be disgusted’.

    ‘He’d said as much in conversation that touched on the subject,’ James said.

    ‘I once confessed to the theatre’s Artistic Director that I have a depressive disorder because I was struggling so badly at the time that I was failing to hide it.

    ‘She professed sympathy but did nothing and showed no interest in actually helping or being supportive in any real sense – in fact she turned the conversation to herself and how difficult things were for her.

    ‘I had been working at the venue full time for almost five years and it was the first time I’d tried to be open about my mental health with anyone from management. I didn’t try again, and there were no offers of support at the time or since.’

    metro illustrations
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

    James ended up having a breakdown, and turned in his resignation to his boss in tears – but he says the boss’ main concern was trying to get James to work his notice and accept a lower payout for the hours worked.

    ‘I almost took my own life on six separate occasions in the three months that followed, and lost myself in drugs, self-harm and isolation,’ said James.

    ‘As long as we remain a profit/money-focused society, people with mental illnesses will continue to be seen as less than those without.

    ‘The same applies to people with any disability – providing for us eats into profit, so there is a huge motivation for companies not to put themselves in that position in the first place by hiring us.

    ‘Employers could help people with mental illnesses by providing support, offering mental health sick days (without judgement), flexible working hours, and promoting a culture of actually caring about employees’ wellbeing instead of only about their productivity.’

    Anne Payne, co-founder of the mental health and employee wellbeing consultancy, Validium, explains how an employee can go to their boss to talk about their mental health.

    She told us: ‘When it comes to opening up to work about a mental health issue, ask your manager, or someone in HR, if you can have a quiet word in much the same way that you would if you had a physical or personal issue affecting you.

    ‘Instead of giving them your full diagnosis or mental health history, focus on how your condition is affecting you at work and give specific examples. For example, instead of just saying “I’ve got OCD” explain that you have an anxiety disorder that’s particularly affected by situations where you feel responsible for the safety of other people or things.

    (Picture: Mmuffin for Metro.co.uk)

    ‘Give specific examples of how this is affecting you at work and which situations and responsibilities you’re finding most difficult.

    ‘Explain what you’re doing to alleviate your situation, be this relaxation and breathing techniques or behavioural therapies such as CBT, and ask your manager what they can do to support you.’

    Anna adds that employers have a legal duty of care to look after their employees.

    She continued: ‘Once they know which situations are making you very anxious they should consider making reasonable adjustments, such as reducing some of the responsibilities you find particularly challenging while you go through your therapy, allowing you more time to complete certain tasks or partnering you with a colleague who can step into customer facing situations if you need a moment to get your anxiety under control.’

    Richard Holmes, Director of Wellbeing at Westfield Health, says it’s very important that employers recognise the scale of the problem and act now – or they risk employees continuing to suffer in silence.

    He told Metro.co.uk: ‘Our recent study shows 86% of working UK adults believe companies are not doing enough to support them with work-related mental health issues.

    ‘Whilst this is a widespread issue, it isn’t one that can’t be solved. It needs to start from the top, with employers engraining an open and honest culture in the workplace.

    ‘Employees need to feel they have a comfortable platform at work, to speak honestly and in confidence with their peers.

    ‘Line managers should be the first port of call. They should be trained on how to be approachable, and understand their peers’ individual strengths and weaknesses. Staff should always feel they have someone they can talk to, honestly but informally.’

    Richard adds that it’s important to remember line managers are not experts in mental health – and aren’t expected to be a counsellor.

    But, if they feel they cannot offer correct advice, they have a duty to share any issues with the appropriate person – at the employee’s discretion.

    He added: ‘In addition, employers should consider introducing initiatives such as Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training, which is the equivalent of a physical first aider at work. Mental health resilience training will also provide support to employees on how to manage their own stress levels.’

    Need support? Contact the Samaritans

    For emotional support you can call the Samaritans 24-hour helpline on 116 123, email jo@samaritans.org, visit a Samaritans branch in person or go to the Samaritans website.

    MORE: What are the signs someone might be suicidal and how you can help save a life?

    MORE: Sleep may impact university performance as much as binge-drinking or using drugs


    **ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new blogger**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new bloggerhattiegladwellmetroCaption: Why I'm quitting teaching Picture: Ph?be Lou Morson Phebemetro illustrationsmetro illustrationsmetro illustrations**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new blogger**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new bloggerhattiegladwellmetroCaption: Why I'm quitting teaching Picture: Ph?be Lou Morson Phebemetro illustrationsmetro illustrationsmetro illustrations

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    Gingerbread gin Provider: Asda/ Getty
    (Picture: Asda/Getty)

    Autumn is here, which means it’s finally time for jumpers, boots, and the pumpkin spice latte.

    Asda is getting in on the autumn spirit by releasing a limited-edition Extra Special Gingerbread Gin Liqueur – which is gold and filled with sparkles.

    Yes, this gin is literally perfect for your #autumn Instagram photos.

    The gin is an orange-y gold and comes with a shimmering, pearlescent edible glitter.

    Gingerbread gin Provider: Asda
    (Picture: Asda)

    Apparently, it’s the ‘perfect way to add a touch of sparkle to cocktails whilst snuggled-up at home, with the gin an ideal addition to bubbly’.

    The gin was created combining Asda’s Extra Special Triple Distilled Premium Gin with the flavour of lightly-spiced, home-baked gingerbread.

    It’s meant to be served over ice, with either some tonic or added to a glass of fizz.

    50cl bottles of the gin are priced at £12, and are available now.

    (Picture: Asda)

    Asda is expecting the gin to fly off its shelves in the run-up to the festive party season – with a record number of bottles of gin having been sold last year, with sales hitting £51 million.

    Ed Sowerby, Spirits Product Manager at Asda, said: ‘As the sun sets on summer, we’ve been looking for the perfect warming flavour for the cooler months, and think we’ve found it with the gorgeously glittery Extra Special Gingerbread Gin Liqueur.

    ‘We know gin continues to be a firm favourite with our customers, especially around the festive season as gifts or simply for sipping, so we’re proud of the innovation which has gone into creating our latest spirit.’

    MORE: BEAUTY BAY launching vegan-friendly and cruelty free cosmetics brand

    MORE: Coca-Cola launches pink cans of Diet Coke for Breast Cancer Awareness Month


    Gingerbread GinGingerbread GinhattiegladwellmetroGingerbread gin Provider: Asda/ GettyGingerbread gin Provider: AsdaGingerbread GinGingerbread GinhattiegladwellmetroGingerbread gin Provider: Asda/ GettyGingerbread gin Provider: Asda

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    The t-shirt Kelechi Okafor wore on BBC One's breakfast show. (Picture: reenboxshop.us)
    The t-shirt Kelechi Okafor wore on BBC One’s breakfast show. (Picture: reenboxshop.us)

    On the BBC One Breakfast show this morning, Kelechnekoff Fitness founder, podcast creator and actor Kelechi Okafor rocked a T-shirt with a powerful slogan.

    It read: ‘Why be racist, sexist, homophobic or transphobic when you could just be quiet?’

    Okafor was discussing the depiction of Serena Williams in an Australian News Corp paper, the Herald Sun, which has widely been condemned as racist, harking back to dehumanised depictions of black people that were particularly popular during the Jim Crow era.

    Her performance on the Breakfast Show was lauded by users on Twitter as ‘brilliant’ and ‘eloquent’, and her T-shirt got its fair share of praise too.

    Arts venue New Art Exchange tweeted: ‘The brilliant @kelechnekoff, was on BBC Breakfast this morning! Wearing the best T-shirt we’ve ever seen’ and one user shared a screen grab of herself ordering the T-shirt online.

    The shirt makes a bold statement about bigotry and marginalisation and went viral in 2017 after it was worn by Frank Ocean at the Panorama Music Festival.

    The slogan was originally taken from a 2015 tweet by 18-year-old Brandon Male that caught the attention of Kayla Robinson, who decided to take Male’s words offline and print them on a shirt.

    If you’re in love with Kelechi’s T-shirt, you can buy it from Green Box Shop, a US independent retailer that specialises in social justice slogans for $18.99 (£14.62).

    Okafor confirmed on Twitter that this is where she bought her shirt.

    The T-shirt is also available in five colours, including yellow, pink and baby blue, from Amazon for $16.95 (£13.05) with free shipping.

    Budget shopping app Wish is offering the tee for just £11 not including shipping or VAT.

    If you’re keen to make a statement about your opposition to forms of discrimination like sexism, racism, homophobia and transphobia, this T-shirt will sum things up very neatly.

    Dubbed the ‘rare political T-shirt that doesn’t suck’, the shirt’s simplicity of design and clear, easy to understand message makes it the ideal choice for shutting down bigotry and spreading a message of tolerance.

    Thank you Kelechi for giving us serious T-shirt envy.

    MORE: Model Devon Windsor criticised for ‘tone-deaf’ comments on diversity

    MORE: French model Thylane Blondeau, once called the ‘most beautiful girl in the world’, is launching her own clothing line


    Here's where you can get Kelechi Okafor's amazing anti-bigotry t shirtHere's where you can get Kelechi Okafor's amazing anti-bigotry t shirthpwilliamsonThe t-shirt Kelechi Okafor wore on BBC One's breakfast show. (Picture: reenboxshop.us)Here's where you can get Kelechi Okafor's amazing anti-bigotry t shirtHere's where you can get Kelechi Okafor's amazing anti-bigotry t shirthpwilliamsonThe t-shirt Kelechi Okafor wore on BBC One's breakfast show. (Picture: reenboxshop.us)

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    The Queen was on the FROW with Anna Wintour during Feburary's London Fashion Week. (Picture: EPA/TOLGA AKMEN)
    The Queen was on the FROW with Anna Wintour during Feburary’s London Fashion Week. (Picture: EPA/TOLGA AKMEN)

    It’s the biannual highlight of the London calendar for fashion bloggers, buyers, editors, ‘influencers’ and industry insiders, and the perfect time to get papped in your most questionable (sorry, fashion forward) outfit.

    The event runs from Friday 14 September to Tuesday 18 September, and is held in the British Fashion Council (BFC) Show Space and Presentation Space on the Strand.

    Shows don’t tend to be open to the general public, but plenty of shows are being livestreamed.

    We’ve created a handy guide of the most exciting shows that you shouldn’t miss if you’re a high fashion aficionado.

    Friday –  Richard Malone

    A daring mix of textures and prints from Richard Malone. (Picture: Getty)
    A daring mix of textures and prints from Richard Malone. (Picture: Getty)

    Irish designer Richard Malone might be only 26, but he’s already been awarded the Deutsche Bank Award for Fashion, previously won by Christopher Kane, and has been hailed by British Vogue as a ‘remarkable talent’.

    His previous two London Fashion Week shows have been highly successful, showcasing his unique blend of rebelliousness and careful attention to detail.

    Influences from Malone’s hometown of Wexford in Ireland are clearly present in his use of colour, and his commitment to sustainably sourced fabrics and natural dyeing firmly situate him as part of a new generation of talent with an awareness of fashion’s impact on the planet.

    Saturday – Anya Hindmarch

    Anya Hindmarch. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss
    Anya Hindmarch’s distinctive creative style. (Picture: Getty)

    British powerhouse Anya Hindmarch has grown her business into a massive global brand since its inception in 1897.

    Hindmarch was the first accessories designer to hold an on-schedule London Fashion Week show, and her LFW offerings have since been celebrated for their opulence and creativity.

    Think huge male choirs, giant Rubik’s cubes and models floating over the catwalk instead of walking on it.

    If past shows are anything to go by, Hindmarch’s catwalk on Saturday is going to be spectacular.

    Sunday – Victoria Beckham

    ** SEEK PERMISSION BEFORE USE ** Victoria Beckham TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF PHOTOGRAPHY USAGE PUBLICATION: ?????? PHOTOGRAPHER: Mikael Jansson TERRITORY: UK SOURCE: Vogue (October 2018) PHOTOS: 2 inset images of the Beckham?s USAGE: One use only PUBLICATION DATE: Strictly embargoed until 00:01am on Tuesday 4th September 2018 TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. The Publisher shall publish the photographs under the licence hereby granted in the publication not later than the publication date; if the Publisher fails to do so the licence shall automatically terminate at the end of the publication date and in that event CNP shall be entitled to receive and to retain the agreed fee and thereafter to license publication of the photograph in any other publication. 2. The Publisher shall not alter, cut or add to the photographs without the prior consent of CNP. 3. The accompanying text will be wholly positive regarding the originating magazine (Vogue) and the subject. 4. The Publisher shall run the Vogue October 2018 issue cover alongside a minimum 2 inches tall. 5. The Publisher shall run in full the credit line: ?See the full feature in the October issue of Vogue, available on digital download and on newsstands Friday 7th September? 6. The Publisher shall print alongside each photograph a credit to the photographer Mikael Jansson. 7. The images supplied can only appear online simultaneously with appearing in print. Images supplied cannot only be reproduced online. Images used online must have a Vogue watermark and must be reproduced to the terms of this contract. Online articles must link directly to: http://www.vogue.co.uk/ 8. If the Publisher for whatever reason omits to publish either or both CNP's and/or the photographer's credits it hereby agrees to publish with the photograph, the publisher agrees to pay within 28 days of receipt of an invoice from CNP, fee to be agreed. 9. Should image(s) be reproduced on the front page of the newspaper, the Publisher will seek additional permissions from CNP and a headline reference to Vogue must appear alongside (not just a gutter credit). 10. All photographic material supplied by CNP must be returned to CNP in perfect condition, and any scanned copies removed from your databases. Failure to return or damage of material will result in a fee of up to ?1000 per item. 11. The licence hereby granted shall not be assignable by the Publisher and the Publisher shall not be authorised to grant any sub-licence in relation to the text / photograph. 12. This agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English law and the parties hereby submit to the jurisdiction of the English High court, and /or the Mayor's and city of London court.
    Victoria Beckham for Vogue (Picture: Mikael Jansson/Vogue)

    Victoria Beckham has come a long way from her days as Posh Spice.

    She’s been running her luxury fashion label for a decade and has garnered critical acclaim from the notoriously tough to impress fash pack.

    Victoria Beckham will join the London Fashion Week roster for the very first time as a celebration of the brand’s 10 year anniversary.

    Sunday – Jenny Packham

    Jenny Packham. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss
    One of Jenny Packham’s red carpet-worthy designs. (Picture: Getty)

    Jenny Packham, best known for her ready-to-wear and bridal collections, can be seen on red carpets all over the world.

    The designer has dressed some of the most influential women in film, music and public life, including Kate Winslet, Emily Blunt, Taylor Swift, the Duchess of Cambridge, and Angelina Jolie.

    The label was launched in 1988 and is established as one of the most successful independent British brands.

    Monday – Rejina PYO

    REJINA PYO. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss
    Tweed from REJINA PYO. (Picture: Getty)
    Rejina Pyo, originally from Seoul, received the prestigious Han Nefkens Award for her final Central Saint Martins collection.
    Before creating her own brand, Pyo worked as a designer for established London labels Roksanda Illincic and Christopher Raeburn.
    Pyo’s garments prioritise quality, wearability and the magic of the everyday ritual of dressing.

    Monday – Burberry

    Adwoa Aboah for Burberry. (Picture: Pixelformula/SIPA/REX/Shutterstock)
    (Picture: Getty)

    ‘Quintessentially British’ fashion house Burberry’s new commitment to sustainability and going fur-free is very much in-line with London Fashion Week’s new pledge to keep animal skins off the runway.

    With Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci at the helm, we can expect to see more diversity on the catwalk and a greater engagement with social issues from the brand.

    Monday – Christopher Kane

    Christopher Kane. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss
    A dazzling ensemble from Christopher Kane. (Picture: Getty)

    Christopher Kane’s show is not one to miss at this September’s London Fashion Week.

    After graduating from Central Saint Martins in 2006, Kane began to immediately build on his successful MA collection which had already won awards and captured the imagination of the fashion press.

    He has consolidated his reputation as a skillful and innovative designer who plays expertly with the concept of femininity, and his shows are recognised as a major highlight of the LFW schedule.

    Tuesday – Richard Quinn

    Richard Quinn, London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss
    Richard Quinn’s distinctive florals. (Picture: Getty)

    Lewisham-born Richard Malone only established his eponymous label in 2016, but it has quickly established the Londoner as one of Britain’s most exciting and bold new designers.

    Malone graduated with an MA in Fashion from Central Saint Martins and has since chosen to focus on womenswear and textiles.

    Expect interesting fabrics, striking patterns and a commitment to sustainability.

    MORE: Model Devon Windsor criticised for ‘tone-deaf’ comments on diversity

    MORE: Burberry has finally ditched fur – but faux fur has its own problems too


    Burberry Prorsum - Runway - LFW FW15Burberry Prorsum - Runway - LFW FW15hpwilliamsonThe Queen was on the FROW with Anna Wintour during Feburary's London Fashion Week. (Picture: EPA/TOLGA AKMEN)A daring mix of textures and prints from Richard Malone. (Picture: Getty)Anya Hindmarch. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss** SEEK PERMISSION BEFORE USE ** Victoria Beckham TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF PHOTOGRAPHY USAGE PUBLICATION: ?????? PHOTOGRAPHER: Mikael Jansson TERRITORY: UK SOURCE: Vogue (October 2018) PHOTOS: 2 inset images of the Beckham?s USAGE: One use only PUBLICATION DATE: Strictly embargoed until 00:01am on Tuesday 4th September 2018 TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. The Publisher shall publish the photographs under the licence hereby granted in the publication not later than the publication date; if the Publisher fails to do so the licence shall automatically terminate at the end of the publication date and in that event CNP shall be entitled to receive and to retain the agreed fee and thereafter to license publication of the photograph in any other publication. 2. The Publisher shall not alter, cut or add to the photographs without the prior consent of CNP. 3. The accompanying text will be wholly positive regarding the originating magazine (Vogue) and the subject. 4. The Publisher shall run the Vogue October 2018 issue cover alongside a minimum 2 inches tall. 5. The Publisher shall run in full the credit line: ?See the full feature in the October issue of Vogue, available on digital download and on newsstands Friday 7th September? 6. The Publisher shall print alongside each photograph a credit to the photographer Mikael Jansson. 7. The images supplied can only appear online simultaneously with appearing in print. Images supplied cannot only be reproduced online. Images used online must have a Vogue watermark and must be reproduced to the terms of this contract. Online articles must link directly to: http://www.vogue.co.uk/ 8. If the Publisher for whatever reason omits to publish either or both CNP's and/or the photographer's credits it hereby agrees to publish with the photograph, the publisher agrees to pay within 28 days of receipt of an invoice from CNP, fee to be agreed. 9. Should image(s) be reproduced on the front page of the newspaper, the Publisher will seek additional permissions from CNP and a headline reference to Vogue must appear alongside (not just a gutter credit). 10. All photographic material supplied by CNP must be returned to CNP in perfect condition, and any scanned copies removed from your databases. Failure to return or damage of material will result in a fee of up to ?1000 per item. 11. The licence hereby granted shall not be assignable by the Publisher and the Publisher shall not be authorised to grant any sub-licence in relation to the text / photograph. 12. This agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English law and the parties hereby submit to the jurisdiction of the English High court, and /or the Mayor's and city of London court.Jenny Packham. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't missREJINA PYO. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't missAdwoa Aboah for Burberry. (Picture: Pixelformula/SIPA/REX/Shutterstock)Christopher Kane. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't missRichard Quinn, London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't missBurberry Prorsum - Runway - LFW FW15Burberry Prorsum - Runway - LFW FW15hpwilliamsonThe Queen was on the FROW with Anna Wintour during Feburary's London Fashion Week. (Picture: EPA/TOLGA AKMEN)A daring mix of textures and prints from Richard Malone. (Picture: Getty)Anya Hindmarch. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss** SEEK PERMISSION BEFORE USE ** Victoria Beckham TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF PHOTOGRAPHY USAGE PUBLICATION: ?????? PHOTOGRAPHER: Mikael Jansson TERRITORY: UK SOURCE: Vogue (October 2018) PHOTOS: 2 inset images of the Beckham?s USAGE: One use only PUBLICATION DATE: Strictly embargoed until 00:01am on Tuesday 4th September 2018 TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. The Publisher shall publish the photographs under the licence hereby granted in the publication not later than the publication date; if the Publisher fails to do so the licence shall automatically terminate at the end of the publication date and in that event CNP shall be entitled to receive and to retain the agreed fee and thereafter to license publication of the photograph in any other publication. 2. The Publisher shall not alter, cut or add to the photographs without the prior consent of CNP. 3. The accompanying text will be wholly positive regarding the originating magazine (Vogue) and the subject. 4. The Publisher shall run the Vogue October 2018 issue cover alongside a minimum 2 inches tall. 5. The Publisher shall run in full the credit line: ?See the full feature in the October issue of Vogue, available on digital download and on newsstands Friday 7th September? 6. The Publisher shall print alongside each photograph a credit to the photographer Mikael Jansson. 7. The images supplied can only appear online simultaneously with appearing in print. Images supplied cannot only be reproduced online. Images used online must have a Vogue watermark and must be reproduced to the terms of this contract. Online articles must link directly to: http://www.vogue.co.uk/ 8. If the Publisher for whatever reason omits to publish either or both CNP's and/or the photographer's credits it hereby agrees to publish with the photograph, the publisher agrees to pay within 28 days of receipt of an invoice from CNP, fee to be agreed. 9. Should image(s) be reproduced on the front page of the newspaper, the Publisher will seek additional permissions from CNP and a headline reference to Vogue must appear alongside (not just a gutter credit). 10. All photographic material supplied by CNP must be returned to CNP in perfect condition, and any scanned copies removed from your databases. Failure to return or damage of material will result in a fee of up to ?1000 per item. 11. The licence hereby granted shall not be assignable by the Publisher and the Publisher shall not be authorised to grant any sub-licence in relation to the text / photograph. 12. This agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English law and the parties hereby submit to the jurisdiction of the English High court, and /or the Mayor's and city of London court.Jenny Packham. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't missREJINA PYO. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't missAdwoa Aboah for Burberry. (Picture: Pixelformula/SIPA/REX/Shutterstock)Christopher Kane. London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't missRichard Quinn, London Fashion Week highlights that you definitely shouldn't miss

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    (Picture: Metro.co.uk)

    We’ve all had fear instilled in our hearts by the threat of tech neck.

    Either you’ve been haunted by a lingering soreness or you’ve felt lectured by experts telling you to stop bloody craning your neck to gaze upon your phone. Either way, it all sounds very scary and painful – even if experts have said it really isn’t the epidemic people warned it was – and the fear of our neck getting bent out of shape is almost enough to put us off using handheld technology at all hours of the day. Almost.

    But while most of us are conscious of the pain, soreness, and damage to your posture tech neck can cause, we might not be as aware of how scrolling through Twitter is affecting our appearance.

    Even if your neck isn’t aching, all those hours craned over your iPad may still be having an effect – in the form of prematurely ageing skin.

    That’s right, keeping your neck crooked as you look at phones or your computer’s keyboard can cause deep lines and sagging in the skin of your neck.

    That modern tech related problem has led to a rise in young people getting fillers injected into the skin around their throat in an attempt to combat a neck that looks older than its years.

    ‘Lines in the neck used to be a concern for ageing patients over time which naturally occurs,’ Dr Esho, cosmetic doctor at The Esho Clinic, tells Metro.co.uk. ‘Now, as a new generation use more and more technology, the position we hold our necks in continuously can bring about the early onset of these lines known as tech neck, though genetics and weight will also have a role to play.’

    neck fillers
    (Picture: Dr Esho)

    Celebrities including TOWIE’s Jess Wright have opted for injectables in their neck to plump out those deep lines, heading to Dr Esho to make sure the procedure is done correctly.

    Getting filler injected into the neck is an alternative to those using microneedling, massage, or expensive creams to make their necks look younger.

    For the treatment, which takes two sessions, Dr Esho will inject a 0.2ml dose of a special form of hyalorounic acid called Profhilo into ten points in the neck, meaning 2ml of filler is used in total.

    The second session happens 30 days after the initial treatment, and after that results can last up to a year.

    Picture: Dr Esho)

    It all sounds like a quick fix to a niggling issue all us tech addicts are likely to face, but as with all cosmetic treatments there are risks, and it’s crucial to do your research before you go sticking needles in your neck.

    Risks of this particular treatment include excessive bleeding,infection, and tissue necrosis. The injection of fillers should only be carried out by an experienced medical professional in a clean, clinical setting.

    It’s also worth noting that all fillers eventually dissolve, so if you do want a permanently line-free neck you’d need to commit to regular injections longterm.

    You also might end up distorting your fillers by forcing your neck into the same craned position, so getting injected isn’t an excuse to scroll Instagram with wild abandon. To keep your neck looking smooth you’ll also need to take care of your posture, limit your screen time, and moisturise – which are all good habits to get into anyway.

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    NECK_TECH02-9e5dNECK_TECH02-9e5dellencscottneck fillersNECK_TECH02-9e5dNECK_TECH02-9e5dellencscottneck fillers

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    (Picture: McDonald’s)

    A bar has made our wildest dreams come true – by offering McDonald’s delivery to customers on a night out.

    If you live in Edinburgh – or plan on going there any time soon, you won’t have to search the streets for a kebab shop in the middle of the night, as Why Not nightclub in George Steet is offering McDonald’s delivery to any pre-booked tables.

    The bar announced the delivery service on its Facebook page, saying: ‘Edinburgh’s #1 new night kicks off this Friday from 10:30pm and every pre booked table package gets to order McDonalds AND we deliver it RIGHT.TO.YOUR.TABLE!’

    The service is part of the club’s new night, Drama Fridays which is set to launch on 15 September.

    Of course, booking a table isn’t free. Bookings start from £50 and include bottles of spirits and mixers, as well as the McDonald’s delivery.

    To get the delivery, you must have a pre-paid table package order, and you’ll be given a form to order your food with between 12am and 1am.

    The food will be delivered by 2am.

    The service is a great idea – it’s just a shame it’s all the way in Edinburgh.

    But hey, it’s the perfect excuse for a weekend getaway – right?

    MORE: What are the floating bits in olive oil?

    MORE: One in five young adults think we will all be vegans by 2030


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    A doctor has proved laughter is the best medicine by dancing into the hearts of seriously ill children.

    In an attempt to cheer up his patients post-op, paediatric neurosurgery physician assistant Tony Adkins, 42, from California, decided to break out into dance – and since then, dancing has become integral part to his methods of treatment.

    Insisting that smiling and being more interactive is ‘more powerful’ than some pain medication, Tony dances with all of his patients at the Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), earning him the nickname ‘Dancing Doc’.

    PIC BY TONY ADKINS/CATERS NEWS (PICTURED: Dancing Doctor belives laughter is the best medicine, and has danced his way into his partients hearts) - This pediatric physician assistant has danced into the hearts of his patients, after busting-a-move with seriously ill children in an attempt to bring a smiles to faces that havent done so for days. As the famous saying goes, laughter is the best medicine and this pediatric neurosurgery physician assistant seems to agree in abundance. In an attempt to cheer up one of his patients post-op in 2017, 42-year-old Tony Adkins, from Orange County, California, decided to spontaneously break out into dance and since then, boogying has become integral part to his methods of treatment. SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Tony Adkins/Caters News)

    Tony dances in hopes of protecting the ‘magic of childhood’ in all of his patients despite their prognoses, and he says he will continue dancing throughout his medical career.

    Army veteran Tony, said: ‘Dancing with patients is important because it adds levity and joy to the hospital experiences.

    ‘What I’m doing is right in with CHOC’s commitment to preserving the magic of childhood and ensuring patients don’t have to put their childhoods on pause.

    PIC BY TONY ADKINS/CATERS NEWS (PICTURED: Dancing Doctor belives laughter is the best medicine, and has danced his way into his partients hearts) - This pediatric physician assistant has danced into the hearts of his patients, after busting-a-move with seriously ill children in an attempt to bring a smiles to faces that havent done so for days. As the famous saying goes, laughter is the best medicine and this pediatric neurosurgery physician assistant seems to agree in abundance. In an attempt to cheer up one of his patients post-op in 2017, 42-year-old Tony Adkins, from Orange County, California, decided to spontaneously break out into dance and since then, boogying has become integral part to his methods of treatment. SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Tony Adkins/Caters News)

    ‘Studies show that when people laugh, smile and become more interactive, the effect on the brain is more powerful than some pain medications.

    ‘It has a clinical value as it allows me to assess a patient’s physical abilities, mobility and recovery process.’

    Tony recently had a patient who was reluctant to get out of bed after surgery – but an invitation to dance got him ‘out of bed and moving’.

    PIC BY TONY ADKINS/CATERS NEWS (PICTURED: Dancing Doctor belives laughter is the best medicine, and has danced his way into his partients hearts) - This pediatric physician assistant has danced into the hearts of his patients, after busting-a-move with seriously ill children in an attempt to bring a smiles to faces that havent done so for days. As the famous saying goes, laughter is the best medicine and this pediatric neurosurgery physician assistant seems to agree in abundance. In an attempt to cheer up one of his patients post-op in 2017, 42-year-old Tony Adkins, from Orange County, California, decided to spontaneously break out into dance and since then, boogying has become integral part to his methods of treatment. SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Tony Adkins/Caters News)

    Tony said: ‘After we finished dancing, he kept going and starting doing laps around the hospital floor – it was awesome to see.

    ‘Nurses have told me that when patients get admitted to the unit, they will ask for me specifically.

    ‘I’m not formally trained in dance, but I’ve always loved music and movement.

    PIC BY TONY ADKINS/CATERS NEWS (PICTURED: Dancing Doctor belives laughter is the best medicine, and has danced his way into his partients hearts) - This pediatric physician assistant has danced into the hearts of his patients, after busting-a-move with seriously ill children in an attempt to bring a smiles to faces that havent done so for days. As the famous saying goes, laughter is the best medicine and this pediatric neurosurgery physician assistant seems to agree in abundance. In an attempt to cheer up one of his patients post-op in 2017, 42-year-old Tony Adkins, from Orange County, California, decided to spontaneously break out into dance and since then, boogying has become integral part to his methods of treatment. SEE CATERS COPY
    (Picture: Tony Adkins/Caters News)

    ‘If I can help to instill a love of music and dance in my patients, in addition to improving their outcomes and outlooks, that’s a wonderful thing.

    ‘There’s nothing better than seeing a smile on my patient’s faces or to hear them laugh – it’s self-care for me too.

    ‘I will definitely continue to dance with my patients – it’s become an integral part of my treatment and care for children.

    ‘Nothing is more important than the health of a child, and I am so lucky to play an integral role in that.’

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    DAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: Getty
    (Picture: Getty)

    Eating dairy every day can lower your risk of heart disease – and helps people to live longer – suggests new research.

    According to the study, consuming three servings of dairy – which include whole-fat dairy such as milk, cheese and butter – per day, was associated with lower rates of heart disease and strokes, compared to lower levels of consumption.

    One standard serving of dairy is equivalent to a glass of milk, a cup of yoghurt, one 15 gram slice of cheese, or a teaspoon of butter (5g).

    The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study included figures from 136,384 people aged 35 to 70 years in 21 countries, including Poland and Sweden in Europe.

    Dietary intakes were recorded at the start of the study, and the participants were followed up for an average of 9.1 years.

    Dairy consumption was highest in North America and Europe (368g each day or above four servings of total dairy per day) and lowest in south Asia, China, Africa and south east Asia (less than one serving of total dairy per day).

    (Picture: metro.co.uk)

    Participants were grouped into four categories: no dairy, less than one serving per day, one to two servings per day, and more than two servings per day.

    Compared to the no intake group, the high intake group (average of 3.2 servings per day) had lower rates of total mortality, non-cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular disease, and stroke. There was no difference in the rates of heart attacks between the two groups.

    It found no significant link between dairy fats and cause of death or, more specifically, heart disease and stroke – two of the biggest killers often associated with a diet high in saturated fat.

    Researchers said that the latest findings published in The Lancet are ‘consistent’ with previous analyses of observational studies and trials.

    But they stand in stark contrast to current dietary guidelines which recommend consuming two to four daily servings of fat-free or low-fat dairy, and minimising consumption of whole-fat dairy products to prevent heart disease.

    The researchers who conducted the latest study concluded that the consumption of dairy should not be discouraged – and should perhaps be encouraged in low-income and middle-income countries where dairy consumption is low.

    DAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: Getty
    (Picture: Getty)

    Lead author Dr Mahshid Dehghan, of McMaster University in Canada, said: ‘Our findings support that consumption of dairy products might be beneficial for mortality and cardiovascular disease, especially in low-income and middle-income countries where dairy consumption is much lower than in North America or Europe.’

    But some experts say the latest study should not trigger an immediate change in dietary guidelines.

    Associate Professor Anna Rangan, of Sydney University in Australia, said of the findings: ‘The results from the PURE study seem to suggest that dairy intake, especially whole-fat dairy, might be beneficial for preventing deaths and major cardiovascular diseases.

    ‘However, as the authors themselves concluded, the results only suggest the ‘consumption of dairy products should not be discouraged and perhaps even be encouraged in low-income and middle-income countries.’

    ‘It is not the ultimate seal of approval for recommending whole-fat dairy over its low-fat or skimmed counterparts.

    ‘Readers should be cautious, and treat this study only as yet another piece of the evidence – albeit a large one – in the literature.’

    Frida Harju-Westman, in-house nutritionist at global health app, Lifesum, says cheeses like quark are a healthy dairy option, as they are lower in salt than other cheeses and high in protein.

    DAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: Getty
    (Picture: Getty)

    She tells Metro.co.uk: ‘Quark is a complete protein, which means that it contains all the essential amino acids that your body needs.

    ‘The protein in quark is divided into two varieties, whey and casein, depending on how it is made.

    ‘In addition to protein, quark contains high levels of calcium, vitamin A and vitamin B, all of which contribute to healthier bones and skin.

    ‘A great afternoon snack is the kefir & quark by Bio-tiful, add some nuts and fresh fruit for a healthy snack. It contains 18g of protein per portion and lots of good live bacteria.’

    She adds that natural Greek yoghurt is another good option – as it fuels your body with protein, magnesium and vitamin B12.

    Frida says that as with everything else, dairy is good for you – as long as it’s eaten in moderation.

    She says that if eating around 2-3 servings a day, you should opt for non-flavoured dairy foods as these are the healthier option.

    She said: ‘If you have issues digesting dairy products, before completely cutting them out of your diet, seek professional help and they can test if you have any dairy allergies and if you are lactose intolerance.

    ‘Dairy can be an essential component of a healthy and balanced diet as they care a good sources of calcium, protein, and vitamins A and D.’

    MORE: What are the floating bits in olive oil?

    MORE: One in five young adults think we will all be vegans by 2030


    Ingredients for pasta cheese sauce or pizza, freshly grated parmesan or cheddar hard cheese, raw milk in a pot, kitchen tools, grater, wooden plate and kitchen towel, rustic vintage style, top viewIngredients for pasta cheese sauce or pizza, freshly grated parmesan or cheddar hard cheese, raw milk in a pot, kitchen tools, grater, wooden plate and kitchen towel, rustic vintage style, top viewhattiegladwellmetroDAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: GettyDAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: GettyDAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: GettyIngredients for pasta cheese sauce or pizza, freshly grated parmesan or cheddar hard cheese, raw milk in a pot, kitchen tools, grater, wooden plate and kitchen towel, rustic vintage style, top viewIngredients for pasta cheese sauce or pizza, freshly grated parmesan or cheddar hard cheese, raw milk in a pot, kitchen tools, grater, wooden plate and kitchen towel, rustic vintage style, top viewhattiegladwellmetroDAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: GettyDAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: GettyDAILY DAIRY DELIGHT - Eating dairy products every day 'lowers risk of heart disease' Provider: Getty

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    Even if you’ve never been, you’ll have picked up on the idea that Tough Mudder is not for the fainthearted.

    You might remember all the way back in 2010 that slowly, surely, your Facebook feed began to filling up with baffling pictures of your pals splattered in mud looking like they’d just escaped from the trenches.

    It all sounded a little, well, frankly, mad back then, before it went mainstream.

    You ran through ten miles of mud, mate? Swam in ice water? You got…electrocuted? Might be a silly question, but why?

    Tough Mudder is looking for a chief obstacle tester
    (Picture: Tough Mudder)

    Eight years on, though, and everyone and their mum is signing up for Tough Mudder, which has turned out not only to be a euphoric personal challenge and a self-esteem boost, but also a great way to bond with friends and strangers alike

    Now, for the first time, the UK is going to be host the top-secret obstacle testing which will determine what the 2019 Tough Mudder will have in store.

    And that means there’s a new opening for an extreme job in Britain.

    Tough Mudder is looking for a chief obstacle tester
    (Picture:Tough Mudder)

    Tough Mudder are hiring a Chief Obstacle Tester,who will be responsible for forming a team of testers to battle new obstacles and give first-hand feedback on which are the most fearsome, the most exhilarating, and the most likely to get contestants drunk on adrenaline.

    The Tough Mudder team will use their consultation to design next year’s courses.

    Co-founder and CEO Will Dean says: ‘We look forward to hiring our first Chief Obstacle Tester and are excited to get their feedback on their thoughts on this year’s better than ever obstacles.

    ‘2019 promises to bring our most exciting obstacles yet.’

    Tough Mudder is looking for a chief obstacle tester
    (Picture: Tough Mudder)

    As you might imagine, the requirements for the position aren’t your usual graduate degree and two years of Excel experience.

    Instead, you’ll need to be an avid thrill-seeker who gets a kick out of facing down fears and thrives in a team — camaraderie is the essence of Tough Mudder and what makes it more than just an endurance test.

    Interested candidates can apply through LinkedIn and social channels with a 30-60 second video explaining why they are uniquely placed to be Chief Obstacle Tester.

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    All the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at work
    (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk),

    Jealousy and envy aren’t the easiest emotions to deal with, particularly in a work context.

    It can be hard to admit, even to yourself, that you’re envious of that colleague or peer who seems to have everything that you want.

    They might have a better job, be up for promotion more often, get to go on international work trips, use a company car, take home a bigger paycheck or receive more praise from people higher up than you do.

    It doesn’t matter what the specifics of the situation are; when you compare yourself to them, you always come up short.

    Workplace jealousy doesn’t just make you feel inferior to colleagues and peers. It can also trigger feelings of shame for having a touch of the green eyed monster.

    Envy is one of the seven deadly sins according to Christian teachings, and doesn’t have a reputation for being a positive emotion.

    While jealousy and envy are not strictly interchangeable (envy was wanting something, jealousy was about guarding something), they have become synonymous in modern times and we’ll mostly use jealousy here.

    The negative reputation of jealousy means that experiencing it can plunge people into spirals of self-criticism for feeling such a ‘bad’ emotion.

    It can get in the way of perfectly good relationships with others, and leave people paralysed and unable to perform or enjoy any of their own successes.

    In a workplace where effective communication and teamwork are required, feelings of bitterness and jealousy can seriously disrupt matters.

    There are plenty of downsides to professional jealousy, but can it ever be harnessed for good?

    Psychotherapist Mike Betts thinks so.

    ‘A bit of professional envy may not always be a bad thing,’ he tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘If you are experiencing professional jealousy at a particular point in your life, then you might want to take a step back and examine why you feel this way.’

    Feelings of injustice, of ‘I’ve worked just as hard as Linda so why has she just been promoted?’, or ‘smug Gary’s sci-fi novel has been optioned for a Netflix series while mine’s still looking for a publisher’ are common in a workplace.

    Although it’s not an inevitable response to the success of others, envy is a universal emotion that could actually be genetic.

    ‘In my experience, working in central London, it can be very common,’ Betts says.

    ‘We are increasingly being encouraged to compare ourselves to others, via a social media culture and an increased pressure to succeed quickly due to the shorter term nature of many jobs.

    ‘This combination can often leave people feeling anxious that they are lacking something or they are not where they “should be”.’

    Instead of denying the emotion or allowing it to fester inside you, Betts advises that you ask yourself some honest questions.

    ‘What is it about the other person’s success that you like? Are you viewing their work life through rose-tinted glasses?

    ‘Are there any things that you are perhaps projecting about their experience or position that are not entirely realistic?’

    You should be able to articulate exactly what it is that the object of your jealousy has that you really want.

    Is it a particular achievement or accolade? Is it money? Is it recognition?

    **ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new blogger
    (Picture: Phebe Lou Morson for Metro.co.uk)

    If you don’t actually work with the subject of your envy and instead see their career through the lens of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or LinkedIn, consider whether what they have is really all it’s cracked up to be.

    Are you seeing an image of someone’s professional life through the distorted mirror of social media, and failing to grasp that they have zero work life balance, get up at 4:30am every day and do a three-hour commute before making coffee for their racist boss?

    Are you consumed with an image of someone’s career that isn’t even real?

    Once you’ve identified what you want, Betts advises thinking about what you’re willing to do to get there.

    He says: ‘What are the barriers?

    ‘Are they in your own confidence or in your current working environment? Once you identify this, then you can potentially make changes.

    ‘Often we can project a fantasy of how great and easy someone else has it. But if you can be realistic and honest with yourself, maybe something good can come from it.’

    Mike Betts does make a distinction between being professionally envious of someone and feeling jealous of the people around you to the point that it’s poisoning your life.

    ‘If you’re experiencing chronic jealousy throughout your life, by comparing yourself to others, then of course this is unhealthy and it would be good to look at that.

    ‘Perpetually confirming a perceived inferiority through comparison to others will only lead to distress and will never provide a healthy outcome.’

    He also notes that although jealousy can be a motivating factor, it lead to a never-ending cycle of dissatisfaction.

    Even when you get where you want to go, you might find a new set of colleagues and peers to feel envious of, meaning that no achievement is ever enough.

    ‘The experience of anxiety and envy in a professional context is most prevalent in people who tend to constantly compare themselves to others, to either confirm some feelings of inferiority they have, or to confirm that things never go their way.

    ‘In these examples, professional envy will absolutely create an endless cycle of dissatisfaction.

    ‘There will be a propensity to perpetually compare your professional status negatively to someone else and this tendency will doubtlessly expand beyond your professional life.’

    James has experienced professional jealousy throughout his working life, despite enjoying a successful career that has spanned 35 years.

    ‘I think professional jealousy has been one of the driving forces of my career,’ he tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘I have never looked up to the hierarchy and thought “he or she is there because they are better than me”.

    ‘I’ve always thought they are there because they are luckier than me. And I hate that and it spurred me on.

    ‘It gets worse as you grow older, because suddenly you see all these young people being given jobs that you want in New York, Washington etc.

    ‘It can be motivating to feel jealous if it drives you on, but it can also be negative.

    ‘In the business I work in, there’s a lot of resentment towards people who have been given great jobs without deserving them.’

    James, a comprehensively educated man, says that there is little he can do about some of the advantages others have so there is little point in being jealous of them.

    ‘So what if someone went to private school and Oxbridge?’ he says.

    ‘Does that make them good at the job? Of course not, but it’s often a ticket to an easy ride. And I don’t have that ticket.

    ‘I wish I didn’t look at some of my colleagues with envy, but I still do, just as I did 35 years ago when I started in the job.’

    Professional jealousy can give some people the kick they need to identify what they want and go after it. Others find it debilitating and toxic.

    For some, it provides a short-term fix of motivation that keeps them climbing the ladder but ultimately keeps them unhappy, raising more questions about the nature of professional satisfaction and when you should pause to enjoy what you have rather than craving the next thing simply because someone else has it.

    If you can utilise professional jealousy as a tool, that’s great. Just make sure that it doesn’t take on a life of its own and remember to keep it in perspective.

    Mike Betts suggests making a plan of action.

    ‘Write down what you like about the other person’s position and what changes you could make to have a similar job or role.

    ‘If you can do this and be realistic with yourself, professional jealouscould lead to more positive changes in your life.

    ‘Having a mindset that says “I’m not where I should be”  will start you from a position of feeling like you’re lacking something.

    ‘It’s also important to remind yourself that you are doing well and then ask where you would like to go from there.

    ‘By doing this you can use comparisons to others to guide a new path and not become hard on yourself.’

    MORE: Do you need further evidence that dogs look like their owners?

    MORE: Why are only 4.5% of commercial airline pilots female?


    All the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workAll the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workhpwilliamson**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new bloggerAll the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workAll the damage you're doing by holding in your pee at workhpwilliamson**ILLUSTRATION REQUEST** Working whilst being in a bad place with your mental health - how I am doing it (Liam Baines) - new blogger

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    (Picture: PA Real Life)

    A woman who hid her birthmark for decades after being told it looked like ‘a pile of poo’ is finally embracing it.

    47-year-old Sammy Law has always been super self-conscious about her birthmark, which is at the top of her left arm.

    She was so embarrassed by it that during her early teens she would wear a cardigan when wearing bikinis on holiday and never wore short sleeves.

    But, after having a border of ‘sunshine’ tattooed around the brown blemish, Sammy, of Black Notley, near Braintree, Essex, feels confident to show it off, saying: ‘This birthmark took over my life. I covered it up, as I couldn’t stand people staring.

    ‘Now the tattoo is so beautiful, I forget about the birthmark at the centre.’

    Sammy, who runs a TV aerial business with her husband, Chris Law, 49, said her birthmark only became an issue when she reached her teens.

    ‘I was born with it and, as a child, my dad told me it was what made me beautiful, which I really believed,’ she continued.

    Sammy's birthmark before she had the tattoo done (PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)
    (Picture: PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)

    ‘But when I got into my teens, I noticed people staring at me and whispering, which made me start to feel like there was something wrong with me.’

    Worse was to come when Sammy started modelling, aged 14, incurring the wrath of jealous bullies.

    ‘I was in a fashion show and I felt like all eyes were on my arm,’ Sammy said.

    ‘I started to feel really uncomfortable with how I looked. On the afternoon of the fashion show, one girl came up to me and said, “Why are you even here? You look like you have poo on your arm.”

    ‘I was devastated and my confidence was crushed. Suddenly, I felt like my birthmark was so ugly and needed to be covered up.’

    From that moment on, Sammy did everything she could to hide the mark.

    She met her husband when she was 13, but it still took time to let him see her mark.

    Even on their wedding day, on May 2, 1992, Sammy wore a long-sleeved frock, instead of an off-the-shoulder bridal gown, so she could hide her birthmark.

    Sammy proudly showing her birthmark tattoo (PA Real Life/Collect)
    (Picture: PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)

    On holidays, she wore a shrug-style cardigan if she was in front of other people, apart from her close family.

    ‘If we were at the villa, over time, I would feel comfortable with a bare arm,’ she said.

    ‘But if we were at a resort or at the beach, I would wear the shrug the whole time.

    ‘Even swimming in the sea, I would go in up to my hips in the shrug, but no further.

    ‘My birthmark took over my life.’

    Finally, in June this year, Sammy woke up and decided it was time to stop feeling ashamed of her body.

    She said: ‘I woke up one morning and thought to myself, “I need to do something about this.”

    ‘I’ve already got a few tattoos on my hands, so the idea of having another one didn’t scare me and I thought it would be a great way to finally put my demons to rest.’

    Sammy's tattoo (PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)
    (Picture: PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)

    Contacting Maxine Bird, at Naked Truth Tattoo in Bocking, near Braintree, Essex, the pair discussed options for enhancing Sammy’s birthmark.

    They came up with the idea of sunshine to go around the birthmark.

    Since having the tattoo done, Sammy says she feels amazing.

    She said: ‘After the two hour session to get the £120 inking done, I couldn’t stop smiling.

    ‘I feel so much more comfortable and confident with myself.’

    Just three weeks after having her tattoo, Sammy went to Las Vegas, USA, with her family and finally wore the off-the-shoulder dresses she has always dreamed of.

    ‘Before I got the tattoo done I wouldn’t even answer the door to the postman without my arms covered,’ she said.

    ‘But now I feel so confident and free.’

    MORE: These are the insane adverts that told people smoking was good for them

    MORE: Asda releases a glittery gingerbread gin just in time for autumn


    Sammy proudly showing her birthmark tattoo (PA Real Life/Collect)Sammy proudly showing her birthmark tattoo (PA Real Life/Collect)hattiegladwellmetroSammy's birthmark before she had the tattoo done (PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)Sammy proudly showing her birthmark tattoo (PA Real Life/Collect)Sammy's tattoo (PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)Sammy proudly showing her birthmark tattoo (PA Real Life/Collect)Sammy proudly showing her birthmark tattoo (PA Real Life/Collect)hattiegladwellmetroSammy's birthmark before she had the tattoo done (PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)Sammy proudly showing her birthmark tattoo (PA Real Life/Collect)Sammy's tattoo (PA Real Life/Naked Truth Tattoo)

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    (Picture: REDDIT/flinderman)

    Every cat owner knows that though you may have adopted your fluffy friend, they’re the boss of you.

    Tigger the cat is certainly in charge of his owner, Faith Linderman.

    Faith found Tigger under a truck in a car park near where she used to work around 10 years ago.

    She adopted him, and Tigger immediately fell in love with his new home – and Faith’s dad.

    Tigger and his dad have a very special bond now – and he loved cuddling him more than anything.

    So much so, in fact, that Tigger now demands it be a part of his morning routine.

    Every single morning, Tigger will sit down and watch the news with his dead after eating breakfast.

    ‘He gets at least a half hour of cuddle time in,’ Faith told The Dodo.

    ‘And if his brother Boots tries to get there first, Tig will just sit on him ’til he moves. That is his daddy.’

    As soon as his dad leaves for work, Tigger will go off and find a place to hang out until he finally comes home again.

    Once he’s home and sitting down, Tigger will jump back into his lap for more cuddles.

    Faith said that if her dad is ever late for cuddles, Tigger becomes very upset.

    He absolutely loves his dad and although he will have cuddles with other family members, it’s just not the same.

    Faith said: ‘He will sit in the living room, hold his eyes shut and just open his mouth like he is meowing but nothing comes out.

    ‘We tell him he will be back and he will open his eyes, but it always looks like he was crying.

    ‘My dad will come home, pick him up and ask him if we picked on his baby boy and Tig will just rub his face all over Dad’s. He definitely has a special bond with my dad.’

    MORE: How to spot and treat fleas on your cat

    MORE: Inside the secret world of London’s urban foxes


    Cat demands half an hour of cuddle time every morningCat demands half an hour of cuddle time every morninghattiegladwellmetroCat demands half an hour of cuddle time every morningCat demands half an hour of cuddle time every morninghattiegladwellmetro

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    We don’t often hear Muslim voices in mainstream media.

    Women Like Us is the TV show trying to change that as it celebrates the contributions of British Muslim women.

    The all-female panel features prominent British Muslims from various ethnic backgrounds and industries.

    Activists, writers, journalists and other trailblazers such as the first Muslim president of the NUS (National Union of Students), Malia Bouattia, make up the panel.

    They discuss topics including sex, periods, racism within the Muslim community, impossible beauty standards, sectarianism, Islam and critical thinking, and British Muslim identity.

    We caught up with the creator of the show Ayman Khwaja to talk about why shows like this are important.

    (Picture: Women Like Us)

    So, how did you come up with the idea of Women Like Us?

    Out of frustration, really. I was tired of all Muslim women being represented as one, homogenous group in the media. Muslim women are so often ‘discussed’ but hardly ever the ones doing the discussing!

    It’s essential that we create spaces in which we can not only contribute to the discussion but lead it. And it’s happening across the country.

    Seeing initiatives like Amaliah fills me with hope because I see young Muslim women carving out a space for themselves, not waiting in the wings to be granted a millisecond of a spotlight.

    How did you choose the regulars?

    I wanted to provide a platform for Muslim women leading in their respective fields and to illustrate the ethnic diversity within the Muslim community.

    Once I had determined that core purpose for the show, choosing the regulars was easy. There is no shortage of brilliant British Muslim women – I only wish we had the capacity to create more episodes to invite more women! I hope we will in the future.

    Of our current regulars: Malia Bouattia is an activist, who came to Britain from Algeria as a refugee and has since served as the President of the NUS; Aina Khan is a journalist and budding playwright – of Pakistani-Pathan descent – who grew up in Bradford; and Sakinah Le Noir is a musician of Caribbean heritage, who has recently launched a fantastic project entitled Black and Muslim in Britain.

    Former president of the NUS Malia Bouattia is a regular (Picture: Women Like Us)

    Why is it important to represent different Muslim women’s voices?

    Because I am still being asked questions like this. A single Muslim woman’s experience is not representative of an entire group, and thus by extension, different voices are essential.

    What are the mains struggles of Muslim representation on TV?

    They are largely one-dimensional. Generally, when Muslims are represented on TV, they are tokenised: ‘the terrorist’, ‘the oppressed Muslim woman’, ‘the taxi driver’, ‘the corner shop owner’. And of course, this is true generally of all people of colour.

    Any highlights in the series so far or things you’re looking forward to?

    A great line up of discussions, tackling the experience of migrants, violence against women, critical thinking in Islam and so much more.

    Women Like us will air on SKY Channel 762, Freeview 264 and can be streamed live on www.britishmuslim.tv. It will will be running until October.

    MORE: Meet the Muslim women breaking boundaries in sports, comedy, dance, and modelling

    MORE: I was one of the Rohingya people that fled Myanmar – 12 months on, I’m still living in a tent with nowhere to go

    MORE: Muslims doing hajj in Saudi Arabia may be able to sleep in Japan-style nap pods soon


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    Their mates are shipping that couple (Picture: Getty)

    Teens and their slang. It’s so hard to decipher for some that Surrey Police even had to make a dictionary of young people’s terms.

    If you’re not ‘down with the kids’ you’re potentially missing out on so many fun concepts; take shipping, for example.

    No, not the shipping forecast that help you nod off every evening or the freight method taking goods over the sea. This is a new type.

    To Millennials and Gen Xers, shipping is nothing to do with boats, and instead refers to couples.

    To ship two people is to want them to be together, and stay together forever and ever and ever.

    The term comes from fan communities, who originally would call themselves ‘relationshippers’, then shortened it to ‘shippers’.

    Shipping can be done with characters, friends, or celebrities, and is particularly common in the K-Pop fandom.

    (Picture: Giphy)

    For example, there are portmanteaus of each and every BTS member combination, with fans hoping that JiKook (Jimin and Jungkook) or V-Hope (V and J-Hope) will become a thing.

    This previously took the form of One Direction members, with Directioners praying to the pop gods that Harry Styles and Louis Tomlinson would realise their love for each other. #

    The great thing about shipping is it’s easy to get involved.

    At the Village Fete, if you see newly-divorced Susan giving gardener Bill free tries on the coconut shy, turn to your BFF Barbara, look back at them, and utter the magic words: ‘I ship them so hard.’

    It’s no matter of Susan and Bill don’t end up having a romp at his allotment, it’s about whether you think it should happen. If they do, you were simply a more correct shipper than some out there.

    MORE: Young people are more likely to be scammed than pensioners

    MORE: Can professional jealousy ever be a force for good?


    Hispanic friends watching kiss at barHispanic friends watching kiss at barjessicacvlHispanic friends watching kiss at barHispanic friends watching kiss at barjessicacvl

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    METRO GRAB - taken from Twitter of @FelicityHayward without permission - viral image'Fat shaming' sweater dumped from retailer's websitehttps://twitter.com/FelicityHayward/status/1039889946197352448REVOLVE
    The ‘fatphobic’ sweatshirt sold by Revolve

    Online fashion retailer Revolve has come under fire for stocking a grey sweatshirt that reads: ‘Being fat is not beautiful it’s an excuse’.

    They ditched the jumper pretty swiftly after curve model and founder of #SelfLoveBringsBeauty Felicity Hayward called them out online.

    Haward tweeted simply: ‘What the hell is this?’

    Many others share her disgust.

    Twitter users largely condemned the shirt, with one commenter responding to Hayward’s original tweet by saying: ‘This is some complete bullshit and all of these shirts need to be burned immediately.

    ‘They should not exist in the world at all. Ever.’

    Another pointed out that the sweatshirt is available in a size XL, which seems odd, given the slogan.
    ‘Looks like @REVOLVE hate money as much as they hate ‘fat’ people. Also – this runs to an XL, seems like a contradiction.’

    Revolve has responded to the backlash by taking the sweatshirt down from their website.

    The Paloma Sweater was previously available at the price of £162.

    According to an exchange screenshotted on Instagram by artist Florence Given, the brand behind the garment, LPA, created it as part of a collaboration with five women to ‘shine a light on how horrible trolling is’.

    Instagram Photo

    Given also claims that Paloma Elsesser, the model whose name has been used for the sweatshirt, is asking for her quote to be removed.

    It remains to be seen whether the brand will make a public statement explaining the ideas behind the Paloma sweatshirt.

    After such a negative response to the ‘fatphobic’ jumper – perhaps partly due to the lack of accompanying explanation – it’s anyone’s guess whether LPA will release the rest of the collection.

    Neither Revolve nor LPA had responded to requests for comment at the time of publication.

    MORE: London Fashion Week 2018 highlights that you definitely don’t want to miss

    MORE: Where you can buy that ‘why be racist, sexist, homophobic…’ T-shirt


    'Fat shaming' sweater dumped from retailer's website'Fat shaming' sweater dumped from retailer's websitehpwilliamsonMETRO GRAB - taken from Twitter of @FelicityHayward without permission - viral image'Fat shaming' sweater dumped from retailer's websitehttps://twitter.com/FelicityHayward/status/1039889946197352448REVOLVE'Fat shaming' sweater dumped from retailer's website'Fat shaming' sweater dumped from retailer's websitehpwilliamsonMETRO GRAB - taken from Twitter of @FelicityHayward without permission - viral image'Fat shaming' sweater dumped from retailer's websitehttps://twitter.com/FelicityHayward/status/1039889946197352448REVOLVE

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    (Picture: Drunk Elephant)

    Massive news, skincare fans: No longer will you need to send a massive Sephora shopping list with any relative visiting the U.S., as cult beauty brand Drunk Elephant will finally be available in the UK.

    For those not in the know, Drunk Elephant is a range of fragrance-free skincare products that experts and influencers absolutely love.

    The brand has a massive following across the pond. Take a search on Reddit’s SkincareAddiction or in the skincare obsessed pockets of Instagram and you’ll find floods of praise for everything from virgin marula facial oil to the no.9 jelly cleanser.

    And now, after months of desperate waiting, Drunk Elephant is going to be available to buy in the UK.

    From 3 October 2018, Drunk Elephant products will be stocked at SpaceNK and Cult Beauty, so you can stock up on all the glow-inducing creams and jellies you fancy.

    Instagram Photo

    All the products are worth trying if you’re someone who loves all things beauty, as they’ve been formulated without what Drunk Elephant calls the ‘suspicious six’ – six ingredients they reckon carry a potential risk to the health and function of the skin. That means that the products are suitable for all skin types.

    The brand also uses the highest possible percentages of active ingredients, so their products will do what they say on their Instagrammable packaging.

    We’re big fans of the T.L.C. Sukari Babyfacial, high in AHAs and BHAs for a total skin refresh. It’s strong enough to knock out any dullness and blemishes, while the following up with the Virgin Marula Oil feels luxurious and hydrating.

    If you’re keen to shop the range the second it lands, you can sign up to the waiting list on Cult Beauty and SpaceNK.

    Make room on your bathroom shelves – you’re about to buy everything.

    MORE: The M&S beauty advent calendar is back, with £250 worth of goodies for £35

    MORE: An acne vaccination could be coming soon

    MORE: When does squeezing spots or scratching your skin become dermatillomania?


    babyfacial-f0e5babyfacial-f0e5ellencscottbabyfacial-f0e5babyfacial-f0e5ellencscott

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    (Picture: Francis Hawkins/SWNS.com)

    A retired baker who has just turned 100 has revealed the secret to his long life – never skip dessert.

    Lesley Hayman is still fit and active thanks to his ‘tremendous appetite’ which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, according to his family.

    He developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart.

    The great-grandfather-of-ten still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner.

    Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1942.See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.
    Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1942. (Picture: Francis Hawkins/SWNS.com)

    His favourites are apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.

    Lesley’s daughter-in-law Jennifer, 74, said: ‘Les has a tremendous appetite and loves his food.

    ‘It’s incredible really, he never leaves anything and never skips dessert.

    Lesley Hayman a 100 year-old four generation baker, Ilminster. See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.
    (Picture: Francis Hawkins/SWNS.com)

    ‘He is active and you’ll still find him out doing the gardening. He’s an amazing man.’

    Son Tim, 74, added: ‘He eats more than me – we don’t know where he puts it all.’

    Hayman’s bakery, where Lesley worked, was founded by his grandfather, George Hayman, in 1890.

    Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1939. See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.
    (Picture: Francis Hawkins/SWNS.com)

    Lesley was the third of five generations that worked for the bakery, followed by Tim and granddaughter Claire, 49.

    But his career was halted when he joined the war effort in 1939 to serve with 142 Field Regiment of the North Devon Yeomanry.

    Lesley, who still lives in his own home in Ilminster, Somerset, had two lucky escapes during World War II.

    Lesley Hayman a 100 year-old four generation baker, Ilminster. See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.
    (Picture: Francis Hawkins/SWNS.com)

    He was stationed on the slopes of Mount Etna in Italy when it erupted in 1942.

    And his tank was bombed by the Germans the same year – which he only survived because the crew had forgotten to close a turret which allowed them to escape.

    He returned to baking after the war and was married twice – to Renee and Kathleen – having three children, five grandchildren and ten great grandchildren.

    Lesley turned 100 yesterday (12 September) and is going to be celebrating his birthday with a nice meal with his friends and family in a local hotel.

    And of course he’ll be having dessert.

    MORE: Eating dairy every day could lower your risk of heart disease, suggests new research

    MORE: Forget kebabs, a club is offering McDonald’s delivery straight to your table


    Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1942.See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1942.See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1942.See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1942.See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.hattiegladwellmetroLesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1942.See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.Lesley Hayman a 100 year-old four generation baker, Ilminster. See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.Lesley Hayman as a soldier in the British army in the second world war. 1939. See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.Lesley Hayman a 100 year-old four generation baker, Ilminster. See SWNS story SWPUD; A retired baker turns 100 tomorrow (Weds) and has revealed the secret to his long life - never skip dessert. Lesley Hayman, of Ilminster in Somerset, has remained fit and active thanks to his "tremendous appetite" which has kept him at a healthy weight his whole life, family members said. Mr Hayman developed a sweet tooth when he started working in the family business at the age of 12 when he would deliver goods by horse and cart. And the great-grandfather-of-ten, who still lives in his own home, still enjoys a pie or pudding every night after his dinner - his favourites being apple pie, sponge cake or chocolate brownie.

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    This pop-up only serves a three course pudding menu Provider: Whisk Dessert Bar
    (Picture: Deb Porter/Volvo Ocean Race)

    If you’re the kind of person who orders a dessert over a starter, you’ll be delighted to know a popup dedicated to your favourite part of a meal is opening in East London.

    The Whisk Dessert Bar has already opened in Cambridge Heath, and will be open every day from now until 15 September, from 5pm to 10pm.

    The chef for the popup is Simon Jenkins, who has created desserts for both Marcus Wareing and Gordon Ramsay.

    So, what you’ll be getting is some seriously good stuff.

    This pop-up only serves a three course pudding menu Provider: Whisk Dessert Bar
    (Picture: Deb Porter/Volvo Ocean Race)

    But it’s only for those who can stomach lots of dessert. And we really do mean lots.

    Guest can expect a three-course dessert tasting menu, which includes an amuse-bouche to start, made up of fresh pineapple soft serve ice cream, chili pineapple confit and spiced crumb.

    The main dessert course is plum panna cotta, caramelised eggy bread, peach sorbet, avocado and white chocolate crémeux, Bolivian dark chocolate marquise or a celery sorbet.

    This pop-up only serves a three course pudding menu Provider: Whisk Dessert Bar
    (Picture: Whisk Dessert Bar)

    Finally, a selection of petit four will be offered to end the meal, featuring milk chocolate and raspberry truffle, lychee pâte de fruit and an apricot and almond nougat.

    Oh and just to make it even better – all of the desserts can be served with dessert wines or tea.

    Amazing.

    The menu is priced at £14 per person – with 50% off today and tomorrow, 13 September. And don’t worry if you can’t make it this week, because it will re-open from 19 September to 22 September. Race you there.

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